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Grain Drying & Storage

Harvesting, Storing and Feeding High-moisture Corn

Harvesting, Storing and Feeding High-moisture Corn - AS1484

High-moisture corn (HMC) offers many advantages for producers who feed beef or dairy cattle. However, successfully using high-moisture corn requires attention to harvest timing, processing, storage conditions and feeding management.

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Grain Drying

Grain Drying - AE701

Grain drying, as used in this publication, refers to the removal of some of the moisture from grain by mechanically moving air through the grain after it has been harvested. Grain in the field dries naturally as the crop matures, giving up mois-ture to the air until the grain moisture is in equilibrium with the moisture in the air (equilibrium moisture content). Conditions become less favorable for grain to dry to moisture contents considered safe for storage as the harvest is delayed into late fall.

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Caught in the Grain!

Caught in the Grain! - AE1102

People can become caught or trapped in grain in three different ways: the collapse of bridged grain, the collapse of a vertical wall of grain, and entrapment in flowing grain. Moving or flowing grain is involved in all three. People who work with grain – loading it, unloading it, and moving it from bin to bin – need to know about the hazards of flowing grain and how to prevent a grain entrapment situation.

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Grain Stream Sampling and Sampler Construction

Grain Stream Sampling and Sampler Construction - AE1044

Accurate grain sampling is equally important to both the producer and the buyer of grain. A grain sample is important because information from the sample is used to establish the quality characteristics and the value of the grain. Therefore, it is important that proper thought and attention be given to the method of collection, sample size, and frequency of sample collection per unit volume of grain.

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Growing Lentil in ND

Growing Lentil in North Dakota - A1636

An overview of lentil production for specialty crop producers, including weed control, diseases, harvesting and references. Lentil production in North Dakota primarily has been confined to the western part of the state because disease is an issue under higher moisture conditions. Lentil is an excellent rotational crop. Production of lentil or other legumes in a diverse cropping system may improve soil health, and provides for an opportunity to control problem weeds such as downy brome.

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Temporary Grain Storage

Temporary Grain Storage - AE84

The purpose of any grain storage facility is to prevent grain quality loss from weather, wind and moisture; rodents, birds and insects, and microorganisms. Various techniques and facilities have been used to store grain temporarily. Generally, the more durable the facility, the longer grain can be stored without excess loss.

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Corn Drying and Storage

Corn Drying and Storage - AE1119

Corn producers have some control over corn quality through variety selection, timing and care used in harvesting, selection and operation of dryers and conveyors, and storage management.

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Preventing Hay Fires DE-1589

Preventing Hay Fires - DE1589

Excessive moisture is the most common cause of hay fires. A chemical reaction in high-moisture haystacks or bales produces flammable gas that can ignite if the temperature is high enough (about 130 F). Fire is possible in loose, baled or stacked hay stored inside or outside. Hay becomes a fire hazard when the moisture content is 20 percent or higher in small stacked bales and more than 18 percent in stacked large square or round bales. Hay fires usually occur within six weeks of baling.

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