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This is a complete list of Crops publications. You can look for more specific types of publications using the links to the left.

North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2018 and Selection Guide (A1196-18)

Results of winter wheat trials conducted throughout the state are included in this publication. The result tables provide data that can be used to select winter wheat varieties that performed well in 2018.

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Growing Chickpea in North Dakota (A1236 Revised)

The Growing Chickpeas in North Dakota production information provides growers with crop management, diseases, and insects and tips to select varieties for the designated market.

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Tobacco Rattle Virus in Potato (A1896)

Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) causes the economically important corky ring spot (CRS) disease in potato. Tobacco rattle virus is transmitted in the filed by soil-inhabiting stuffy root nematodes of the genera Trichodorus and Paratrichodorus.

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The Armyworm and the Army Cutworm (E830 Revised)

This publication summarizes pest management of Armyworms and Army cutworms in field crops (alfalfa, canola, corn, small grains, sugarbeets) grown in North Dakota. topics covered include: identification, life cycle, crop damage, trapping, field scouting, and economic thresholds in different field crops.

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IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863

This publication reviews what Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is for agriculture. Examples of different pest management strategies, such as cultural, host plant resistance, mechanical, biological and chemical are described. The steps of implementing IPM and its benefits are summarized.

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Powdery Scab of Potatoes (PP1891)

Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (referred to as S. subterranea), the causal agent of powdery scab and root gall formation in potato, is a soil- and tuber-borne funguslike pathogen. S. subterranea first was reported in the U.S. in 1913. During this same year, the disease was found established in potato-growing states such as Maine, Florida, Minnesota and Oregon. To date, the pathogen can be found causing disease throughout the U.S., as well as several other potato-growing regions around the world.

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Early Blight in Potato (PP1892)

Early blight of potato is caused by the fungal pathogen Alternaria solani. The disease affects leaves, stems and tubers and can reduce yield, tuber size, storability of tubers, quality of fresh-market and processing tubers and marketability of the crop.

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Integrated Pest Management of Spotted Wing Drosophila in North Dakota - E1715

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) is a vinegar fly that was first confirmed in ND in 2013 as an invasive pest of soft-skinned fruit crops. The SWD lays its eggs in healthy, ripening fruits. Then larvae hatch from eggs and feed on the fruit causing spoilage. Identification, life cycle and pest management strategies are discussed.

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Integrated Pest Management of Alfalfa Weevil in North Dakota - E1676

Identification and biology of the alfalfa weevil is discussed. When and how to scout, and use of economic thresholds for making management decisions. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies are discussed including biological control, cultural control and insecticidal control.

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Site-specific Farming: Economics and the Environment - SF1176-4

Site-specific farming technologies can result in economic gain for farmers if used correctly, and can also decrease impact from the environment from off-sight movement of fertilizers to groundwater and surface waters.

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Compatibility of North Dakota Soils for Irrigation (AE1637)

This publication is intended as a first step to help current and prospective irrigators understand the principles behind the irrigability of soils in North Dakota. This publication lists all the soils in the state with relevant properties and categorizes them as irrigable, conditional or nonirrigable.

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Soil Sampling as a Basis for Fertilizer Application (SF990 Revised)

This publication was first made available in 1998. Since then, there has been significant research into soil testing methods. This revision will include these updated findings and recommendations.

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North Dakota Clay Mineralogy Impacts Crop Potassium Nutrition and Tillage Systems (SF1881)

Clay mineralogy is important in directing potassium rate to corn and other crops in North Dakota. It also has an impact on tillage systems and their success and proper management.

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Limitations of the Sulfate-sulfur Soil Test as a Predictor of Sulfur Response (SF1880)

In the past dozen years, sulfur deficiency in the north central region has become common in historically unaffected soils. The reasons include higher crop yield and the associated increased demand for soil sulfur, but also the clean air as a result of regulation. The sulfur soil test has been used for years, but researches now find it has little value.

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Herbicide Mode of Action and Sugar Beet Injury Symptoms (A1085)

This technical bulletin has been updated and includes herbicide families that were not discovered when the original bulletin was written. The bulletin contains improved image quality.

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Site-specific Farming: Yield Mapping and Use of Yield Map Data (SF1176-3 Revised)

This circular, although originally published in 2008 is still relevant and useful as is. Although almost half of ND farmers utilize some site-specific technology, the other half would also benefit from its use.

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Corn Ear Molds: Basic Questions and Answers - PP1451

Corn ear molds are of concern because of their potential to produce mycotoxins, which may affect livestock feeding value. The following provides some answers to frequent questions about corn ear molds.

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The Thistles of North Dakota - W1120

Thistles in agriculture have a reputation as a sign of untidiness and neglect, and are often found on good ground not properly cared for. However, this unfortunate characteristic is only true of a few invasive species and is not accurate for the vast majority of native thistles which have many useful traits.

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Identification and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) - W1132

Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.

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Integrated Pest Management of Pea Leaf Weevil in North Dakota (E1879)

This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of pea leaf weevil including host plants (field peas and faba beans), geographic range, identification, life cycle, crop damage, monitoring, economic threshold, cultural control, and chemical control.

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