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Animal Health

Borreliosis (Lyme disease)

Borreliosis (Lyme disease) - V1694

Borreliosis (Lyme disease) is the most commonly reported vector-borne (insect-transmitted) disease in the U.S. In this country, it is found primarily in the Northeast, upper Midwest and northern California. Boreliosis is caused by a spiral bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, that is found in a variety of reservoir hosts (birds, small and medium-sized mammals). Humans are infected by a tick bite.

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Tick-borne Infections

Tick-borne Infections - V1693

Tick-borne infections are found worldwide. In the upper Midwest, this group of diseases consists primarily of tularemia, borreliosis (Lyme disease), ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. Tularemia (Francisella tularensis) and borreliosis (Borrelia burgdorferi) have been covered in prior publications; therefore, this discussion will focus on ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. These diseases are passed from ticks to wild and domesticated animal reservoir hosts. Humans are infected when bitten by ticks carrying the pathogenic bacteria.

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Checklist for Beef Producers

A Preventive Herd Health Program: Checklist for Beef Producers - AS1731

This is a guide to beef producers in consultation with a veterinarian for the implementation of a herd health program.

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2014 ND Beef Report

2014 North Dakota Beef Report - AS1736

This report contains several small papers from researchers in ND on current research results related to beef cattle. The report is posted as a complete report as well as, individual reports.

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Strangles

Strangles - V541

Strangles, which also is known as horse distemper, is a highly contagious disease. The disease causes swelling of the lymph nodes under the jaw and immediate isolation of affected horses. Medical treatment varies widely and mid cases will usually resolve without any antibiotic treatment.

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Feed Efficiency

Improving Profitability Through Feed Efficiency by Reducing Feed Bunk Losses - AS1641

Feeding behavior of group-housed dairy cows is influenced by management practices at the feed bunk and factors associated with the physical and social environment. The feeding pattern of group-housed dairy cows is largely influenced by the timing of fresh feed delivery, and the delivery of fresh feed has a greater impact on stimulating cows to eat than does the return from milking. Delivering fresh feed more frequently improves access to fresh feed for all cows and reduces sorting of the TMR. This potentially will reduce variation in diet quality consumed by cows, with benefits for milk production.

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Backgrounding Beef Cattle

Systems for Backgrounding Beef Cattle - AS1151

Many different methods or systems of backgrounding, or growing beef cattle, are available. Each system has advantages and disadvantages that producers must weigh before deciding which is right for them. Producers should recognize the need for many different types of systems because of the many different types of cattle. Not all backgrounding systems work with each type of cattle. Some cattle are best suited to being finished directly after weaning, while other cattle are best finished following an extensive growing program. This publication will outline the different types of backgrounding systems that are available for producers to use and describe the kind and type of cattle that best fit each system.

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Feeding Coproducts of Ethanol Industry to Beef Cattle

Feeding Coproducts of the Ethanol Industry to Beef Cattle - AS1242

Coproducts from the ethanol industry are useful feed ingredients for beef cattle producers. Corn distillers grains are high in energy and protein and can be fed wet or dry in many different types of rations.

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Winter Feeding for Beef

Alternative Winter Feeding Strategies for Beef Cattle Management - NM1726

The focus of this publication is to highlight alternative practices for consideration as an alternative to winter animal confinement in a feedlot.

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Silage Fermentation and Preservation

Quality Forage: Silage Fermentation and Preservation - AS1254

High-quality silage is achieved when lactic acid is the predominant acid produced because it is the most efficient fermentation acid and will drop the pH of the silage the fastest. The faster the fermentation is completed, the more nutrients will be retained in the silage.

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Haylage and Other Fermented Forages

Quality Forage: Haylage and Other Fermented Forages - AS1252

Cutting fresh forage at the optimal stage of maturity and feeding it directly to animals year-round would supply the highest-quality and most palatable feed possible. In addition, field and storage losses would be the least of all methods of forage utilization. However, fluctuations in seasonal growth and plant maturity make harvesting and storing forages necessary to maximize quality and productivity.

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Stressed or Damaged Crops

Quality Forage: Stressed or Damaged Crops - AS1256

Stressed crops resulting from unfavorable weather conditions require special management considerations. Yield and quality of frost and drought-damaged crops usually are maximized when harvested as silage.

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Encephalitis Virus Infections

Encephalitis Virus Infections - V1677

Arboviral infections are zoonotic (transmissible between animals and humans).

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Veterinary Feed Directive

Understanding the Veterinary Feed Directive - V1719

This publication explains the new FDA regulation regarding the use of medicated feeds and specifically related to the Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD).

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Echinococcus in Dogs and Cats

Echinococcus in Dogs and Cats - V1669

Echinococcosis is a disease caused by the infection of animals and humans with tapeworms belonging to the genus Echinococcus. An understanding of the parasite life cycle is important in reducing human and animal exposure.

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Roundworms in Dogs and Cats

Roundworms in Dogs and Cats - V1670

Canine and Feline Roundworm and Hookworm Infections: A Public Health Concern Domestic dogs and cats are capable of infecting humans with the eggs of canine and feline roundworms and hookworms shed in fecal matter. While these types of infections are uncommon, they are well-described in the medical literature and can, in some cases, be severe.

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Interpreting Composition and Determining Market Value

Quality Forage: Interpreting Composition and Determining Market Value - AS1251

New knowledge in forage quality and animal feeding, and significant advances in improving the genetic potential of animals used to produce milk, meat and wool, improve efficiency and lower costs. However, to do this, today’s producer must be aware of and utilize the latest information on feed quality and feeding management.

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Estrus Synchronization

Estrus Synchronization for Natural-service Breeding in Beef Cattle - AS1712

Breeding systems that utilize natural-service bulls to breed estrus-synchronized females may offer opportunities to get females pregnant earlier in the breeding season, have calves born earlier in the calving season and possibly increase weaning weight of calves born to synchronized females.

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Forage Nutrition for Ruminants

Forage Nutrition for Ruminants - AS1250

Plants utilized in the feeding of livestock have long been a fundamental link in the food chain. Native grasses supported grazing animals well before man began to domesticate livestock. Forages have always been an extremely important source of nutrients in livestock rations. Additionally, they provide fiber in the ration which enhances proper digestion in forage-consuming animals. Through their conversion into milk and meat products, forages continue to be one of the primary sources of nourishment in the human diet.

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Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis - V1315

Leptospirosis is caused by the bacteria Leptospira interrogans. Leptopira has more than 180 different serovars (subclassifi cations). Each serovar is adapted to a particular species or maintenance host.

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