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Eat Smart: Choose Healthful Snacks! (FN1439)

Think of snacks as minimeals that help provide nutrients and energy you need to grow, play and learn. Most kids do best when they eat four to six smaller meals a day.

Julie Garden-Robinson, Ph.D., R.D., L.R.D., Food and Nutrition Specialist

Shannon Medenwald, Program Assistant (former)


My Plate

Why did the banana go to the doctor?

Because it wasn’t peeling well!

Quick Snack Ideas:

  • Whole fruit, such as an apple, banana or orange
  • Berries
  • Raw, cut-up vegetables
  • Graham crackers
  • String cheese
  • Cheese and crackers
  • Frozen yogurt

Eat smart by snacking smart.

Think of snacks as minimeals that help provide nutrients and energy you need to grow, play and learn. Most kids do best when they eat four to six smaller meals a day.

Are you eating enough fruit? Let snacks fill in the gaps. If you miss juice for breakfast, try having a piece of fruit, such as a banana, at snack time.

Time snacks carefully. Try eating two to three hours before meals. That way you will be hungry for lunch or supper. Keep snacks small. If you are still hungry, eating more is OK. You decide when you have had enough food to eat.

Easy- to-make Snack Ideas:

  • Milk Shake Ups - Pour milk, juice and ice into a covered container. Shake. Serve.
  • Fruit Juice Pops - Freeze fruit juice in small paper cups or ice cube trays. Serve.
  • Crunchy Bananas - Peel bananas. Roll them in peanut butter or yogurt and then roll in crushed cereal. Freeze. Serve.
  • Peanut Butter Logs - Spread peanut butter onto celery sticks. Serve.

Fruit Dip

2 c. low-fat sour cream

1-ounce package sugar-free instant vanilla pudding mix

¼ c. fat-free milk

4 tsp. lemon juice

1. Whisk together all ingredients until well-blended.

2. Serve with assorted fruit.

Makes eight servings (¼ cup per serving). Each serving has 90 calories, 5 grams (g) fat, 7 g carbohydrate and 4 g protein.

Source: Penn State Cooperative Extension

Eat Smart. Play Hard. This website has information for parents and kids, including fun educational games and recipes.

“Eat Smart. Play Hard.” is an initiative of the Food and Nutrition Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Materials were partially funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

 

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