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A Cow-calf Producer's Guide to Custom Feeding - AS1162
This publication will discuss items that a cow-calf operator should consider before choosing a feedlot to custom feed cattle. Custom feeding refers to the practice of sending calves, stockers or yearlings to a commercial feed yard for feeding to slaughter weights. Custom feeding is not without risks. It should be viewed as a potential means to add value to your calf crop and/or evaluate the genetic merit of your cow herd.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Cattleman's Guide to Feedlot Terminology - AS1161
This publication is intended to familiarize cow-calf producers with the terminology that feedlot managers may use when discussing custom feeding and feedlots.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
2015 North Dakota Beef Report - AS1775
This report contains several small papers from researchers in ND on current research results related to beef cattle. The report is posted as a complete report as well as, individual reports.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Quality Forage: Storage, Sampling and Measuring - AS-1255
Using proper sampling techniques is essential to obtain a representative sample for moisture determination. For hay, the procedure used will vary, depending on whether sampling is being done from the windrow, bale or stack.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Utilizing Corn Residue in Beef Cattle Diets - AS1548
Corn residue is a useful feedstuff for beef cattle. Producers should consider incorporating these fee resources into their grazing and feeding programs to reduce the cost of production.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Feeding Sugar Beet Byproducts to Cattle - AS1365
The sugar beet industry produces a wide variety of useful byproducts for livestock feeders. The decision to incorporate sugar beet byproducts into diets should be based on economics, local availability, and feasibility of storage, handling and feeding. For the wet byproducts, careful attention should be given to transportation costs and storage. In addition, rations containing sugar beet byproducts should be balanced properly to achieve targeted livestock performance.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Feeding Coproducts of the Ethanol Industry to Beef Cattle - AS1242
Coproducts from the ethanol industry are useful feed ingredients for beef cattle producers. Corn distillers grains are high in energy and protein and can be fed wet or dry in many different types of rations.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Field Pea Grain and Forage for Beef Cattle - AS1301
This publication provides nutritional value and feeding recomendations for field pea grain and forage. It reviews research feeding pea to beef cattle in production stages of creep feed, backgrounding, finishing and supplementation to cows. It also provides background in field pea production.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Forage Nutrition for Ruminants - AS1250
Plants utilized in the feeding of livestock have long been a fundamental link in the food chain. Native grasses supported grazing animals well before man began to domesticate livestock. Forages have always been an extremely important source of nutrients in livestock rations. Additionally, they provide fiber in the ration which enhances proper digestion in forage-consuming animals. Through their conversion into milk and meat products, forages continue to be one of the primary sources of nourishment in the human diet.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Sunflower Meal in Beef Cattle Diets - AS1623
Sunflower meal is the fourth largest source of protein supplement used for livestock behind soybean, cottonseed and canola meals (Hesley, 1994). Sunflower meal is the residual product when the oil fraction is removed from the black oil seeds by “crushing,” or more specifically, prepress solvent extraction. The supply of sunflower meal in the U.S. varies by year according to acres and yield of sunflowers harvested, with some seasonal variation in output. Most sunflowers are processed from October through March. Oil sunflowers generally are grown in the Great Plains region of the U.S.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
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