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February 27, 2014 Meeting Minutes

SBARE Sunflower Granting Committee
Mainstay Suites, Fargo

The State Board of Agricultural Research and Education’s (SBARE) Sunflower Granting Committee met in conjunction with the National Sunflower Association’s research committee.  Voting members present were Art Ridl, Ben Vig, Jeff Oberholtzer, Arnold Woodbury, Scott Nelson and Clark Coleman. Non-voting members present were Mike Odegaard, Guy Christensen and Patrick Stolz. Also present was Lori Capouch.

Capouch provided a brief overview of the Agricultural Research Fund for the committee.

Proposals eligible for SBARE funding:

Downey Mildew: Establishment of Baseline Sensitivity to Two Fungicides and Monitoring for the Development of Fungicide Resistance and Pathogen Race Changes
Researcher: Samuel Markell
Amount requested: $23,342

The objectives of this project are 1) determine fungicide dosages to assess sensitivity (baseline) to Dynasty and Zorbec; 2) assess historic and current pathogen isolates for sensitivity to both fungicides;  3) determine if any isolates exist with resistance to either fungicide; 4) identify pathogen physiological races from across midwest to monitor development of new virulent races; and 5) educate another graduate student in sunflower pathology.

Evaluation of Fungicides for Management of Phomopsis Stem Canker
Researcher: Samuel Markell
Amount requested: $8,000

The objective of this research is to obtain fungicide efficacy and timing data that can be used to develop management recommendations for the disease.

Evaluation of commercial cultivars of oil type sunflowers against Rhizopus head rot
Researcher: Venkataramana Chapara
Amount requested: $10,000

Rhizopus head rot can be managed by certain cultural practices such as avoiding damage to the head by birds and insects, and by using sunflower cultivars that turn down their heads after flowering.  There is an imperative need to screen current commercial cultivars of oil type sunflowers to face this up-scaling problem of Rhizopus in sunflower production.

Inheritance and mapping of sunflower insect resistance traits
Researcher: Jarrad R. Prasifka
Amount requested: $16,720

The objectives of this project are 1) determine the inheritance and map genes determining glandular trichome abundance, a resistance trait for sunflower moth, by phenotypingF2 plants (HA 300 x RHA 464); and 2) determine the inheritance of resistance to red sunflower seed weevil conferred by PI 431542 using artificial infestations of adult weevils in a replicated field trial of HA 441/PI 421542 br.//HA 467; subsequently determine the feasibility of mapping this trait.

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Recalibration for Sunflowers in the Northern Plains
Researcher: Dave Franzen
Amount requested: $75,173

The objectives of this project are 1) develop modern N recommendations for the northern plains; 2) develop modern P recommendations for the northern plains; and 3) develop algorithms for using active-optical sensors to direct in-season N application to sunflower.

Enhancing Sunflower Tolerance to Water-Related Stresses via Seed Priming
Researchers: Qi Zhang and Burton Johnson
Amount requested: $14,861

The goal of this project is to evaluate the efficacy of seed priming in enhancement of drought and salinity tolerance; therefore, increasing yield and reducing management inputs in sunflower production.  To achieve this goal, the project includes three specific objectives:

    1. Standardize priming procedure in sunflower
    2. Identify priming solution(s) with optimal efficacy in enhancing germination and seedling growth of sunflower under drought and salinity conditions
    3. Determine the efficacy of seed priming in sunflower production under drought salinity conditions in the field.

Improvement of Seed Vigor and Phenolic Quality in Sunflower
Researcher: Kalidas Shetty
Amount requested: $25,270

Objectives of this research:

    1. To use natural bioprocessed elicitors to improve seed vigor and seedling emergence of sunflower comparing several commercial varieties.
    2. Stimulation of antioxidant response through redox regulation to induce better fitness and abiotic stress tolerance in sunflower varieties.
    3. To improve the yield and quality of sunflower through metabolic adjustments both in root and in shoot development comparing sunflower varieties.
    4. To improve seed phenolic-antioxidant in late stages during oil formation in seeds
    5. To improve seed phenolic in confectionary varieties for improved health related antioxidant quality.

Non-Uniform plant spacing effects on sunflower performance in the Dakotas
Researcher: Burton Johnson
Amount requested: $21,478

The study objectives are:

    1. Determine the yield response (individual plants and plots) of oilseed sunflower to non-uniform plant spacing established at/near emergence.
    2. Quantify treatment effects of non-uniform plant spacings on seed oil content, seed weight, test weight, plant height and lodging, head diameter, and note plant disease and pest incidence.
    3. Monitor treatment (non-uniform plant spacings) influence on growth and development of individual sunflower plants at several growth stages (R1, R5.1, and R9).
    4. Develop a yield model to predict non-uniform plant spacings effect on stand yield.

Support of the USDA sunflower breeding program to continue work on NSA priorities
Researcher: Brent Hulke
Amount requested: $53,459

The goal of this project is to ensure the continuation of all important sunflower breeding projects and our internally funded doubled haploid research.  Funding is required to maintain this long term research because no internal funds are available for it currently.  Funding will be used to pay for filed plots in the US for nursery and yield trial purposes and our winter nursery site in Chile. 

Funding decisions

It was moved and seconded to grant negotiated funding of up to $6,629 to the project titled “Downey Mildew: Establishment of Baseline Sensitivity to Two Fungicides and Monitoring for the Development of Fungicide Resistance and Pathogen Race Changes.”  Motion carried.

There being no further business, the SBARE committee meeting was adjourned.

 

February 23, 2011 Meeting Minutes

State Board of Agricultural Research and Education
Sunflower Granting Committee
USDA-ARS
Building, NDSU Campus

The State Board of Agricultural Research and Education’s (SBARE’s) Sunflower Granting Committee met in conjunction with the National Sunflower Association’s board.  Committee voting members present were Art Ridl, Mike Clemens, Don Schmommer, Jeff Oberholtzer, Tim DeKrey, Arnold Woodbury, and Reginal Herman.  Non-voting members present were Larry Kleingartner, Guy Christiansen and John McLean.  Also present was Lori Capouch.

The committee and board members discussed the pending research proposals.

Proposals eligible for SBARE funding:

Development of management strategies to control sunflower rust using genetic resistance and fungicides
Researchers: Sam Markell and Tom Gulya
Amount requested:  $26,160

The objectives of this project are 1) the completion of fungicide evaluation and timing; 2) an assessment of pathogen races and 3) the development of molecular markers that will aid and improve incorporation of rust resistant genes into hybrids.

Characterization of Phomopsis Species in the United States: Species Prevalence, Pathogenicity and Development of Greenhouse Screening Technique Researcher: Sam Markell
Amount requested:  $39,570

This research project has one short term and four additional long term objectives. 1) characterization of the species and their prevalence causing phomopsis on sunflowers in North America, focusing primarily on North Dakota, South Dakota and Northwest Minnesota; B) develop and test a method for screening sunflower germplasm for phomopsis in the greenhouse; C) determine the aggressiveness of these species n phomopsis in greenhouse; D) compare the U.S. Phomopsis specie(s) in the United States to those in other important sunflower growing areas in the world (winter nursery and production areas); and #0 educate a PhD level sunflower pathologist

Evaluation of 9, 10 anthraquione bird repellent for managing blackbird damage to ripening sunflower
Researcher: George Linz A
mount requested:  $17,720

After breeding, blackbirds aggregate in large flocks that feed on ripening crops, especially sunflower.  Although subject to market prices, direct economic losses to sunflower are currently estimated to exceed $10 million per annum. Additional expenses are incurred by growers trying to protect their crop from blackbirds. Effective methods are limited to managing roost vegetation with glyphosate, harassment of birds with propane cannons and firearms, and planting less valuable crops near wetland roosts. Some growers located in traditional sunflower growing areas have abandoned the crop because of losses due to blackbird feeding.  Before the sunflower industry can reclaim some of these acres, an effective bird repellent will need to be developed and integrated into an overall pest management system that might include roost management, harassment, and wildlife decoy crops.  Currently, two bird repellents are registered for use on ripening sunflower.  However, growers report inconsistent results with both repellents.  Thus, an effective bird repellent is still needed to protect ripening sunflower.

Scientists have successfully developed 9, 10 anthraquinone (AQ) for repelling birds from eating planted corn, rice and sunflower seeds.  The patent holder has recently applied for a full national registration to use AQ repellent on corn seeds.  AQ has been tested on ripening rice and found to effectively disperse blackbirds.  Although the formulated product is not registered for use on food products, it is registered for use on turf to discourage geese.

The researchers propose to expand the testing of AQ for use on ripening sunflower.  If effective and an acceptable residue food tolerance can be established, this product could represent a major break-through in blackbird management.

Funding decision

It was moved by Ridl and seconded by Clemens to grant negotiated funding of up to $11,568 for the project titled “Development of management strategies to control sunflower rust using genetic resistance and fungicides.”  The motion carried.

There being no further business, the committee meeting was adjourned.

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