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Lawns, Gardens & Trees

Here are some publications to help you get started on your lawns, gardens, and trees this spring.

A Guide to North Dakota Noxious and Troublesome Weeds

This publication includes photos of all North Dakota state and county listed noxious weeds as well as "troublesome" plants such as poison ivy. Methods to identify and control each weed are discussed and why the plant is a concern in the state is explained. This is a pocket sized version of the publications W1411, Identification and Control of Invasive and Troublesome Weeds in North Dakota.

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Ash Tree Identification

Ash trees (in the genus Fraxinus) are susceptible to attack by the emerald ash borer (EAB), a non-native insect. The first step in determining if a tree has been infested with EAB is to make certain that it is an ash tree.

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Asparagus and Rhubarb

Asparagus is the earliest vegetable you can harvest from your garden in the spring. The young, tender shoots of asparagus usually reach cutting size about mid-May in North Dakota. New shoots may be cut as often as every other day if temperatures and moisture conditions are favorable.

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Bee-utiful Landscapes: Building a Pollinator Garden

Both native bees and European honey bees are in trouble in the United States. Homeowners can have a major impact on pollinators by planting a pollinator garden and providing suitable habitat. This publication will help you identify major pollinators, choose plants that will provide a continuous source of nectar and pollen, and safely us pesticides.

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Butterfly Gardening in North Dakota

This publication summarizes butterfly gardening including identification of butterflies, life cycle, how to plan a butterfly garden, planting a butterfly garden, flowers and host plants of caterpillars.

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Cankerworms in North Dakota

Cankerworms appear in small numbers every year, feeding on tree leaves and buds. Cankerworm outbreaks can cause severe damage, so knowing their tree hosts, the life cycle of fall and spring cankerworms and pest management can help detect and manage them.

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Elms for North Dakota

This document lists fully recommended, partially recommended and not recommended elm (Ulmus) species and cultivars. Recommendations are based on testing, experience and expert opinion. American elm, Japanese elm, Siberian elm, and hybrid elms are all discussed.

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Emerald Ash Borer: Biology and Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota

This publication summarizes the threat of invasive metallic wood-boring beetle, emerald ash borer, to North Dakota's ash trees. It's identification, biology, damage, and pest management strategies including cultural, plant resistance, biological control and chemical control are discussed. If you suspect that your ash tree is infested with emerald ash borer, it also tells you what to do.

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Field to Fork Onions!

Many types of onions are available to grow and use. Onions are ranked sixth among the world’s leading vegetable crops. On average, people eat about 20 pounds of onions a year.

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Field to Fork Potatoes!

More than 5,000 varieties of potatoes are grown throughout the world. The average person in the U.S. eats 124 pounds of potatoes every year. Potatoes can be used in a wide variety of recipes.

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Field to Fork Pumpkins!

Pumpkins are one of the colorful symbols of autumn. Most people think of using them solely for the purpose of carving and displaying, but pumpkin can be used in many ways on your menu, including soups and desserts. Try roasting the seeds for a crunchy snack.

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Field to Fork Sweet Corn!

Sweet corn on the cob (or off the cob) is a tasty addition to meals. Corn, also called “maize,” is sold by color, not variety (white, yellow or bicolor). Corn can be preserved in different ways to be enjoyed year-round.

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Field to Fork Tomatoes!

Botanically, a tomato is classified as a fruit because it has seeds and is derived from flower tissue. Nutritionists consider tomatoes to be “vegetables” on the menu. Tomatoes can be frozen, canned or dried, so we can enjoy them year-round.

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Field to Fork Winter Squash!

Squash has been used as a nutritious food for thousands of years in North America. You might find buttercup, butternut, acorn and/or spaghetti squash in your local grocery store. Botanists consider squash to be a fruit, but it is used as a vegetable on menus.

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From Orchard to Table: Apples!

Research continues to show that the fiber and natural antioxidants and other phytochemicals ("plant chemicals") in apples may help prevent chronic diseases. Learn about growing apple trees, apples and health, and how to preserve and prepare apples.

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Gardening With Children

This publication summarizes the benefits of gardening with children and provide information about basic garden preparation, tools and resources for parents/adults.

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Helping Flooded Trees and Shrubs

In North Dakota, some trees and shrubs have died and others are declining because of flood-related problems. However, you can help trees and shrubs recover. This publication gives you information to help trees and shrubs.

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Home Lawn Establishment

With the short growing season in the upper Midwest, homeowners’ desire to have a decent-looking lawn is high. Whether you are establishing a lawn, or you’re a frustrated homeowner wanting to improve what exists for turfgrass, the information in this publication will provide steps to a more attractive lawn.

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IDENTIFICATION and CONTROL of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.)

Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.

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