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Quality Forage: Storage, Sampling and Measuring - AS-1255
Using proper sampling techniques is essential to obtain a representative sample for moisture determination. For hay, the procedure used will vary, depending on whether sampling is being done from the windrow, bale or stack.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
What is the Value of a Standing Corn Crop for Silage? - EC1343
Corn for silage sometimes is sold standing in the field and farmers frequently ask how to determine a fair price for the standing crop. EC1343 provides some guidelines for estimating the value of a standing corn crop.
Located in Landing Pages / Farm Economics & Management
Farm Management Planning Guide Projected Budgets for Irrigated Crops Eastern North Dakota - EC1662
These crop budgets provide an estimate of cost and returns for producing various crops under irrigation. The budgets are developed for a multicounty region. Soil type and productivity, as well as weather conditions, vary considerably across the region. These budgets are intended to be used as a guide. Producers should develop their own budgets.
Located in Landing Pages / Farm Economics & Management
Farm Management Planning Guide Projected Budgets for Irrigated Crops Western North Dakota - EC1663
These crop budgets provide an estimate of cost and returns for producing various crops under irrigation. The budgets are developed for a multicounty region. Soil type and productivity, as well as weather conditions, vary considerably across the region. These budgets are intended to be used as a guide. Producers should develop their own budgets.
Located in Landing Pages / Farm Economics & Management
Harvesting, Storing and Feeding Corn as Earlage - AS1490
Earlage is growing in popularity in this region of the country because it allows the production of a relatively high-energy feed product, which can be harvested, stored and fed much like corn silage, using the same types of equipment that are used to produce corn silage.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Quality Forage: Corn Silage Management - AS1253
Silage can be made from many different crops, although the ability to make good silage is limited at times. In North Dakota, corn is a widely used crop for silage. Worldwide, corn silage is one of the most important forges used for livestock.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Quality Forage: Stressed or Damaged Crops - AS1256
Stressed crops resulting from unfavorable weather conditions require special management considerations. Yield and quality of frost and drought-damaged crops usually are maximized when harvested as silage.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
North Dakota Fertilizer Recommendation Tables and Equations - SF882
The soil test recommendation tables here are based on field research data obtained in North Dakota, South Dakota, western Minnesota and the Canadian Prairie Provinces.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Quality Forage: Haylage and Other Fermented Forages - AS1252
Cutting fresh forage at the optimal stage of maturity and feeding it directly to animals year-round would supply the highest-quality and most palatable feed possible. In addition, field and storage losses would be the least of all methods of forage utilization. However, fluctuations in seasonal growth and plant maturity make harvesting and storing forages necessary to maximize quality and productivity.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Quality Forage: Silage Fermentation and Preservation - AS1254
High-quality silage is achieved when lactic acid is the predominant acid produced because it is the most efficient fermentation acid and will drop the pH of the silage the fastest. The faster the fermentation is completed, the more nutrients will be retained in the silage.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
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