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Fast Fiber Facts (FN1460)

The National Institutes of Health recommends 20 to 35 grams of fiber daily for older children, adolescents and adults. Increase your fiber intake slowly, and drink plenty of water to avoid digestive upset.

Julie Garden-Robinson, Ph.D., L.R.D., Food and Nutrition Specialist



 

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How Much Fiber Do You Need?

The National Institutes of Health recommends 20 to 35 grams of fiber daily for older children, adolescents and adults. The Mayo Clinic has the following recommendations:

Fiber Recommendations

Source: Mayo Clinic

Simple Swaps to Perk Up the Fiber in Your Diet

Higher Fiber Choices

Remember to increase your fiber intake slowly, and drink plenty of water to avoid digestive upset.

Your Fiber-food Hit Parade

To learn more about your food choices, compare Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods. The food label can state that a product is “a good source” of fiber if the food has 2.5 grams to 4.9 grams of fiber per serving. The package can claim “high in,” “rich in” or “excellent source of” fiber if the food provides 5 grams per serving.

 Fruits

(2 grams or more fiber per serving, about ½ cup)

Apple w/skin
Blueberries
Banana
Prunes
Strawberries
Orange
Pear
Raspberries
Raisins

Vegetables

(2 grams or more fiber per serving, about ½ cup cooked)

Broccoli
Peas
Carrots
Brussel sprouts
Corn
Potato with skin
Spinach

Legumes

(4 grams or more fiber per serving, about ½ cup)

Lentils
Pinto beans
Kidney beans
Dried peas
Lima beans
Navy beans
Baked beans
Peanuts

Grains

(1 gram or more fiber per serving, about 1 ounce)

Whole Wheat
Rye
Pumpernickel
Cracked wheat
Bran muffins
Brown rice
Whole-wheat pasta

Breakfast cereals vary in their fiber content. Read the Nutrition Facts labels to compare your choices. Whole-grain cereals usually are higher in fiber.

Materials were partially funded by the USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

Source: Content adapted from “Harvest Health at Home: Eating for the Second 50 Years,” North Dakota State University Extension Service; authored by Karen Heller, Susan J. Crockett and Joyce Merkel.

Reviewed July 2012

 

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