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Eat Smart. Play Hard. Do You Need an Energy Drink?? (FN1435 (Revised))

People often substitute energy drinks for healthier beverage choices, so compare the Nutrition Facts labels. Energy drinks provide few if any of the needed vitamins and minerals provided by healthier beverage choices. Plain water is a better choice for most individuals.

Julie Garden-Robinson, Ph.D., R.D., L.R.D., Food and Nutrition Specialist

Shannon Medenwald, Program Assistant (former)


My Plate 

What do names such as Amp, Monster and Rockstar all have in common?

They are names of popular energy drinks.

Do you know what’s in an Energy Drink?

Do a little detective work. Read the ingredient list, which shows the ingredients from the largest amount to the smallest amount.

Energy drinks often contain high amounts of caffeine and sweeteners. Besides caffeine, some energy drinks contain large amounts of calories with few nutrients. Energy drinks may contain substances such as guarana and taurine, both of which might produce harmful effects when consumed in excess.

People often substitute energy drinks for healthier beverage choices, so compare the Nutrition Facts labels. Energy drinks provide few if any of the needed vitamins and minerals provided by healthier beverage choices. Plain water is a better choice for most individuals.

 Try these tips to stay energized without an energy drink:

  • Eat breakfast every day.
  • Have regular meals or snacks every three or four hours. Get your MyPlate Daily Food Plan.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids, such as water, milk and 100 percent juice.

Try this recipe to give you energy and a nutrition boost:

Fruit for the Day Smoothie

1 7-ounce can mandarin oranges (in light syrup)

2 frozen bananas, peeled and sliced

2 c. frozen unsweetened strawberries

1½ c. fat-free milk

Add all ingredients to the blender in the order listed above. Be sure to hold down the lid and blend on low speed for 30 seconds. Then blend on high speed for one minute.

Makes four servings. Each serving has 140 calories, 31 grams (g) carbohydrate, 0 g fat and 3 g fiber.

Eat Smart. Play Hard. For more information. This website has information for parents and kids, including fun educational games and recipes.

“Eat Smart. Play Hard.” is an initiative of the Food and Nutrition Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Materials were partially funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. 1/14

 

 

 

 

 

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