NDSU Extension - Williams County

Accessibility


Articles - 2010

Required Fuel Spill Plans Part of Wheat Show & Glyphosate Affects Lentil Germ

In recent months information relating to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced a requirement that farms write and implement a Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) plan. For years the State Seed Department and others have been telling us that glyphosate can have a detrimental effect on seed germination. The departments testing laboratory is finding more of a problem on the germination of lentil seed.

Required Fuel Spill Plans Part of Wheat Show & Glyphosate Affects Lentil Germ - Read More…

Colorado Veterinarian to Speak on Calving Made Easy & Pulse Day

As the New Year begins many cowherds in this area will be entering their third trimester of gestation. Along with this comes increased anticipation of the new calf crop and anxiety over possible calving problems. To help livestock producers prepare for the 2011 calving season several county agents in western North Dakota have coordinated efforts to have Dr. Robert Mortimer of Colorado State University (CSU) speak at four locations: Dickinson, New Town, Minot and Williston.

Colorado Veterinarian to Speak on Calving Made Easy & Pulse Day - Read More…

Klinefelter - Keynote Speaker for Wheat Show

Danny Klinefelter, well known agriculture economist from Texas A&M University, will be the featured speaker during the 58th National Hard Spring Wheat Show scheduled February 7, 8 and 9 at Williston, North Dakota. He will speak on two issues. They are: 1) Twelve Best Management Practices, and 2) Being Prepared to Borrow in a RiskManagement Environment.

Klinefelter - Keynote Speaker for Wheat Show - Read More…

Ultra-Sound Technology Used on 4-H Steers

Steers exhibited by Williams County 4-H members during the Upper Missouri Valley Fair have been scanned using the ultra-sound technology. This enables us to study the carcass merits of an animal before it is harvested.

Ultra-Sound Technology Used on 4-H Steers - Read More…

Cropping Challenges for 2011 & Introductory Pesticide Training

Through interactive video technology Williston will host a “Cropping Challenges” meeting on Wednesday, December 8, 1:30 p.m., in the Conference Room of the Williams County Courthouse. Commercial or public applicators and dealers who are new to the pesticide certification program can save some time and expense by participating in one of five statewide internet videocasts scheduled this winter and next spring. Dates of these videocasts are December 20, January 24, March 11, April 11 and May 31, all scheduled 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., CT.

Cropping Challenges for 2011 & Introductory Pesticide Training - Read More…

2010 Durum Quality Average But Highly Varied

Recently I received a quality report of the 2010 durum wheat produced in Montana and North Dakota. Because the northwest corner of North Dakota has transitioned into being the largest durum production area of the state, I want to share some of the basic but important features of the 2010 crop as reported through a survey conducted by the North Dakota Wheat Commission. First of all, the 2010 northern U.S. crop is estimated to be roughly 15 percent larger than the bountiful harvest of 2009. The larger production is attributed to more acres being planted and once again record yields due to a very favorable growing season.

2010 Durum Quality Average But Highly Varied - Read More…

Canada Thistle/Leafy Spurge Top Weed Threats & Tree Leaf Drop

This past March the Williams County Weed Board conducted a mail survey of landowners, users of the weed board’s programs and township officials. One of the survey questions related to the threat of the weeds classified noxious in North Dakota. No one likes to see leaf drop this time of the year. Some of us have a very high emotional value for trees. Maybe it is because there are so few of them in this area compared to those our friends have in the eastern part of North Dakota.

Canada Thistle/Leafy Spurge Top Weed Threats & Tree Leaf Drop - Read More…

Tax Information To Be Shared & Texas Professor to Speak During Wheat Show

Once again we are approaching that time of year when most people begin to have some thoughts about income tax reports. Although there is considerable time before such needs to be filed with our state and federal governments, there are about 45 days remaining to take action to minimize tax liability. Dr. Danny Klinefelter, Professor and Extension Economist at Texas A&M University, will be one of the featured speakers during the 58th National Hard Spring Wheat Show scheduled February 7, 8 and 9 at Williston.

Tax Information To Be Shared & Texas Professor to Speak During Wheat Show - Read More…

Farms Recognized for Conservation; Tree Windbreak Renovation & Tree Plantings for 2011

This past week the Williams County Soil Conservation District held its annual banquet to give special recognition to farm operators who do an outstanding job of protecting land and water resources. All farmers and ranchers understand the importance of trees which provide critical protection for farmsteads, livestock and even crops. It’s not too early to begin planning your 2011 tree planting. In order to plant trees in the spring of 2011, you need to contact the Williams County Soil Conservation District as soon as possible.

Farms Recognized for Conservation; Tree Windbreak Renovation & Tree Plantings for 2011 - Read More…

Transplanting Woody Plants - When?

There are many variables to consider when answering this question. There is one thing for sure. That is, regardless of the time, the process of transplanting adds stress to trees and most of the trees we transplant are not native to this area.

Transplanting Woody Plants - When? - Read More…

Cattle Type Should Determine Feeding System

Within the next 60 days most of our spring born beef calves will be weaned from their dams, marketed or placed in the home corral for backgrounding and sold at a later date at heavier weights. There are many different methods or systems of backgrounding or growing beef cattle. Each has advantages and disadvantages. These pros and cons must be weighed by producers for deciding which system is right.

Cattle Type Should Determine Feeding System - Read More…

Lamb Prices at Record High & Let Corn Silage Cook

The principles of supply/demand are certainly impacting the current lamb market. Below are some numbers gleaned from a recent report of the Livestock Marketing Information Center based in Denver. A major goal of making corn silage is to reduce oxygen and raise acidity rapidly so that lactic acid bacteria grow to stabilize and preserve or “pickle” the silage.

Lamb Prices at Record High & Let Corn Silage Cook - Read More…

Women in Ag & Selling vs. Retaining

Mary asked me to put a plug in for the Women in Ag Conference scheduled October 29-30 at Dickinson, North Dakota. I realize the event is being held a far distance from here, but the agenda looks to be well worth the special effort. The majority of U.S. 2010 calf crop will be weaned over the next 60 days. Many cattlemen in this region have made it a practice to retain ownership for another 30 to 90 days. This allows producers to add more weight to the calves and take advantage of premiums frequently offered for weaned calves.

Women in Ag & Selling vs. Retaining - Read More…

Cattle On Tour, Acreage Report & Optimism Realistic

Some of the best cattle in the area will be under the spotlight when their owners put them on display during the All Breeds Cattle Tour scheduled Tuesday, October 5. Cory Paryzek, Director of the USDA Farm Service Agency of Williams and Divide Counties, recently sent a summary of 2010 crop acreage. Globally 75 million people are being added to our planet’s population each year. Along with this population increase the agricultural branch of the United Nations estimates that global beef production will need to double by 2050 just to keep pace with rising incomes and populations.

Cattle On Tour, Acreage Report & Optimism Realistic - Read More…

New Durum Variety & New Winter Wheat

Since the July Field Day conducted at the Williston Research Center there have been several growers inquiring about the new durum variety named Tioga. It was developed by the NDSU Durum Breeding Program and released by the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station this past winter. Wheat growers who have interest in winter wheat will be pleased to hear that Leon Helstad, Williston has agreed to a contract with the Williams County Agricultural Improvement Association and the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station to increase a new variety of winter wheat named Decade.

New Durum Variety & New Winter Wheat - Read More…

Sprouted Grain Has Good Feed Value

The current weather pattern is a bit spooky. Rainfall during much of May resulted in delayed plantings and now harvest is well behind normal. Besides causing a discoloration of grain kernels, this wet weather can cause grain to sprout. We can only hope for the sun to shine soon.

Sprouted Grain Has Good Feed Value - Read More…

Lawn Renovation Tips & Fungicide Increased Barley Yields

As the summer days come to a close some areas of the lawn may show signs of stress due to heavy traffic of humans or pets, and maybe lack of water. Most compacted areas can be renovated with a machine which pulls plugs out of the soil. Disease, mostly of the fungal type, has been a threat to crops for many years. Most fungus organisms prefer moist and moderate temperatures to propagate. However, based on both public and private research data and early yield reports of producers, it appears 2010 was a profitable year to apply fungicides.

Lawn Renovation Tips & Fungicide Increased Barley Yields - Read More…

New Nitrogen Recommendations Based on Economics

During the Wheat Show held last February, Dave Franzen, NDSU Extension Soils Specialist, explained the new recommended nitrogen rates for spring wheat and durum. The new rates are the result of research in North Dakota since 1971.

New Nitrogen Recommendations Based on Economics - Read More…

From Trees to Cows

Diversity will best describe the topics in this week’s column. Let me first cover a tree problem, and then I will hit the beef cattle market outlook as it pertains to our cow/calf industry.

From Trees to Cows - Read More…

Mixture or Rotations and Hackberry Suggested

Herbicide mixtures appear to be more effective than rotations in slowing the evolution of herbicide resistance, according to a report in Weed Technology. Herbicide rotation is now the most common form of herbicide resistance management practice among farmers.The two most popular and adaptable trees for this area are no longer recommended for new plantings. For several decades now the beautiful American elm has been attacked by a fungus disease spread by a beetle. Now the hardy ash tree is being threatened by a boring bark beetle.

Mixture or Rotations and Hackberry Suggested - Read More…

Why Winter Wheat

In the mid 80’s winter wheat production in Williams County was quite popular. According to the North Dakota Agriculture Statistics Service, crop producers in the county harvested about 25,000 acres in 1986. That was over three times the amount harvested the previous year.

Why Winter Wheat - Read More…

Off-Station Crop Variety Tour, Cost Share Herbicide Available & Blossom End-Rot of Tomatoes

If you missed the annual field day of the NDSU Williston Research Center or would like to get more information on the cereal and pulse crops grown in this area, plan to attend the tour of the off-station research and demonstration plot which is located on the north side of U.S. Highway 2 five miles west of Ray. Jim Basaraba, Williams County Weed Control Officer, asked me to remind landowners that the county weed board has authorized the cost-share of the herbicide Milestone. I don’t know of anyone who does not cherish the taste of a fresh home-grown tomato. However, getting them to the table can be challenging.

Off-Station Crop Variety Tour, Cost Share Herbicide Available & Blossom End-Rot of Tomatoes - Read More…

Glyphosate Herbicides for Harvest

An unusual amount of growing season rainfall and relatively cool growing conditions so far point to another bountiful harvest. My recent travels around the county show delayed maturity of crops and very likely a later than normal harvest. I am sure many growers will consider some type of herbicide burn down in an effort to begin the harvest season as early as possible and avoid harvest that could possibly extend into late September and early October.

Glyphosate Herbicides for Harvest - Read More…

Fungal Disease Can Threaten Pulse Crops & Wheat Protein Enhancement

The three pulse crops (peas, lentils and chickpeas) are all susceptible to ascochyta, a fungal disease that can affect leaves, stems, flowers, pods and seeds. Sam Markell, NDSU Extension Plant Pathologist, suggests several factors when considering a fungicide application. First, the more ascochyta you have at early bloom on the lower canopy, the greater the risk. According to Dave Franzen, NDSU Extension Soils Specialist, the time for post-N wheat protein enhancement is immediately after flowering until the wheat berries begin to turn milky.

Fungal Disease Can Threaten Pulse Crops & Wheat Protein Enhancement - Read More…

No Insecticide Solution for Wheat Sawflies

For some wheat growers, the wheat stem sawfly has moved from the category of a nuisance pest to a more serious category of causing severe economic losses. In this area of the state, producer reports indicate sawfly populations are gradually increasing.

No Insecticide Solution for Wheat Sawflies - Read More…

Late Planting of Wheat & Continued Scouting Advised

The unusually cool and wet conditions during May have resulted in some late crop plantings. Some acres are yet to be planted and may not be planted. Although the threat of insects to our crops appears to be less than last year, continued vigilance is suggested especially for cutworms and alfalfa weevils.

Late Planting of Wheat & Continued Scouting Advised - Read More…

Butterflies Abound & Hornet Season is Here

A few folks have asked about the yellow and white butterflies which are flying around the countryside in great abundance. They are of the Pieridae family. Years ago I was stung in the neck by a yellowjacket. I thought nothing of it until feeling a “hot” sensation throughout my body and a 4-H parent noticed my face was red and very swollen. This memorable moment happened during a September reorganization meeting of a 4-H Club and landed me in the hospital.

Butterflies Abound & Hornet Season is Here - Read More…

Weevil Could Threaten 2nd Cutting & National Recession Influences Consumer Decisions

There have been years when the alfalfa weevil has devastated this forage crop, almost always the first cutting. This year development of the first cutting of alfalfa has been progressing quite well and appears to be ahead of the growing degree days (heat units) necessary for the development of the alfalfa weevil. In the last decade, there has been considerable effort within the food industry to put a brand on products in an effort to sway consumers. This method of marketing has experienced a fair amount of success, but the national recession is having a negative impact on the meat industries’ effort to build brand affinity.

Weevil Could Threaten 2nd Cutting & National Recession Influences Consumer Decisions - Read More…

Scouting for Flea Beetles; Tan Spot Management & Herbicide Rotation

Although last fall’s survey for flea beetles indicates this area should not expect a large population of the insect, growers still are advised to scout canola fields for localized infestations and not rely on the efficiency of insecticide seed treatments, especially on early planted seed. A number of fungicides are available for control of early season leaf spot diseases in wheat. Increased reliance on herbicides has tended to increase weed resistance to certain herbicides. So, weed scientists have urged the rotation of herbicide groups.

Scouting for Flea Beetles; Tan Spot Management & Herbicide Rotation - Read More…

Mushrooms & Lawn Pests; ND Waters Safe

One of the more frequent questions I receive this time of year is “What can I do to get rid of mushrooms in my lawn?” Mushrooms tend to be more of a problem this time of the year because of cool and moist conditions typical of spring. As summer temperatures arrive, they tend to disappear until the following spring. There is some good news for agriculture producers and homeowners in North Dakota who use pesticides to grow the safest food and simply make life more comfortable. The state now has three years of surface water sampling for pesticides in all major watersheds across the state.

Mushrooms & Lawn Pests; ND Waters Safe - Read More…

Plant Pests Being Found & Disease Forecasting Site Activitated

Flea beetles have already been observed on volunteer canola in the Fargo and Devils Lake areas. Then there is the wheat curl mite found in volunteer spring wheat and winter wheat in counties to the east of us. This tiny insect is responsible for the transfer of the wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) in wheat causing a yellow to brown streaking on the leaves thus reducing the vitality of the plant. Closer to home, there is the report of cutworms being found in the Ray area.

Plant Pests Being Found & Disease Forecasting Site Activitated - Read More…

Local Horseman Offers Training Clinic, Ag Transportation Manual and Project Safe Send Dates & Locations

Area youth will have a great opportunity to learn horsemanship skills from one of the very best horse trainers in the region. The handbook addresses anhydrous ammonia transportation, health card, height-weight-width-length limitations, hours of service, inspections, permits, licensing-accessories and implements of husbandry. Project Safe Send Dates and Locations Announced July 8 at Watford City is the nearest date and location for this year’s Project Safe Send. This is a program deemed to help farmers and the general public get rid of unusable pesticides safely and legally.

Local Horseman Offers Training Clinic, Ag Transportation Manual and Project Safe Send Dates & Locations - Read More…

Understanding Water Quality Reports

Water quality is important to herbicide effectiveness and spray problems. However, the issue is complex as each herbicide may respond differently to water quality. Laboratory reports will usually include pH, total dissolved solids (TDS), electrical conductivity (EC), hardness, sodium absorption ratio (SAR), residual sodium carbonate and bicarbonates.

Understanding Water Quality Reports - Read More…

Horticultural Oils Offer Some insect Relief

For many years oil based pesticides have been used to control many garden and fruit tree insects. These products first became popular as a way to control pest problems on fruit trees. Fruit trees posed a unique problem because they were susceptible to insects, but many of the effective insecticides could not be used because of the fruit’s use in human diets.

Horticultural Oils Offer Some insect Relief - Read More…

Ammonia Loss With Urea Measured

The loss of ammonia has been thought to be lower when applied at lower soil temperatures. While this may still be true, research using new ammonia measuring equipment shows substantial amounts of ammonia is lost even at temperatures near freezing.

Ammonia Loss With Urea Measured - Read More…

Tree Transplanting Guidelines

Regardless of where people live in this country, there is a high respect for trees. Besides beauty, shade and maybe food, trees offer many intangibles. For me, I think it is a sense of security. This week I want to use my column space to share some thoughts about transplanting trees. Although some species may survive transplanting any time during the year when the ground is not frozen, the preferred times for moving trees is spring after the ground thaws and before buds on the tree or shrub begin to swell.

Tree Transplanting Guidelines - Read More…

Growth Regulators Reduce Fruit Production & Black Knot on Cherry Trees

Fruit on trees adds color and interest to the home landscape. However, when mature the fruit can be messy and adds to the maintenance of the yard. The black knot disease usually requires two years to complete a life cycle. We usually recognize its presence by the second spring after infection when new fungal spores are produced.

Growth Regulators Reduce Fruit Production & Black Knot on Cherry Trees - Read More…

NDSU Weed Publication Available

The cost of controlling weeds in field crops varies with each crop; however, weed control expenses represent a substantial amount of the total direct (cash) cost, regardless of the crop. For example, weed control in small grains is likely near 20 percent compared to approximately 25 percent for pulse crops.

NDSU Weed Publication Available - Read More…

Early Application of Tree Insecticide Suggested

Controlling insects that feed under tree bark with insecticides has been and continues to be a difficult task. However, new systemics are now on the markets that give us some chance of protecting our valuable home landscape ornamentals.

Early Application of Tree Insecticide Suggested - Read More…

New Farming Practices Favor Ragweed & Local Durum Grower Recognized

As farm producers have moved to less tillage to reduce soil erosion, conserve moisture and cut costs, they are confronted with different problems. Reduced tillage or no-till practices have reduced some weed problems but also are preferences for new weeds. One of these weeds is common ragweed. It is natural for the wheat growers of North Dakota to expound on the quality of the product they produce. But just how good is it? That is one of the tasks the North Dakota Wheat Commission tries to answer through its annual quality survey and a special contest.

New Farming Practices Favor Ragweed & Local Durum Grower Recognized - Read More…

Understanding Genetic Defects in Beef Cattle

Most of us were either not around or were too young to have personal experience with the most famous genetic defect in the 20th century—snorter dwarfism. It became an issue in Angus and Hereford cattle during the 1940’s and 1950’s.

Understanding Genetic Defects in Beef Cattle - Read More…

Pesticide Certification and New Labeling

In order to purchase and apply pesticides classified as “restricted-use” farmers are required to participate in training programs which emphasize the safe application of such products which have a potential of being harmful to the applicator, public and the environment. In North Dakota, as in many states, the Extension Service is charged with the responsibility of conducting the educational efforts and certification of applicators and sellers of pesticide products.

Pesticide Certification and New Labeling - Read More…

Flea Beetle Offers Alternative to Leafy Spurge Control

Although leafy spurge has lost its status as the number one week threat in North Dakota to Canada thistle, it remains a serious impediment to the livestock sector of the state's agricultural economy. Biological control of leafy spurge was initiated in the mid 1980s.

Flea Beetle Offers Alternative to Leafy Spurge Control - Read More…

Estate Planning Seminar & New Grass Publication

Estate planning is often viewed as a difficult task thus frequently avoided. To make this task easier, staff of the North Dakota State University Development Foundation is offering a free Estate Planning Seminar for alumni and friends of the university. A select group of eight warm-season grasses which dominate North Dakota rangelands are discussed in a new publication recently released jointly by the North Dakota State University Extension Service and USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service.

Estate Planning Seminar & New Grass Publication - Read More…

Soil Health Focus of Pulse Day Information

Growers of field peas, chickpeas and lentils may want to mark Wednesday, February 24 on their calendars as the day to be in Williston (Airport International Inn) for the 10th Annual Mondak Pulse Day. This year’s line-up of topics and speakers will appeal to both the experienced and new growers as the event will focus on soil health. The agenda also includes the latest recommendations on production, marketing and utilization of pulse crops.

Soil Health Focus of Pulse Day Information - Read More…

Crop Budgets Not Rosy

Agricultural economist, Andrew Swenson and Ron Haugen of North Dakota State University, recently released their projected 2010 crop budgets for northwest North Dakota. Except for lentils, the budgets are not rosy but most crops do show a positive value for a return to labor and management.

Crop Budgets Not Rosy - Read More…

Plotting a Course for 2010

Planning for the future is a very challenging process. Some take the approach that we have little control of the future and planning is a waste of time. Because food production is so highly dependent on weather and we humans definitely have very little control over rainfall or heat units bestowed upon our crops, planning for the future does sometimes seem futile.

Plotting a Course for 2010 - Read More…

Luncheon Speakers Offer Daily Life Messages

Those attending the Wheat Show February 2nd and 3rd will have the opportunity to hear 20 speakers discuss as many topics. Folks staying for the noon lunches will be treated to some strong daily life messages from two seasoned and professionally qualified presenters.

Luncheon Speakers Offer Daily Life Messages - Read More…

Wheat Show Agenda Finalized

Recent additions to the educational program include Rebecca Bratter, Director of the U.S. Wheat Associates Policy Program and Paul Sweeney who was recently named as North Dakota’s State Conservationist for USDA’s National Resource Conservation Service (NRCS).

Wheat Show Agenda Finalized - Read More…

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.