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Now Serving: More Whole Fruits and Vegetables - FN696
Family meals give parents/caregivers a chance to be good nutrition role models for children. Whether you’re sharing a meal at a park, in a car or at the family table, children who eat with their families eat a more nutritious diet. They eat more fruits and vegetables and other nutritious foods. Shared meals give families a chance to reconnect and talk about the events of their day. Children can learn communication skills, manners and their families’ values as they share food. Sharing meals also creates memories that will last a lifetime. Keep mealtime pleasant and allow enough time to eat because children eat better in a relaxed setting.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Now Serving: More Whole Grains - FN695
Children who eat more often with their families eat a healthier diet, including more grains, fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods. Grain foods, such as pasta, bread and rice, provide energy, vitamins and minerals. USDA’s MyPlate recommends that we make at least half our grains whole. The recommendations for grain foods are in “ounce equivalents.” Enjoy 3 or more ounce equivalents of whole-grain foods every day.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Now Serving: Breakfast - FN694
Enjoying more family meals adds up to better nutrition, stronger family bonds and children who are less likely to participate in risky behavior. Be flexible with meal schedules and locations of your family meals. If evenings are too hectic, would a regular family breakfast work for you?
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Now Serving: Shopping for Family Meals - FN693
Enjoying more family meals takes a little planning, but it’s worth the effort. Children who eat with their families do better in school, are less likely to take part in risky behavior (such as smoking and drinking alcohol) and are less likely to have symptoms of depression. Children who eat more family meals have an overall healthier diet, compared with children who eat fewer family meals. They eat more fruits, vegetables, grains and calcium-rich foods, and they drink fewer soft drinks. Enjoy more family meals by taking some time to plan your menus and your shopping trips. Involve your family in menu planning, shopping, preparation and cleanup. Children can learn valuable life skills, such as cooking and communication skills, when helping in the kitchen. They learn to appreciate a variety of foods as they help plan and shop for meals.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Ingredient Substitutions - FN198
Have you ever been all set to prepare a food and suddenly discovered you were missing a certain ingredient? Sometimes it is inconvenient to go to the store to purchase the necessary ingredient. It may be more convenient to try a substitute from supplies available in your kitchen.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Mix It Up to Expand Your Gift-giving Dollar With Food Mixes in a Jar - FN1494
When the holiday season rolls around, many family budgets become strained. With a long list of family and friends, finding enough money to go around may be challenging. To help reduce the stress of your next holiday season, try making gifts instead of purchasing them.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Creating an Omelet - FN1650
Use your creativity and the foods in your pantry, refrigerator or freezer to make a delicious omelet following these easy steps.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Creating a Stir-fry - FN1649
You don’t have to eat at a restaurant to enjoy a delicious stir-fry. Try making your own stir-fry using the foods in your pantry, refrigerator or freezer. You can start with fresh foods or use frozen vegetables.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Creating a Soup - FN1648
A steaming bowl of soup is a hearty, healthful meal. You can use food from your pantry, freezer or leftovers from your refrigerator to make a tasty soup in about 30 minutes following these easy steps. Each pot of soup serves about four adults. The nutritional value varies depending on the ingredients you choose.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Creating a Casserole - FN1647
"What’s for dinner?” If you sometimes answer the question, “I have no idea!” then check out these creative ideas. This publication includes ways to use ingredients in your cupboard or freezer, or leftovers in your refrigerator. You can make a satisfying and economical meal for your family in seven easy steps.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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