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Johne’s Disease in BEEF and DAIRY herds V1209 (Revised)

Johne’s is a slowly progressive disease that costs the producer through excessive culling, suboptimal milk production, decreased fertility and death loss.

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Bird Challenges

Managing Common Bird Challenges on Dairy and Livestock Operations - AS1758

This publication is intended to summarize the most common methods that producers can use and is not intended to be your only source of reference. We have mentioned several products for discussion and example, but we do not endorse any one product or method.

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Feed Efficiency

Improving Profitability Through Feed Efficiency by Reducing Feed Bunk Losses - AS1641

Feeding behavior of group-housed dairy cows is influenced by management practices at the feed bunk and factors associated with the physical and social environment. The feeding pattern of group-housed dairy cows is largely influenced by the timing of fresh feed delivery, and the delivery of fresh feed has a greater impact on stimulating cows to eat than does the return from milking. Delivering fresh feed more frequently improves access to fresh feed for all cows and reduces sorting of the TMR. This potentially will reduce variation in diet quality consumed by cows, with benefits for milk production.

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Silage Fermentation and Preservation

Quality Forage: Silage Fermentation and Preservation - AS1254

High-quality silage is achieved when lactic acid is the predominant acid produced because it is the most efficient fermentation acid and will drop the pH of the silage the fastest. The faster the fermentation is completed, the more nutrients will be retained in the silage.

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Haylage and Other Fermented Forages

Quality Forage: Haylage and Other Fermented Forages - AS1252

Cutting fresh forage at the optimal stage of maturity and feeding it directly to animals year-round would supply the highest-quality and most palatable feed possible. In addition, field and storage losses would be the least of all methods of forage utilization. However, fluctuations in seasonal growth and plant maturity make harvesting and storing forages necessary to maximize quality and productivity.

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Stressed or Damaged Crops

Quality Forage: Stressed or Damaged Crops - AS1256

Stressed crops resulting from unfavorable weather conditions require special management considerations. Yield and quality of frost and drought-damaged crops usually are maximized when harvested as silage.

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Corn Silage Management

Quality Forage: Corn Silage Management - AS1253

Silage can be made from many different crops, although the ability to make good silage is limited at times. In North Dakota, corn is a widely used crop for silage. Worldwide, corn silage is one of the most important forges used for livestock.

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Storage, Sampling and Measuring

Quality Forage: Storage, Sampling and Measuring - AS-1255

Using proper sampling techniques is essential to obtain a representative sample for moisture determination. For hay, the procedure used will vary, depending on whether sampling is being done from the windrow, bale or stack.

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Johne's Disease in Beef and Dairy Herds

Johne's Disease in Beef and Dairy Herds - V1209

Johne’s (pronounced “yo-knees”) disease is a chronic wasting disease in ruminants caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis. This bacterium is closely related to the bacterium that causes tuberculosis in cattle and humans. H.A. Johne, a German veterinarian, fi rst described this disease in 1895; his name is used as the common name for this disease, also known as paratuberculosis.

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Land Application of Solid Manure

Options for Land Application of Solid Manure - NM1613

Based on the type of livestock facility, manure can be handled and stored as a liquid (less than 5 percent dry matter), slurry (5 to 10 percent dry matter) and/or solid (greater than 15 percent dry matter). Figure 1 shows the relative consistency of the various types of manure that common animal species excrete. Depending on manure consistency, manure application equipment and application methods differ significantly.

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