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Food & Nutrition

Food Freezing Basics: Freezing Dairy Products, Eggs and Other Foods - FN616

This publication provides basic instructions for freezing dairy products, eggs along with, extra hints for additional foods.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook

Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook - FN702

Let’s face it. Sometimes letting someone else do the cooking is just easier and more enjoyable. And today’s seniors have many eating options. However, all of these options do have food safety implications.

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Drying Vegetables - FN1588

Drying is a long-standing, fairly easy method of food preservation. Whenever you preserve foods, choose the best-quality fruits and vegetables. As with other food preservation methods, drying does not improve food quality. Proper and successful drying produces safe food with good flavor, texture, color and nutritional properties.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren

Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren - FN703

Many of the feeding practices you used with your own children may no longer be advocated for today’s infants and toddlers. Let’s take a look at the food safety implications of feeding a special new person in your life.

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Rate Your Fiber Fitness FN-1458

Harvest Health at Home: Rate Your Fiber Fitness - FN1458

Fiber isn’t a “miracle food,”but adding fiber-rich foods to your diet can have health benefits. The National Cancer Institute suggests that foods high in fiber may be protective against some cancers, particularly colon cancer. Although the National Cancer Institute recommends getting 20 to 35 grams of fiber per day. Soluble fiber (found in oats, dry edible beans, barley and fruits) helps lower blood cholesterol and may reduce the risk of heart disease. Insoluble fiber (found in wheat bran, whole-wheat products and vegetables) helps prevent ulcers, constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis. High fiber foods usually are low in calories and many are inexpensive, too.

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Healthy Skin

Healthy Skin: The Movie - FN1619

Using a story board format, "Healthy Skin:The Movie" takes teens and preteens through some lessons about skin care, including good nutrition and sun protection.

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Do You Need a Dietary Supplement? - FN1607

More than half of all Americans take a daily supplement, and Americans spend billions of dollars on these vitamins, minerals, fiber, herbal products and other items. Including one in your daily schedule may be commonplace.

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Pickle Buckets Can Cause Foodborne Illness! FN1381 (Revised)

Using five-gallon pickle buckets and other types of large deep containers for cooling hot foods should be avoided at all costs. While convenient for storage, these containers are much too large to be used for cooling food safely. Food may be stored in these buckets only after it has been properly cooled to refrigeration temperatures.

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Get the Facts! Steps to Reading and Understanding Nutrition Facts Labels - FN1404

You can make quick, informed decisions about foods by following these steps to reading Nutrition Facts labels on food packages.

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Cooking 101: Cooking in Small Spaces Using a Microwave Oven - FN1618

When deciding what to make for dinner, people usually consider taste, cost and convenience. Even if you have little time for meal preparation or live in a location with minimal cooking space, you still should consider nutrition.

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Eat Smart: Cook Food Safely in a Microwave Oven (FN1622)

Did you know? The microwave oven was invented when a scientist walked by a magnetron (experimental microwave tube) and the chocolate bar in his pocket melted. Do microwaves make food radioactive? No. Using a microwave is a quick and easy way to cook or reheat food. You should reheat food to “steaming hot” (165 degrees or higher) to kill harmful bacteria that could make you sick.

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Nourish Your Digestive System - FN1606

Our large intestine (colon) is home to 100 trillion “friendly” bacteria. These bacteria help defend us against disease, make certain vitamins such as vitamin K, and help break down extra food residue that remains after digestion in the small intestine. This process is known as fermentation. Our bacteria can become imbalanced due to stress, diarrhea, changes in diet and antibiotics. Consuming fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, probiotics and prebiotics can help our bacteria stay within a healthy balance.

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Tips For Living With Low Vision - FN1668

Do you find certain activities, such as reading, shopping or cooking, difficult because of your vision? Does this cause you to eat most of your meals at restaurants instead of at home? Try the tips in this publication to help you maintain independence in your daily activities.

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Cooking and Eating With Low Vision - FN1671

Imagine shopping for foods without the ability to compare prices, visually check produce for freshness, or even safely travel to and from the grocery store. Envision coming home with groceries but not being able to see inside the refrigerator or pantry clearly enough to store the foods. Then think about the challenge of preparing a meal with low vision, from finding a food in the pantry to setting the oven timer. Suddenly cooking seems like quite a daunting task!

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Pulses: The Perfect Food, Healthy to Eat, Healthy to Grow; Peas-Lentils-Chickpeas (FN1508)

Pulses, which include chickpeas/garbanzo beans, dry peas and lentils, are increasingly being recognized for their role in promoting good health. Researchers have reported that regular consumption of pulses may reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. Pulses are a versatile, easy-to-prepare ingredient that can be used in entrees, salads, breads and desserts.

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Nourish Your Brain with a Healthful Diet - FN1414

Have you ever gone into a room and forgotten what you went to retrieve? Don’t worry. That happens to most people at least sometimes. Have you fueled your brain lately? Just like your car, your brain needs fuel to operate effectively. Consuming a well-balanced diet that includes foods rich in antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids can be beneficial for the brain and the rest of your body.

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Whole Grains: Agriculture to Health - FN691

Whole-grains contain all elements of the kernel-bran, germ and endosperm. The bran and germ contain a variety of health-enhancing components-dietary fiber, phytochemicals, vitamins, trace minerals and small amounts of unsaturated fat. This publication provides the recommended daily amounts, the health benefits and recipes of whole grains.

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Food Freezing Basics: Packaging, Loading the Freezer and Refreezing - FN614

Freezing is one of the easiest, quickest, most versatile and most convenient methods of preserving foods. Properly frozen foods maintain more of their original color, flavor and texture and generally more of their nutrients than foods preserved by other methods.

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Making Magic Mixes Rolled Oats Master Mix (FN623)

Do you like to save time, money and energy? Preparing mixes for future use when you have a little time can make meal preparation quick and easy. The mix featured in this handout uses common household ingredients such as rolled oats, a good source of fiber

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The Art and Practice of Sausage Making - FN176

Sausage is a convenient food available in a great number of varieties and flavors. Sausages are an excellent source of high quality protein, containing all the essential amino acids in appropriate amounts necessary for growth, maintenance and repair of body tissue. Sausage also provides significant amounts of vitamins and minerals.

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