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Documentation for Suspected Herbicide Drift Damage - WC751
Herbicide drift to nontarget plants can cause damage suffi cient to result in a signifi cant monetary loss. Documentation of chemical damage is required if compensation for loss will be pursued. In addition, establish the source of drift and amount of loss caused by the damage.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Leafy Spurge Identification and Chemical Control - W765
Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is a widely established perennial weed in North Dakota, infesting approximately 990,000 acres of land in 2005 (North Dakota Department of Agriculture survey). The leafy spurge infestation in North Dakota seems to have peaked at about 1.5 million acres in 2000 and 2001. The decline thereafter has been a result of an effective control program initiated in the early 1980s. Prior to this control program, leafy spurge acreage doubled every 10 years from 1950 to 1985. Despite the decline in acreage, the widespread infestation continues to cost the state more than $75 million annually in lost production.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Identification and Control of Invasive and Troublesome Weeds in North Dakota - W1411
Th is publication is intended to help land managers properly identify and control noxious and invasive weeds found in the state. Th e current list of 11 noxious weeds are included, as well as species listed by various counties as noxious. Other species included are either invasive weeds found in bordering states with the potential to move into North Dakota or are commonly misidentifi ed native species that do not require control eff orts, such as the native thistles.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2016 Weed Control Guide - W253
The information in this guide provides a summary of herbicide uses in crops grown in North Dakota and is based on federal and state herbicide labels, research at ND Ag. Experiment Stations, and information from the North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Perennial and Biennial Thistle Control - W799
Thistles are especially troublesome following cool, wet summers and falls, when seed production and seedling establishment are high. An integrated weed control program that combines chemical, cultural (such as crop rotation or grass competition), mechanical and biological methods is most likely to be successful.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Identification and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) - W1132
Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Know Your Knapweeds - W1146
North Dakota is being threatened by three noxious weeds that could infest more acreage in the state and at a faster rate than leafy spurge. Members of this trio include spotted, diffuse, and Russian knapweed. These three knapweeds already infest more acreage than leafy spurge in Montana and Minnesota, and have been found in over 25 counties in North Dakota. Knapweeds are related to thistles and can spread even faster.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2012 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticde Use in Minnesota and North Dakota - E1640
The 2012 dry bean grower survey is the 23rd annual assessment of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Growing Lentil in North Dakota - A1636
An overview of lentil production for specialty crop producers, including weed control, diseases, harvesting and references. Lentil production in North Dakota primarily has been confined to the western part of the state because disease is an issue under higher moisture conditions. Lentil is an excellent rotational crop. Production of lentil or other legumes in a diverse cropping system may improve soil health, and provides for an opportunity to control problem weeds such as downy brome.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa Lam.) - W842
Spotted knapweed is an aggressive, introduced weed species that rapidly invades pasture, rangeland and fallow land and causes a serious decline in forage and crop production. The weed is a prolific seed producer with 1000 or more seeds per plant. Seed remains viable in the soil five years or more, so infestations may occur a number of years after vegetative plants have been eliminated. Spotted knapweed has few natural enemies and is consumed by livestock only when other vegetation is unavailable. The plant releases a toxin that reduces growth of forage species. Areas heavily infested with spotted knapweed often must be reseeded once the plant is controlled.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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