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Food Safety

Facililty/Equipment Safety

Food Safety Guidelines for Emergency Mass Feeding Shelters-Facility/Equipment Safety Poster - DE1545

This poster gives the guidelines for facility/equipment used in emergency mass feeding shelters.

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Keep Hot Foods Hot

Keep Hot Foods Hot and Cold Foods Cold: A Foodservice Guide to Thermometers and Safe Temperatures - FN712

Chef's should not depend on their instincts, cooking time, oven temperature or product appearance to determine when a product is done: thermometers are important tools for protecting foods.

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Increasing Food Safety on the Farm with Good Agricultural Practices - FN1920

This manual assists specialty crop growers who have an interest in increasing food safety on their farm, documenting good agricultural practices, or becoming certified through the USDA’s Good Agricultural Practices and Good Handling Practices (GAP&GHP) audit verification program.

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From field to table . . .a pocket guide for the care and handling of DEER and ELK - FN536

Concern has grown in recent years about a disease affecting deer and elk called Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), which belongs to a family of diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs). Therefore, hunters should take a few simple precautions when handling and transporting deer or elk carcasses.

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Wild Side of the Menu No. 1 Care and Cookery - FN124

The most succulent wild game can be destroyed by improper handling in the field or improper cooking at home. The handling of the meat from harvesting to preparing can make a major difference in flavor and safety of the end product. The purpose of this publication is to provide information on proper care and cookery of wild game so you can fully enjoy the fruits of the field.

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Fight BAC! Fight Foodborne Bacteria - FN582

Be a BAC Fighter and Fight BAC! Clean, separate, cook and chill.

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BAC DOWN! Keep Cold Foods Cold GIVE BACTERIA THE COLD SHOULDER. Keep the temperature in your fridge at 40 F or below. - FN612

Give bacteria the cold shoulder. Find the Chill challenge, the chill solution and the cool rules in this brochure.

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Handling Food through Floods - FN1549

Flood water may carry silt, raw sewage, oil or chemical waste. If foods have been in contact with flood waters, use this information to determine their safety.

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Safe Food for Babies and Children: Warming Bottles Safely - FN716

For the first year of a baby's life, breast milk or infant formula should be used to provide the nutrition necessary to promote growth and general health. Pre-mixed infant formula and expressed breast milk do not need to be heated prior to feeding. However, many babies prefer warm bottles because of the similarity to warm milk fed from the breast.

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Fight BAC! Keep Food Safe This Holiday Season: Let’s Talk Turkey - FN1443

Turkey anyone? Who can resist the smell of turkey roasting in the oven, growing ever more golden brown almost by the minute, its gravy-making juices crackling and sizzling in the bottom of the roaster pan.

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Food Storage Guide Answers the Question . . . - FN579

This publication provides handling tips and recommendations for storing food in your cupboards, refrigerator or freezer.

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Seniors and Food Safety: Why are Seniors at Risk for Foodborne Illness?

Seniors and Food Safety: Why are Seniors at Risk for Foodborne Illness? - FN698

James L. Smith, a microbiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wanted to find the answer to the question of why seniors are more at risk for foodborne illness. He reviewed data from foodborne outbreaks at nursing homes, and compared the immune and digestive systems of seniors and younger individuals, as well as evaluating the overall physical well-being of seniors.

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Seniors and Food Safety: What's a Senior to Eat?

Seniors and Food Safety: What's a Senior to Eat? - FN699

Smart food choices can help reduce the risk for chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke and osteoporosis. These are the leading cause of death and disability among Americans.

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Seniors and Food Safety: What's Cooking?

Seniors and Food Safety: What's Cooking? - FN701

Prevent foodborne illness with these four simple steps to prepare food safely at home.

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Making Pickled Products - FN189

Pickling is one of the oldest known methods of food preservation. Pickled foods add a special touch to many snacks and meals.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook

Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook - FN702

Let’s face it. Sometimes letting someone else do the cooking is just easier and more enjoyable. And today’s seniors have many eating options. However, all of these options do have food safety implications.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren

Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren - FN703

Many of the feeding practices you used with your own children may no longer be advocated for today’s infants and toddlers. Let’s take a look at the food safety implications of feeding a special new person in your life.

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Pickle Buckets Can Cause Foodborne Illness! - FN1381

Using five-gallon pickle buckets and other types of large deep containers for cooling hot foods should be avoided at all costs. While convenient for storage, these containers are much too large to be used for cooling food safely. Food may be stored in these buckets only after it has been properly cooled to refrigeration temperatures.

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Safe Food for Babies and Children: Making Homemade Baby Food for Babies 6 Months and Older - FN1848

This handout provides general guidance for making pureed foods at home, which can be a money-saving option or a personal preference. Making your own baby food has several advantages. You will expose your baby to more flavors, which could allow for a more adventurous eater. You also can limit sugar and salt to provide good nutrition for your baby.

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