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Identification and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) - W1132
Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Incorporating Cover Crops (SF1901)
Science-based information and farmers use of cover crops in North Dakota are presented in this short booklet. The goal is to provide both a starting point for farmer use of cover crops and also tips to fine tune cover crops to achieve on-farm goals.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Japanese Beetle in North Dakota (E1631 (Revised))
This publication describes the identification, biology, damage and pest management strategies for control of the Japanese beetle. In 2012, Japanese beetle was detect at several locations across North Dakota. This revised publication summarizes where it has be intercepted and is likely established in North Dakota
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Wheat Stem Sawfly - E1479
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of wheat stem sawfly including identification, life cycle. crop damage, pest monitoring, cultural control, host plant resistance, biological control and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Flea Beetles in Canola E1234 (Revised October 2017)
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of flea beetles in canola including identification, life cycle, crop damage, trapping, field scouting, economic threshold, cultural control, host plant resistance, biological control, and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Pea Leaf Weevil in North Dakota (E1879)
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of pea leaf weevil including host plants (field peas and faba beans), geographic range, identification, life cycle, crop damage, monitoring, economic threshold, cultural control, and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of the Wheat Midge in North Dakota - E1330
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of wheat midge including identification, life cycle, crop damage, pheromone trapping, degree day modeling, field scouting, economic threshold, cultural methods biological control and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Alfalfa Weevil in North Dakota - E1676
Identification and biology of the alfalfa weevil is discussed. When and how to scout, and use of economic thresholds for making management decisions. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies are discussed including biological control, cultural control and insecticidal control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Spotted Wing Drosophila in North Dakota - E1715
Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) is a vinegar fly that was first confirmed in ND in 2013 as an invasive pest of soft-skinned fruit crops. The SWD lays its eggs in healthy, ripening fruits. Then larvae hatch from eggs and feed on the fruit causing spoilage. Identification, life cycle and pest management strategies are discussed.
Located in Landing Pages / Gardens, Lawns & Trees
Integrated Pest Management of Sunflower Insect Pests - E1457
Sunflowers can be a high-risk crop because of potential losses from diseases, insects, birds and weeds. These potential risks require that growers follow integrated pest management (IPM) practices.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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