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February 15, 2013 Conference Call Meeting Minutes

State Board of Agricultural Research and Education Corn Granting Committee
February 15, 2013 Conference Call Meeting Minutes

The conference call was called to order at 8:00 a.m. CST.  Voting members present were Kevin Skunes, Larry Hoffmann and Jeff Enger.  Non-voting members present John Bollingberg, Dr. Joel Ransom and Greg LaPlante.  Also present was Lori Capouch.

Kevin Skunes chaired the meeting.

The following proposals were before the committee for consideration:

Nitrogen recalibration for corn in North Dakota
Researcher: Dave Franzen
Amount requested:  $5,090

The research in year one will represent enough N-rate studies on corn so that over the past 4 years about 100 site-years of data from across the state will be collected. Nitrogen recommendations for corn will be revised using this modern data set. In addition, algorithms will be developed to enable corn growers to utilize active-optical light sensors on a nitrogen fertilizer applicator to determine whether their corn requires in-season N applications and at what rate.

Corn DDGS-A novel functional material for wood composites
Researcher: Dilpreet S. Bajwa
Amount requested: $4,000

This project aims at using corn-DDGs in the development of wood fiber composites (particle boards). The chemical composition of DDGs will be exploited to function as a natural lubricant, release agent and a binder in wood composites. These properties will help to minimize or eliminate use of petroleum based wax in the wood composites without compromising physical and mechanical properties of the composite boards.

Fungicide application strategies for corn yield enhancement in North Dakota
Researcher:  Mike Ostlie
Amount requested: $7,967

This study involves the collaboration of three NDSU departments in the investigation on the effects of corn fungicides and fungicide application timing for improving corn yields in the absence of disease pressure. The goal will be achieved by identify8ing optimum fungicide product and application timing combinations for different corn hybrid maturities while also identifying suboptimal combinations.

Corn stover removal effects on soil properties in North Dakota
Researcher:  Larry Cihacek
Amount requested: $2,625

This research will evaluate the impacts of variable stover removal rates on SOM as well as related physical properties such as resistance to penetration (hardening), soil aggregate stability and water infiltration.

Applied corn breeding for a sustainable North Dakota corn production
Researcher:  Marcelo Carena
Amount requested: $27,984

Corn has become the third top commodity crop in North Dakota and the NDSU corn program is the only state applied corn research program in the region that serves as a source of knowledge for unique new corn products.  This program will use science to develop unique short-season stable corn products with end practical use. The corn breeding program is known for being the most northern and largest public research program in North America moving corn north to cooler areas and west to drier regions at a very efficient rate. Minnesota’s Corn Research and Promotion Council has joined forces with the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council to support the North Dakota corn breeding efforts for developing short-season drought and cold tolerant unique products not currently available.

Optimization of nutrients and water use in corn and sorghum for silage using intercropping
Researcher: Marisol Berti
Amount requested: $10,235

This proposal has a main goal to introduce and evaluate the benefits of intercropping legumes and forage sorghum in corn silage production in North Dakota. Corn silage is the preferred feed choice by dairy and beef producers in the state. Unfortunately, corn requires high amounts of water and nutrients available for a high yield and quality which are costly. Using intercropping with legumes aims to reduce the nitrogen requirement of the corn silage thus reducing the cost of the feed. The intercropping with forage sorghum aims to reduce the water availability while maintaining yield and quality. In drought years, sorghum will perform better than corn and vice versa in wet years, reducing the variations in feed production due to climate unknowns. This research will generate valuable information mainly for corn silage producers. The intercropping with legumes will also be of great value for corn grain production in the state.

Funding decisions

It was moved by Enger and seconded by Hoffmann to grant negotiated funding as follows:

  1. $5,090 to the project titled “Nitrogen recalibration for corn in North Dakota.”
  2. $4,000 to the project titled “Corn DDGS-A novel functional material for wood composites.”
  3. $7,967 to the project titled “Fungicide application strategies for corn yield enhancement in North Dakota.”
  4. $2,625 to the project titled “Corn stover removal effects on soil properties in North Dakota.”
  5. $9,814 to the project titled “Applied corn breeding for a sustainable North Dakota corn production.”

The motion carried.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

 

February 4, 2011 Conference Call Meeting Minutes

State Board of Agricultural Research and Education
Corn Granting Committee
Conference Call Minutes

The conference call was called to order at 8 a.m. CST.  Voting members present were Kevin Skunes, Jeff Enger, Larry Hoffmann and Wallie Hardie.  Non-voting members present were Dr. Ken Grafton and Dr. Joel Ransom.  Also present was Cindy McDonald and Lori Capouch.

Kevin Skunes was appointed as chair of the committee by consensus.

The following proposals were considered:

Applied corn breeding in North Dakota: NDSU unique program to develop corn products for North Dakota environments
Researcher: Marcelo Carena
Amount requested:  $26,635

North Dakota is one of the U.S. states leading the expansion of corn acres nationally. Therefore, the continuity of a strong short-season breeding research program is essential for expanded acres in North Dakota.  However, still many US northern commercial hybrids are not locally bred as they are provided by retailer companies without local breeding programs.  Besides, early maturing industry testers are scarce. Therefore, these hybrids are often late-maturing products with below average yield, grain quality, drought tolerance, and rat of dry down reducing their utilization (e.g. ethanol). In addition, most of these hybrids track back to the same industry lines increasing their genetic vulnerability to pests and significantly reducing their available genetic diversity. In fact, the earliest maturing commercial product available is a 79 relative maturity product that normally behaves as 85 relative maturity. NDSU leads the largest and most northern corn-breeding program in North America moving corn north to cooler seasons and west to dry areas.

The project targets to:
1. increase the genetic diversity of North Dakota short-season corn hybrids.
2. identify the best possible reliable product for North Dakota industry and farmers.

This product expands the connection between US northern public research in corn breeding and product development and commercialization and utilization of NDSU corn products. NDSU has demonstrated extensive research and development of elite drought tolerance, high starch, and early maturing corn hybrids at no expense to grain yield potential for both ethanol producer areas where the seed industry is not actively present as well as desirable areas of corn production. The project will also enhance the value of North Dakota short-season hybrids by developing products not available in the US northern market, working toward healthier and safer products, and by capacity building through the training of the next generation of applied corn breeders.

Equipment for sample processing at NDSU beef cattle research complex and development of in vitro approaches to examine feed starch quality in corn
Researcher:  Kendall Swanson
Amount requested: $6,016.50

For this project, a centrifuge will be acquired for sample preparation at th newly constructed NDSU beef cattle research complex. The acquisition of a centrifuge to be housed at the beef cattle research complex will allow for more efficient sample preparation of biological samples collected for various research trials. Overall, the research at the facility will aim to improve the efficiency of beef cattle production through the use of alternative and improved feedstuffs, through an improved understanding of physiological factors affecting feed efficiency, and through improving reproductive performance of cattle. Additionally, in vitro digestive systems will be developed to assess hybrids for starch digestive quality in ruminant and non-ruminant production systems and for human food.

Funding decisions

It was moved by Enger and seconded by Hoffmann to grant negotiated funding of up to $26,635 to the project titled “Applied corn breeding in North Dakota: NDSU unique program to develop corn products for North Dakota environments.”  The motion carried.

It was moved by Hoffmann and seconded by Hardie to grant negotiated funding of up to $6,356 to the project titled “Equipment for sample processing at NDSU beef cattle research complex and development of in vitro approaches to examine feed starch quality in corn.”  The motion carried.

It was moved by Enger and seconded by Hardie to adjourn the meeting.  The motion carried.

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