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Can We Talk About Folic Acid - FN704
What is It? OK, so you’ll think about taking folic acid, but what is it exactly? Folic acid is a human-made form of the B vitamin folate, and is necessary for making new, healthy cells in the body. Everyone Needs It Recent studies have shown that folic acid may reduce the risk of cardiac disease and certain types of cancers. Some studies suggest it also might help lower the risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Eat Smart. Play Hard. Get Your Iron! - FN1436
Your body needs iron to move oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Iron is an important part of hemoglobin, which is the part of your red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the rest of the body.
Located in Landing Pages / Health and Fitness
Eat Smart: Enjoy Healthier Snacks at Work - FN1398
Are you tempted by bowls of candy and trays of cookies at work? Say no to secondhand sweets, and think twice about the food you offer at meetings and around the office. Are you eating enough fruits, vegetables and whole grains? Eating small, frequent, healthy meals or snacks will keep your energy up and make you less likely to overeat at your next meal.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Eating For Your Eye Health - FN709
We cannot change our genetic inheritance, but we can exercise and eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exercise Your Brain - FN1431
Physical activity helps maintain good blood flow to the brain. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that most adults get 30 minutes of moderate activity most days, preferably every day. Short segments of physical activity (such as three 10-minute walks) count toward the goal. Stimulate your brain by adding variety to your activities. Try a new activity, alternate activities throughout the week or take a new route when you walk or jog. Routine activities don’t challenge your brain, so mix it up a little.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exploring MyPlate: Budgeting Total Calories - FN720
Each person has a daily calorie budget. Calories are units of energy. You spend calories to maintain body functions and provide energy for physical activity. If you take in more calories than you burn, you may “bank” the extra as body fat.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exploring MyPlate: Find Your Balance Between Food and Physical Activity - FN721
Do you consider yourself to be physically active? You probably are more active than you think. According to the MyPlate recommendations at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov, being physically active is “movement of the body that uses energy.” Calories are units of energy. You use up calories when you are active. The more time and intensity you put into an activity, the more calories you burn.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exploring MyPlate: Focus on Fruits - FN722
Fruits are a great source of vitamins, minerals, fiber and phytochemicals (“phyto” means plant). The usual sweetness of fruits makes them an enjoyable food.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exploring MyPlate: Get Your Calcium-rich Foods - FN723
The dairy group is an important part of the new food icon at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov . MyPlate provides individual recommendations based on age, sex and activity level for each group. The online tool can help you with an eating plan personalized for you.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exploring MyPlate: Go Lean with Protein - FN724
Protein is important to have in your diet because it plays a part in the health and maintenance of the body. Choosing protein foods that are lean and low in cholesterol will give you the needed nutrients without the extra fat.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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