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Feeds & Feeding

Using Flax in Beef and Dairy Cattle Diets

Using Flax in Beef and Dairy Cattle Diets - AS1283

This publication provides information regarding the nutritive and feeding value of flax, examines the literature on the implications of using flax in livestock diets and offers recommendations on future research needs.

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Winter Management of Feedlot Cattle

Winter Management of Feedlot Cattle - AS1546

Good winter management practices contribute to healthy and productive cattle, reasonable feed costs and humane care of feedlot cattle. This publication describes recommended management practices for feedlot cattle in the winter.

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2016 ND Beef Report

2016 North Dakota Beef Report - AS1815

The report has several short research reports from researchers conducting research on beef cattle and associated topics.

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Corn Residue in Beef Cattle Diets

Utilizing Corn Residue in Beef Cattle Diets - AS1548

Corn residue is a useful feedstuff for beef cattle. Producers should consider incorporating these fee resources into their grazing and feeding programs to reduce the cost of production.

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Harvesting, Storing and Feeding High-moisture Corn

Harvesting, Storing and Feeding High-moisture Corn - AS1484

High-moisture corn (HMC) offers many advantages for producers who feed beef or dairy cattle. However, successfully using high-moisture corn requires attention to harvest timing, processing, storage conditions and feeding management.

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Sugar Beet Byproducts to Cattle

Feeding Sugar Beet Byproducts to Cattle - AS1365

The sugar beet industry produces a wide variety of useful byproducts for livestock feeders. The decision to incorporate sugar beet byproducts into diets should be based on economics, local availability, and feasibility of storage, handling and feeding. For the wet byproducts, careful attention should be given to transportation costs and storage. In addition, rations containing sugar beet byproducts should be balanced properly to achieve targeted livestock performance.

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Alternative Feedstuffs

Alternative Feeds for Ruminants - AS1182

This publication provides a brief overview of possible feedstuffs for cattle and sheep producers along with general feeding recommendations.

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2015 Beef Report

2015 North Dakota Beef Report - AS1775

This report contains several small papers from researchers in ND on current research results related to beef cattle. The report is posted as a complete report as well as, individual reports.

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Processing Forages for Livestock Feed

Processing Forages for Livestock Feed - R1769

This publication will address: • Equipment used for processing • Benefits that may be gained through processing forages • Other considerations for processing forages for livestock diets

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Livestock Water Quality

Livestock Water Quality - AS1764

Water is an important, but often overlooked, nutrient. Good water quality and cleanliness can increase water intake and improve livestock production. Low-quality water has reduced palatability and may be toxic to livestock. Water quality may be compromised by many factors including pH, salts, sulfates, nitrates, pathogenic microorganisms, chemicals and industrial products.

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Livestock Water Requirements

Livestock Water Requirements - AS1763

Water is an important, but often overlooked, nutrient. Livestock water requirements are affected by many factors including, size, productivity, diet and environmental conditions. Water quality and cleanliness can increase water intake and improve livestock production. Limited access or reduced water consumption can result in dehydration, which can be fatal to livestock.

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Cover Crop Options

Annual Cover Crop Options for Grazing and Haying in the Northern Plains - R1759

The purpose of this publication is to provide annual forage options that can be used in cover crop mixtures for livestock grazing and/or hay production. The use of cover crops in a cropping rotation has been resurrected in recent years due to greater awareness of their environmental and ecological impacts on our natural resources.

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Comparing Value of Feedstuffs

Comparing Value of Feedstuffs - AS1742

Determining the nutrient concentration and cost of each nutrient in feedstuff s allows producers to evaluate ration quality and cost. In addition, cost determination can be very helpful when deciding which feed to purchase in cases of diff ering asking prices and nutrient quality. This publication is meant to be a step-by-step guide to calculating feed values to allow appropriate comparison of feedstuffs.

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2014 ND Beef Report

2014 North Dakota Beef Report - AS1736

This report contains several small papers from researchers in ND on current research results related to beef cattle. The report is posted as a complete report as well as, individual reports.

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Feed Efficiency

Improving Profitability Through Feed Efficiency by Reducing Feed Bunk Losses - AS1641

Feeding behavior of group-housed dairy cows is influenced by management practices at the feed bunk and factors associated with the physical and social environment. The feeding pattern of group-housed dairy cows is largely influenced by the timing of fresh feed delivery, and the delivery of fresh feed has a greater impact on stimulating cows to eat than does the return from milking. Delivering fresh feed more frequently improves access to fresh feed for all cows and reduces sorting of the TMR. This potentially will reduce variation in diet quality consumed by cows, with benefits for milk production.

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Backgrounding Beef Cattle

Systems for Backgrounding Beef Cattle - AS1151

Many different methods or systems of backgrounding, or growing beef cattle, are available. Each system has advantages and disadvantages that producers must weigh before deciding which is right for them. Producers should recognize the need for many different types of systems because of the many different types of cattle. Not all backgrounding systems work with each type of cattle. Some cattle are best suited to being finished directly after weaning, while other cattle are best finished following an extensive growing program. This publication will outline the different types of backgrounding systems that are available for producers to use and describe the kind and type of cattle that best fit each system.

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Feeding Coproducts of Ethanol Industry to Beef Cattle

Feeding Coproducts of the Ethanol Industry to Beef Cattle - AS1242

Coproducts from the ethanol industry are useful feed ingredients for beef cattle producers. Corn distillers grains are high in energy and protein and can be fed wet or dry in many different types of rations.

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Winter Feeding for Beef

Alternative Winter Feeding Strategies for Beef Cattle Management - NM1726

The focus of this publication is to highlight alternative practices for consideration as an alternative to winter animal confinement in a feedlot.

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Silage Fermentation and Preservation

Quality Forage: Silage Fermentation and Preservation - AS1254

High-quality silage is achieved when lactic acid is the predominant acid produced because it is the most efficient fermentation acid and will drop the pH of the silage the fastest. The faster the fermentation is completed, the more nutrients will be retained in the silage.

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Haylage and Other Fermented Forages

Quality Forage: Haylage and Other Fermented Forages - AS1252

Cutting fresh forage at the optimal stage of maturity and feeding it directly to animals year-round would supply the highest-quality and most palatable feed possible. In addition, field and storage losses would be the least of all methods of forage utilization. However, fluctuations in seasonal growth and plant maturity make harvesting and storing forages necessary to maximize quality and productivity.

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