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Dry Bean Production Guide

Dry bean is a food crop that requires the producers to provide special cultural management and attention. Proper management is essential from cultivar selection, field selection and planting through harvest, plus marketing for maximum profitability. This guide helps producers meet those production challenges.

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Early Blight in Potato

Early blight of potato is caused by the fungal pathogen Alternaria solani. The disease affects leaves, stems and tubers and can reduce yield, tuber size, storability of tubers, quality of fresh-market and processing tubers and marketability of the crop.

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Effectiveness of Using Low Rates of Plant Nutrients

This is a much delayed update to the original, which was a North Central Regional Publication 341, but the national AES doesn't support publications anymore, so this will be an NDSU publication. It includes use of low rates of planting time fertilizer with or near the seed, use of foliar fertilizers and approximate elemental composition of many regional crops.

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Ergot in Small Grains

This publication provides information on frequently asked questions pertaining to ergot and its impact on small grains and if it fed to livestock.

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Evaluation of Soils for Suitability for Tile Drainage Performance

The presence of salts and high water tables in North Dakota soils due to an extended climactic wet cycle recently has stimulated interest in the installation of tile drainage systems. The tile controls the water table and encourages the leaching and removal of salts from the soil above the tile lines. This improves soil productivity, culminating in improved crop yields

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Fertilizing Flax

Flax is an ancient crop. Evidence indicates it was cultivated in the Middle East as early as 7000 B.C. Ancient Egyptians cultivated flax extensively as a fiber crop for linen production, while other peoples utilized the seed for food as well as the fiber. Today, growers in Canada and the U.S. grow seed flax varieties.

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Fertilizing Canola and Mustard

This is an updated circular for a crop that is important to the livelihood of North Dakota framers north of highway 2, generally. All references to yield-based nutrient formulas are taken out of this revision.

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Fertilizing Hard Red Spring Wheat and Durum

Nitrogen management is a key to successful wheat production. Recommendations include consideration of wheat yield and protein response to added N within three major state agri-climatology zones, and the use of wheat price and N cost in determining N rate. These recommendations are based on the concept that identifies an optimal N rate for greatest net income, not greatest yield.

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Fertilizing Malting and Feed Barley

The yield-based N rate formula has been terminated. These recommendations have been updated to reflect that yield and N rate are not related between environments. Also, N recommendations for western ND have been modified to incorporate the special requirements for achieving malting grade in that environment.

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Fertilizing Potato in North Dakota

The previous edition provided a nutrient rate to potato regardless of varietal efficiency nad harvest date. This edition provides this updated information and also recommendation potassium based in part on soil clay chemistry.

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Fertilizing Sugar Beet in North Dakota

Sugar beet growers in this region are paid based on the tons of recoverable sucrose that is extracted from their crop. Therefore, sugar beet profitability depends on producing a high-tonnage crop that is high in sucrose percentage.

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Fertilizing Winter Wheat

Winter wheat fertilization recommendations in North Dakota previously were similar to spring wheat and durum. As a larger research base was developed for spring wheat and durum, separating the winter wheat from other wheat became necessary due to their unique nutrient requirements.

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Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet

Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.

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Grain Stream Sampling and Sampler Construction

Accurate grain sampling is equally important to both the producer and the buyer of grain. A grain sample is important because information from the sample is used to establish the quality characteristics and the value of the grain. Therefore, it is important that proper thought and attention be given to the method of collection, sample size, and frequency of sample collection per unit volume of grain.

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IDENTIFICATION and CONTROL of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.)

Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.

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