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Exploring North Dakota's Foodways: Germans from Russia - FN1940
These recipes are part of the rich heritage of Germans from Russia. The recipes have been modified to create healthier options for salads, rolls, soups, main dishes and desserts.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Field to Fork: Summer Squash! - FN1837
Field to Fork is a program to provide information about growing, transporting, processing and preserving specialty-crop fruits and vegetables safely.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Got Calcium? - FN587
This publication highlights the importance of calcium in your diet. It includes daily calcium recommendations, the amount of calcium in common foods, and suggestions for increasing calcium in your diet.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Can We Talk About Folic Acid - FN704
What is It? OK, so you’ll think about taking folic acid, but what is it exactly? Folic acid is a human-made form of the B vitamin folate, and is necessary for making new, healthy cells in the body. Everyone Needs It Recent studies have shown that folic acid may reduce the risk of cardiac disease and certain types of cancers. Some studies suggest it also might help lower the risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exercise Your Brain - FN1431
Physical activity helps maintain good blood flow to the brain. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that most adults get 30 minutes of moderate activity most days, preferably every day. Short segments of physical activity (such as three 10-minute walks) count toward the goal. Stimulate your brain by adding variety to your activities. Try a new activity, alternate activities throughout the week or take a new route when you walk or jog. Routine activities don’t challenge your brain, so mix it up a little.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Safe Food for Babies and Children: Heating Solid Food Safely - FN715
Whether warming bottles or solid foods, it is ALWAYS important to use safe heating practices to keep your baby happy and healthy. Although you may be an expert at feeding your little one, remember that babysitters and family members may not know how to heat bottles and food correctly. Leaving complete instructions in a handy location, such as on the refrigerator door, may help you and the caregiver feel comfortable and relaxed come feeding time.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Sports Supplements: Play the Game Right - FN1399
An athlete usually needs to increase his/her energy intake compared with the energy used. Athletes also require more water, protein, vitamins and minerals (especially iron and calcium). Before you stock up on these expensive helpers, remember that just eating more nutritious food usually is cheaper and easier.
Located in Landing Pages / Health and Fitness
Eat Smart: Enjoy Healthier Snacks at Work - FN1398
Are you tempted by bowls of candy and trays of cookies at work? Say no to secondhand sweets, and think twice about the food you offer at meetings and around the office. Are you eating enough fruits, vegetables and whole grains? Eating small, frequent, healthy meals or snacks will keep your energy up and make you less likely to overeat at your next meal.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exploring MyPlate: Vary Your Veggies - FN727
Vegetables are a nutritional bargain. Most vegetables are naturally low in calories and fat and naturally have no cholesterol. Eating vegetables rich in potassium, such as sweet potatoes, white beans and tomato products, might help decrease bone loss.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exploring MyPlate: Make at Least Half Your Grains Whole Grains - FN726
The food icon at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov recommends that at least half of the grain foods in your diet bewhole grains.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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