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Safe Food for Babies and Children: Making Homemade Baby Food for Babies 6 Months and Older (FN1848)
This handout provides general guidance for making pureed foods at home, which can be a money-saving option or a personal preference. Making your own baby food has several advantages. You will expose your baby to more flavors, which could allow for a more adventurous eater. You also can limit sugar and salt to provide good nutrition for your baby.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Jerky Making: Producing a Traditional Food With Modern Processes FN580 (Revised)
Jerky is a nutrient-dense, convenient and shelf-stable meat product that has grown in popularity world wide. Derived from the Spanish word “charqui,” which describes dried meat strips, jerky may be produced using a combination of curing, smoking and drying procedures. Traditionally jerky was made by the use of sun, wind, and smoke from fires as a way to Jerky is a nutrient-dense, convenient, shelf-stable meat product that can be made from just about any type of raw meat ingredients. Its name is derived from the Spanish word “charqui,” which describes dried meat strips. Jerky is produced using combinations of curing, smoking and drying procedures.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Wild Side of the Menu No. 2 - Field to Freezer - FN125
Each year, hunting of animals and birds is increasingly popular, but often the game is wasted because of improper handling in the field. Nutritionally, game meats rate as well as domestic animals and may prove to be a healthier source of nutrition. Wild game that is properly treated in the field and correctly cooked to enhance its distinctive flavors holds a special place for many gourmets. The purpose of this publication is to describe how to properly handle your game from harvesting through processing.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Wild Side of the Menu No. 3 - Preservation of Game Meats and Fish - FN155
Wild game provides wholesome, nourishing food, but it should be handled and preserved carefully to retain quality. Like domestic meat, wild meat is perishable, so care is needed to maintain its safety. The purpose of this publication is to provide recommendations for safely preserving game meats and fish for later enjoyment. Freezing meat and fish is the most accepted way to maintain top quality. Other methods for preserving game meats include curing and smoking, drying, corning, canning and sausage making. Fish also may be pickled or canned.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Sauerkraut: From Garden to Table - FN433
Making sauerkraut is often part of introductory classes in microbiology. To avoid a "science experiment gone wrong" at home, follow the recommendations in this publication from garden to table.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Food Storage Guide Answers the Question . . . (FN579 Revised)
This publication provides handling tips and recommendations for storing food in your cupboards, refrigerator or freezer.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Home Canning Meat Poultry, Red Meats, Game and Seafood - FN188
Poultry, red meats, game and seafoods are low-acid foods and must be processed in a pressure canner to assure their safety. This publications provides general tips for high-quality products, general procedures and recipes.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
From The Garden or Orchard to the Table: Jams and Jellies from North Dakota Fruits - FN590
What kinds of fruit can be successfully grown in North Dakota? What are some tested and tasty recipes for making the preserves? That’s what this circular is all about — growing and preserving the fruits of summer!
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Why Add Lemon Juice to Tomatoes and Salsa Before Canning? (FN1396)
You may have heard that adding lemon juice, citric acid or another acid to tomatoes before canning is important, but maybe you are not sure why. It’s all about pH.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Questions and Answers About Using a Pressure Canner - FN1415
Pressure canning is recommended for low-acid foods. Low acid foods are not acidic enough to prevent the growth of bacteria and should be processed at temperatures of 240 degrees to 250 degrees, which is attainable with pressure canners. Low-acid foods include; red meats, seafood, poultry, milk, all fresh vegetables except for most tomatoes.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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