Publications

Accessibility


Food & Nutrition

Fight BAC! Keep Food Safe This Holiday Season: Let’s Talk Turkey (FN1443 Revised)

Turkey anyone? Who can resist the smell of turkey roasting in the oven, growing ever more golden brown almost by the minute, its gravy-making juices crackling and sizzling in the bottom of the roaster pan.

Read More…

Jellies, Jams and Spreads (FN172 Revised)

Sweet spreads are foods with many textures, flavors and colors. They are thickened or jellied to varying degrees. The traditional jellies and jams are preserved primarily by sugar.

Read More…

Healthwise for Guys: Skin Cancer (FN1869 Revised)

Skin cancer is the uncontrolled growth of skin cells due to DNA damage. Basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common and highly curable types of skin cancer. A third type, melanoma, causes the most deaths.

Read More…

Coffee Time! Exploring a Favorite Beverage (FN1894)

Coffee originated in the coffee forests of Ethiopia and has grown in popularity across the world, especially with today’s hustle-and-bustle culture. Unfortunately, numerous health controversies, concerns and warnings accompany this increasingly popular beverage. With so much confusion surrounding this energizing drink, determining fact from fiction sometimes is difficult.

Read More…

(Week 9) Cooking 101 Quick and Easy Menus, Recipes and Tips for Singles and Couples:Exploring Vegetarian Meals (FN1897)

Eating a balanced diet doesn’t have to be a challenge for those who choose to follow a vegetarian diet. Using a variety of protein sources can add zest to dishes while keeping them healthful and hearty.

Read More…

Questions and Answers About Using a Pressure Canner - FN1415

Pressure canning is recommended for low-acid foods. Low acid foods are not acidic enough to prevent the growth of bacteria and should be processed at temperatures of 240 degrees to 250 degrees, which is attainable with pressure canners. Low-acid foods include; red meats, seafood, poultry, milk, all fresh vegetables except for most tomatoes.

Read More…

From The Garden or Orchard to the Table: Jams and Jellies from North Dakota Fruits - FN590

What kinds of fruit can be successfully grown in North Dakota? What are some tested and tasty recipes for making the preserves? That’s what this circular is all about — growing and preserving the fruits of summer!

Read More…

Food Preservation: Reduced-sugar or No-sugar Fruit Spreads (FN1895)

Do you like apple or grape jelly on toast, muffins or other foods? Some people are trying to consume less sugar and calories in their diet. This handout provides research-tested recipes for reduced-sugar refrigerated fruit spreads that are easy to make.

Read More…

Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Making Your Own Pizza (FN1890)

Pizza sometimes is viewed as unhealthy or even as “junk food,” but well-chosen toppings make pizza a healthful menu option that can include all of the food groups (grain, vegetables, protein, fruit and dairy or alternative). Pizza can vary greatly in the number of calories per slice, depending on the toppings chosen and type of crust, so check the nutrition information on the ingredients you choose.

Read More…

Give the Gift of Joy With a Quick Bread Mix (FN1888)

The act of gift giving originated centuries ago and continues today. Gift giving has become a common part of peoples’ everyday lives — from commemorating special occasions to expressing gratitude. Several cultures practice the thoughtful gesture, and it brings people from different backgrounds together.

Read More…

Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Making a Salad in a Jar (FN1886)

Making an easy, on-the-go meal never has been simpler. Tap into your creative side and make your own salad in a jar recipe. Invite kids to help prepare them. Add the salad dressing of your choice and layers of tasty ingredients, and shake together when ready to eat.

Read More…

Now Serving: Nutritious Snacks for Preschoolers - FN1380

A child’s small tummy usually cannot hold enough at meals to keep him or her satisfied until the next meal. Kids younger than 6 may need to eat two to three snacks a day because they usually can’t meet their daily requirements in just three meals. Think of snacks as minimeals to help fill the gaps in their diets. Children should be getting the majority of their calories from a variety of grains (preferably whole grains), vegetables, fruits, milk products and lean protein sources.

Read More…

Now Serving: Well-Measured Recipes - FN707

Family meals promote family togetherness. Family meals provide a time to share what is going on in each other’s lives and enjoy a nutritious meal. Families who eat together are more likely to have more balanced meals. Preparing the meal is an important part of mealtime. Have children help in every aspect of the preparation, from choosing the menu to setting the table to making the meal. Including children in the preparation can lead to lifelong knowledge and memories.

Read More…

Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 5: Time-saving Tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1387

In today's busy world, cooking a meal completely from scratch may be difficult. However, convenience foods usually cost more and may be higher in calories, fat and sodium. This is the fifth in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes time-money-saving tips and sample menus with recipes that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes.

Read More…

Now Serving: More Whole Grains - FN695

Children who eat more often with their families eat a healthier diet, including more grains, fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods. Grain foods, such as pasta, bread and rice, provide energy, vitamins and minerals. USDA’s MyPlate recommends that we make at least half our grains whole. The recommendations for grain foods are in “ounce equivalents.” Enjoy 3 or more ounce equivalents of whole-grain foods every day.

Read More…

Now Serving: Nutritious After School Snacks - FN1379

Providing nutritious snacks doesn’t have to be expensive but you may need to do some planning to make them readily available for your child. Getting kids to eat fruits and vegetables can be difficult. Make snack time fun. For example, provide a variety of cut-up fruits and vegetables and let your kids create their own kabobs. You also may want to try serving vegetables with low-fat dip to make them more appealing.

Read More…

Now Serving: Meals with Help from Teens - FN706

More children and teenagers are eating meals and snacks away from their home and family. Encouraging teens to help prepare food and clean up can help busy families manage their time. Teens learn important cooking skills and have fun, too. Cooking promotes creativity and helps teens form good eating behaviors that will last a lifetime.

Read More…

Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 4: Planned-over Food tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1386

Planning menus, shopping for foods and using your leftovers wisely can pay off in many ways. Your family can enjoy healthy meals with lots of variety, and you can stretch your budget. This is the fourth in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes sample menus and recipes that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes. It also includes creative ways to make use of your leftovers, which become "planned-overs".

Read More…

Document Actions

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.