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NDSU Corn Silage Meeting Set

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Interest in corn silage as feed for cattle is growing. (NDSU photo) Interest in corn silage as feed for cattle is growing. (NDSU photo)
Producers can learn about growing corn for silage and feeding corn silage to cattle.

Producers will have an opportunity to learn more about growing corn for silage and feeding corn silage to cattle during a program North Dakota State University Extension is hosting Jan. 30 at NDSU’s North Central Research Extension Center (NCREC) near Minot.

“As corn production has expanded in the state, so has corn silage for cattle feed,” says John Dhuyvetter, Extension livestock systems specialist at the center. “With larger operations with bigger herds, declining hay production and improved corn yields, silage is a growing trend.”

The two-hour program will start at 10:30 a.m. Presenters will cover several key aspects of silage, including growing a good corn crop, harvesting and storing corn silage, feeding silage to cattle and the economics of corn silage production.

“This information will be helpful for new producers or those interested in adding silage to their feeding program,” says Paige Brummund, an NDSU Extension agent in Ward County.

Presenters will include Joel Ransom, Extension agronomist; Karl Hoppe, Extension livestock systems specialist at NDSU’s Carrington Research Extension Center; Dhuyvetter; Brummund; and Lynsey Aberle, Farm Business Management instructor at the NCREC.

The meeting is free of charge. For more information, contact Brummund at 701-857-6444 or paige.f.brummund@ndsu.edu, or Dhuyvetter at 701-857-7682 or john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu.


NDSU Agriculture Communication - Jan. 4, 2019

Source:John Dhuyvetter, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu
Source:Paige Brummund, 701-857-6444, paige.f.brummund@ndsu.edu
Editor:Ellen Crawford, 701-231-5391, ellen.crawford@ndsu.edu
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