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December 12, 2013 Meeting Minutes

State Board of Agricultural Research and Education
Animal Agriculture Granting Committee
Burleigh
County Extension Office

The meeting was called to order at 10 a.m.  Voting members present were Clark Price, Warren Zenker, Andrew Holle, Nathan Robbins, and Daryl Dukart.  Non-voting members present was Dr. Greg Lardy.  Also present was Lori Capouch.

The following presentations were made during the meeting.  (Summaries of the proposals can be found in the 11-14-13 minutes.)

  1. Rapid serological test for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus – Sheela Ramamoorthy
  2. Impact of nutrition on ovarian function in sheep – Anna T. Grazul-Bilska
  3. Influence of DDGs w/soluble on ram lamb growth & reproductive traits – Christopher Schauer and R. R. Redden
  4. Impact of beef cow mgmt immediately prior to breeding on pregnancy rate, nutritional status of cows and calves & calf weaning weight – Carl R. Dahlen and Bryan W. Neville
  5. The effects of growth promotant technologies on tenderness variation within a beef retail cut – Kasey Maddock Carlin
  6. Effects of vitamin E supplementation on vitamin E concentration, oxidative stress, and total antioxidant capacity in new weaned beef calves – Krista Wellnitz and Bryan Neville
  7. The role of vitamin A & E deficiency in perinatal calf mortality in ND cattle herds: cost match study with NDSU-VLD – Brett Webb
  8. Phenotypic and Genotypic Epidemiology of Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (Pink eye) due to Moraxella bovis and M. bovoculi across North Dakota – Penelope S. Gibbs

Funding decisions

The committee members discussed each project as a whole and then individually ranked the projects 1-3-5 with “1” representing the highest ranked proposals.  The individual rankings were used to determine the overall ranking of each project.  The non-voting members did not participate in the ranking process. 

It was moved to grant negotiated funding of up to ~94 percent of the grant request to the following projects.  Amount funded indicated in ( ):

  1. Rapid serological test for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus – Sheela Ramamoorthy ($6,300)
  2. Impact of nutrition on ovarian function in sheep – Anna T. Grazul-Bilska ($3,574)
  3. The effects of growth promotant technologies on tenderness variation within a beef retail cut – Kasey Maddock Carlin ($3,292)
  4. Phenotypic and Genotypic Epidemiology of Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (Pink eye) due to Moraxella bovis and M. bovoculi across North Dakota – Penelope S. Gibbs ($10,333)
  5. The role of vitamin A & E deficiency in perinatal calf mortality in ND cattle herds: cost match study with NDSU-VLD – Brett Webb ($6,065)
  6. Influence of DDGs w/soluble on ram lamb growth & reproductive traits – Christopher Schauer and R. R. Redden ($9,174)

The motion carried unanimously.

Funding was denied for the following projects:

  1. Impact of beef cow mgmt immediately prior to breeding on pregnancy rate, nutritional status of cows and calves & calf weaning weight – Carl R. Dahlen and Bryan W. Neville
  2. Effects of vitamin E supplementation on vitamin E concentration, oxidative stress, and total antioxidant capacity in new weaned beef calves – Krista Wellnitz and Bryan Neville

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

November 14, 2013 Conference Call Meeting Minutes

State Board of Agricultural Research and Education
Animal Agriculture Granting Committee

The meeting was called to order at 9 a.m.  Voting members present were Lyle Warner, Clark Price, Daryl Dukart, Warren Zenker, and Allan Tellmann. Non-voting member present was Dr. Greg Lardy.  Also present was Lori Capouch.

The committee appointed Lori Capouch to chair the meeting by consensus.

The committee briefly discussed the procedure to use for prescreening the applications.  It was the committee’s consensus to discuss each project and then make a determination as to which proposals ranked highest following the discussion.

The following projects were reviewed:

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Livestock Manure to Reduce Odor and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions from Manure Management
Researcher: Shafiqur Rahman
Amount requested:  $8,766

The main goal of the study is to minimize odor and GHG emissions from animal feeding operations through conversion of manure and other agricultural wastes to biogas using anaerobic digestion technology.

Maternal and postnatal endocrine and metabolic profiles in sheep based on maternal nutritional plane and rumen-protected arginine supplementation during gestation
Researchers:  Jena Peine; Joel Caton
Amount requested: $10,349

Laboratory analyses for serum hormones and metabolites related to growth, development, and performance.  A small amount of funds are requested for travel to present findings at local, regional, or national meetings.

The role of vitamin A and E deficiency in perinatal calf mortality in North Dakota cattle herds:  Cost match study with NDSU-VLD
Researcher: Brett Webb
Amount Requested: $6,450

Loss of calves from abortion, stillbirth and death within the first 24 hours of life are a major source of economic loss to North Dakota cow-calf producers.  Unfortunately the cause of death can only be determined in approximately 40% of cases.  Diagnostic investigation in cases of perinatal mortality is currently concentrated on testing for infectious agents, which comprise only one category of potential causes.  Nutritional aspects, particularly vitamin deficiencies, have been long associated with perinatal mortality but have received considerably less attention.  The goal of this project is to determine whether vitamin deficiencies are a significant cause of perinatal calf mortality in North Dakota herds and if so, provide immediately useful information back to producers and veterinarians so that supplementation programs can be initiated to curtail further losses.

Influence of dried distillers grains with solubles on ram lamb growth and reproductive traits
Researchers: Christopher Schauer and Reid Redden
Amount requested: $9,757

Ram lambs will be placed in the feedlot and fed one of four rations containing increasing levels of dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS).  The effects of DDGS on ram lamb feedlot performance will be monitored throughout the study.  Throughout the feeding phase, both semen and blood samples will be collected from a subsample of ram lambs to evaluate the effects of DDGS on semen quality and testosterone. 

Effects of vitamin E supplementation on vitamin E concentration, oxidative stress, and total antioxidant capacity in newly weaned beef calves
Researchers: Krista Wellnitz and Bryan Neville
Amount requested: $5,884

The purpose of this project is to determine the effect of injectable vitamin E on animal health, immune response, and growth performance.

The effects of variation in feed intake on feed efficiency in growing and finishing cattle
Researcher: Kendall Swanson
Amount requested: $18,242

The variation in feed intake from day to day and within each week may impact cattle growth and efficiency.  This project will examine previously collected data to examine relationships between variation in feed intake and cattle growth efficiency.  This project also will examine how experimentally changing feed intake patterns influence cattle growth and efficiency.  Results could lead to improved approaches for feeding and managing cattle to improve feed efficiency. 

Maternal Nutrition and Selenium Supplementation:  Effects on Epigenetic Precursors in Both Dams and Offspring
Researchers: Joel S. Caton and Marsha Kapphahn
Amount requested: $10,160

The objective of this project is to determine if epigenetic precursors are altered in sheep that have previously demonstrated developmental changes to maternal nutrient restriction and supplemental dietary selenium.

Impact of nutrition on ovarian function in sheep
Researcher: Anna T. Grazul-Bilska
Amount requested: $3,800

A critical aspect of reducing the high input costs of livestock production is to improve reproductive efficiency since reproductive failure remains one of the most costly factors in livestock production.  One of the major regulators of the reproductive function is nutrition.  Modern technologies are being developed for the enhancement of reproductive efficiency and the improvement and preservation of livestock genetics.  For example, modern methods in assisted reproductive technologies (ART) will enable the efficient transfer of embryos, single genes or entire genomes from desirable individuals or embryos, for screening of embryos for genetic defects, and for long-term storage.  However, successful application of these technologies depends on the health of donor animals, which is highly affected by diet.  This proposal addresses the growing need to determine the effects of nutrition on ovarian function which is a source of oocyte (egg), and to optimize animal diet in order to obtain healthy offspring.

The effects of growth promotant technologies on tenderness variation within a beef retail cut
Researchers: Kasey Maddock Carlin
Amount requested: $3,500

This project will evaluate the variation of the activity of the calpain system, which drives the increase in meat tenderness during aging, within a single beef strip steak.  Steaks will be obtained from cattle that either were not provided any growth promotant technologies, or provided a growth implant prior to finishing, or provided a growth implant prior to finishing and fed on beta-agonist for the last 20 days prior to slaughter.  Results from this study will provide information on the variation of tenderness within a single beef steak and determine if growth promoting technologies contribute more variation of tenderness.

Impact of beef cow management immediately prior to breeding on pregnancy rate, nutritional status of cows and calves, and calf weening weight
Researchers: Carl Dahlen and Bryan Neville
Amount requested: $7,950

Great variation in pregnancy rates exist among locations after implementing identical estrous synchronization and artificial insemination protocols in beef herds.  The current project explores different cattle management strategies around the time of breeding that will begin to explain some of the variability observed in pregnancy rates.  One group of cows and calves will remain on summer pastures over the course of a 10 day breeding period and another group of cows and calves will move from summer pastures to be managed in a wintering area and fed hay during the breeding period.  Pregnancy rates of cows along with weight change and indicators of nutritional status of cows and calves will be evaluated.  Results from this project will provide science-based recommendations about a strategy that eases the burden on time and labor resources for producers implementing artificial insemination.

Weight shifting as a measure of discomfort in dairy cows at drying-off
Researcher: Sarah Wagner
Amount requested: $3,920

Each year, dairy cows take a 2-month rest called the dry period, during which they are not milked.  Abruptly stopping milking at the beginning of the dry period may cause discomfort in dairy cows due to engorgement of the udder.  This project will validate a simple and specific method for determining how a cow’s udder feels when milking is stopped by recording how the cow bears weight on her rear limbs.  This method can be used to evaluate different approaches to discontinuation of milking, such as tapering off, to determine which approach will keep cows most comfortable.  

Does arginine supplementation to the neonatal dairy calf enhance growth?
Researcher: Kimberly Vonnahme
Amount requested: $15,540

Early growth trajectory appears to predict life-long production capabilities. We are going to test if growth in dairy bull calves can be enhanced by adding arginine to their milk replacer. 

The role of Endogenous Retroviruses and Conception Method in Syncytium Formation during Early Gestation
Researchers: Kyle McLean, Joel Caton, Larry Reynolds
Amount requested:  $7,710

The overall hypothesis for this project is that retroviruses have a role in the formation of syncytial plaques and plaque formation is altered by differing methods of conception.  To test this hypothesis, there are three specific objectives.  The first is to determine when expression of enJSRV-18 occurs during gestation in fetal and maternal tissues.  The next is to histologically determine if retroviruses influence the formation of syncytial plaques.  The final objective is to determine if the method of conception influences expression of syncytin and enJSRV-18 and thereby influences the size of syncytial plaques within the placentome.

Steroids in regulation of parturition, fetal maturation, and placental expulsion
Researcher: Larry Reynolds
Amount requested: $10,000

Delivering healthy offspring involves cortisol production by the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), promoting fetal organ maturation and simultaneous metabolism of progesterone by the placenta, leading to progesterone withdrawal, which is critical for initiating delivery of the fetus and placental.  Our novel Hypothesis is that parturition and neonatal survival are facilitated by a reduction in 5alpha-reductase activity in the fetal hypothalamus coincident with an increase in 5alpha-reduction in the placenta.  In this proposal, we will directly test a Key Component of our Hypothesis, namely that inhibition of a 5a-reductase will delay parturition by decreasing progesterone metabolism, thereby delaying progesterone withdrawal.

Regulation of Angiogenesis and Blood Vessel Function in the Reproductive System of Sheep
Researchers:  Dale Redmer and Jodie Haring
Amount Requested:  $3,431

Based on conflicting data from numerous sources, a series of well controlled studies need to be undertaken to clarify the effects of nutrition and arginine treatment on reproductive performance including endocrine systems, ovarian and uterine function, oocyte quality, which can be measured by expression of potential oocyte biomarkers, increased success in assisted reproduction techniques such as IVF, embryonic development, pregnancy rates, offspring outcome, and other measurements.

Rapid serological test of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus
Researcher:  Sheela Ramamoorthy
Amount Requested:  $6,700

The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), emerged as a new swine pathogen in the U.S. in May 2013.  PEDV causes acute diarrhea and vomiting in up to 100% of the exposed herd with mortality rates as high as 50% in young piglets.  There are currently no available PEDV vaccines.  Laboratory detection and diagnosis of PEDV is limited to histopathology in dead pigs and PCR on fecal matter.  However, PCRs can only detect PEDV in acutely infected animals.  The American Association of Swine Veterinarian’s guidelines recommend a combination of PCR and serology for viral detection and diagnosis because only serological tests can detect past or subclinical exposure to the virus.  The only serological test that is now available is an immunoflourescence assay which requires culture of the virus, is of variable sensitivity and is laborious to perform.  There are no tests available to measure protective antibody responses in exposed pigs or pigs subjected to feedback exposure.  The goal of this project is to develop a rapid, cost-effective serological assay to detect PEDV using computational methodology.  The need for virus culture will be circumvented by direct chemical synthesis of diagnostic targets.  While no PEDV cases have been recorded in N. Dakota so far all of the surrounding states are endemic for PEDV.  Therefore, the proposed test will have particular value in N. Dakota to screen negative replacement or breeding stock prior to sale or transportation.

Decisions

The committee discussed each project as a whole and through consensus determined which projects to invite to make a presentation during their committee meeting. 

It was moved and seconded to deny funding to the following projects

  1. Does arginine supplementation to the neonatal dairy calf enhance growth
  2. Weight shifting as a measure of discomfort in dairy cows at drying-off
  3. Regulation of angiogenesis & blood vessel function in the reproductive system of sheep
  4. Maternal mutrition & selenium supplementation: effects on epigenetic precursors in both dams and offspring
  5. Maternal & postnatal endocrine & metabolic profiles in sheep based on maternal nutritional plane & rumen protected arginine supplementation during gestation
  6. The effects of variation in feed intake on feed efficiency in growing and finishing cattle
  7. The role of endogenous retroviruses & conception method in syncytium formation during early gestation
  8. Steroids in regulation of parturition, fetal maturation & placental expulsion
  9. Anaerobic co-digestion of livestock manure to reduce odor & GHG emissions from manure management

The motion carried unanimously.

The remaining projects are to be invited to the Dec. 12, 2013 committee meeting to present their proposals.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

 

February 8, 2011 Meeting Minutes

State Board of Agricultural Research and Education
Animal Agriculture Granting Committee
Burleigh County Extension Office

The meeting was called to order at 10 a.m.  Voting members present were Lyle Warner, Allen Tellmann, Steve Metzger, Daryl Dukart and Bruce Haakenson.  Non-voting members present were Dr. Greg Lardy and Dr. David Buchanan.  Also present was Lori Capouch.

It was the consensus of the committee to appoint Dukart to chair the meeting.

The following presentations were made during the meeting.  (Summaries of the proposals can be found in the 12-13-10 minutes.)

  1. Evaluation of low-input growing and finishing options for cattle producers – Dr. Vern Anderson
  2. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and greenhouse gases emissions from North Dakota feedlots – Dr. Shafiqur Rahman
  3. Estradiol-17β replacement therapy to counteract nutritionally induced intrauterine growth restriction: impacts on placental and fetal growth and development outcomes – Ms. Roza Yunusova
  4. Countering nutritionally induced intrauterine growth restriction with VEGF gene therapy: impacts on fetal developmental outcomes – Dr. Joel Caton
  5. Surveillance of listeria monocytogenes and salmonella in ready to eat meats from processing plants and retail outlets in North Dakota – Dr. Margaret Khaitsa
  6. Use of young female gilts as a biomedical model of human females to determine if consumption of beef from cattle administered estrogenic growth promotants results in premature puberty – Dr. Eric Berg
  7. Why do temperamental cattle have tougher meat? – Dr. Kasey Maddock-Carlin
  8. Factors influencing feed intake and efficiency in backgrounding calves fed medium-quality hay with or without increasing levels of supplementation – Dr. Kendall Swanson
  9. Effects of rumen-protected arginine on intestinal amino acid appearance, site and extent of digestion, microbial efficiency and ruminal fermentation in steers fed a forage diet – Ms. Allison Meyer
  10. Current concepts in ewe estrus synchronization – Dr. Reid Redden

Funding decisions

The committee members discussed each project as a whole and then individually ranked the projects 1-3-5 with “1” representing the highest ranked proposals.  The individual rankings were used to determine the overall ranking of each project.  The non-voting members did not participate in the ranking process.

It was moved by Tellmann and seconded by Warner to grant negotiated funding as follows:

  1. $6,912 to the project titled “Evaluation of low-input growing and finishing options for cattle producers”.
  2. $9,500 to the project titled “Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and greenhouse gases emissions from North Dakota feedlots”.
  3. $5,036 to the project titled “Estradiol-17β replacement therapy to counteract nutritionally induced intrauterine growth restriction: impacts on placental and fetal growth and development outcomes”.
  4. $8,916 to the project titled “Use of young female gilts as a biomedical model of human females to determine if consumption of beef from cattle administered estrogenic growth promotants results in premature puberty”.
  5. $7,425 to the project titled “Why do temperamental cattle have tougher meat?”
  6. $11,100 to the project titled “Factors influencing feed intake and efficiency in backgrounding calves fed medium-quality hay with or without increasing levels of supplementation”.
  7. $6,198 to the project titled “Current concepts in ewe estrus synchoronization”.

The motion carried unanimously.

The committee held a discussion on whether they should recommend limiting the amount requested per project based on the declining funds available.  It was the committee’s consensus they were comfortable with the process as it currently stands.

It was moved by Metzger and seconded by Haakenson to adjourn the meeting.  The motion carried.

 

December 13, 2010 Conference Call Meeting Minutes

State Board of Agricultural Research and Education
Animal Agriculture Granting Committee

The meeting was called to order at 2 p.m.  Voting members present were Mark Huseth, Lyle Warner, Allan Tellmann, Steve Metzger, and Daryl Dukart. Non-voting members present were Dr. Greg Lardy and Dr. David Buchanan.  Also present was Lori Capouch

The committee appointed Allan Tellmann to chair the meeting by consensus.

The committee briefly discussed the procedure to use for prescreening the applications.  It was the committee’s consensus to discuss each project and then make a determination as to which proposals ranked highest following the discussion.

The following projects were reviewed:

Evaluation of low-input growing and finishing options for cattle producers
Researcher: Vern Anderson
Amount requested:  $7,412

North Dakota cattlemen can capture more value from the exceptional genetics for growth and carcass merit in their calves.  New markets are developing in the state for finished beef and demand is good for locally produced meat. However, cow/calf producers with minimum facilities or smaller herds cannot easily or economically feed their calves after weaning.  Self-feeding minimizes equipment, labor and facilities costs and can be very safe with higher levels of co-products.  There is no comparative data available for self-feeding with modern cattle, feed products and nutritional knowledge.  This study proposes to compare performance and economics of feeder cattle with exceptional genetic potential fed in self-feeders or fed totally mixed rations delivered to fence line bunks daily.

Screening and evaluation of legume species and their varieties for grazing, forage production, cover crops and soil health
Researcher:  Guojie Wang
Amount requested: $11,100

The livestock producers need more information about legume forage species for grazing, haying, conserving soil, and cover crops.  This project will provide information based on 42 legume species/varieties morphology, phenology, and their production and nutrition values. It will also provide date on their ability to fix N to the soil, to improve soil structure and function.

Grazing annual forages to extend the grazing season: Impacts on animal performance, forage production, forage intake, nutrient digestibility, soil health and economics
Researcher: Bryan Neville
Amount Requested: $19,434

This project will evaluate the effectiveness of both monoculture and multi-species mixes of annual forages as winter cover crops.  This research focuses on determining forage production, forage intake, nutrient digestibility, soil health, and economic benefits of grazing winter cover crops.

Comparing liquid water with snow as a water source for wintering beef cattle
Researcher: Bryan Neville
Amount requested: $8,901

This project will compare liquid water with snow as the water source for beef cattle during the winter months. Two experiments will be conducted. In the first, 30 replacement beef heifers will be divided into three groups to evaluate strategies to transition cattle from liquid water to snow consumption. Data collected during this time will allow researchers to quantify changes in weight during this period and stress response to the different transition types.

The second experiment will use 80 pregnant dry beef cows divided into pastures that either have access to liquid water, or rely solely on snow as a water source over a period of 60 days prior to calving. Data collected will allow researchers to determine effects of reliance on snow for water on measures of hydration status, body weight, body condition, and carcass composition changes (back fat, ribeye area) as well as calf birth weight, calving ease, calf vigor, and calf health.

Effects of two-stage and abrupt weaning on calf and cow welfare and blood metabolites, calf growth performance and marbling deposition of spring-born Angus-cross calves
Researchers: Michele Thompson and Carl Dahlen
Amount requested: $13,144

The goal of this study is to determine how two-phase weaning, a low-stress weaning method, reduces the negative effects of traditional weaning on calves and cows. Researchers will examine how two-phase weaning compares to traditional weaning on calf and cow welfare and plasma stress measures, as well as the calves’ immune responses from weaning through a 65-da6 growing period.  Furthermore, we want to determine the impacts on growth and performances responses and marbling ability of two-phase weaned calves during the background period. The research results generated from this project will assist North Dakota cow-calf producers in deciding if two-phase weaning is a better and less stressful weaning alterna5tive to traditional weaning for their calves.

Influence of the level of dried distiller’s grains with solubles on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, and semen quality of growing rams
Researchers: Christopher Schauer and Megan Van Emon
Amount requested: $7,830

Ram lambs will be placed in the feedlot and fed one of three rations containing increasing levels of dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS). The effects of DDGS on ram lamb feedlot performance will be monitored throughout the study and at the conclusion lambs will be transported for harvest and the collection of carcass data.  Throughout the feedlot phase both semen and blood samples will be collected from a subsample of ram lambs to evaluate the effects of DDGS on semen quality and testosterone, respectively.

Modulation of processes that are regulated by E. coli O157:H7FlhC on meat
Researcher: Birgit Pruess
Amount requested: $10,000

The Escherichia coli isolate O157:H7 is a highly virulent pathogen and one of the predominant causes of E. coli associated food-borne disease in the United States. With this proposal, researchers wish to continue the development of a new antimicrobial spray that constitutes a nutrient or metabolic intermediate for the bacteria that they will find harder to become resistant against.  This nutrient or metabolite when sprayed on the surface of the beef will affect cellular processes, such as cell division or acid resistance. The new sprays could be used alone or in combination with one of the current acid sprays.

Ammonia, Hydrogen Sulfide and greenhouse gas emissions from North Dakota feedlots
Researcher: Shafiqur Rahman
Amount requested: $14,460

The objective of this study is to provide science-based on-farm ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and greenhouse gas emissions from feedlot operation under North Dakota livestock management practices and weather conditions.

Estradiol-17β replacement therapy to counteract nutritionally induced intrauterine growth restriction: impacts on placental and fetal growth and development outcomes
Researchers: Roza Yunusova, Joel Caton and Dale Redmer
Amount requested: 5,536

The primary focus of this project is to investigate the causes of intrauterine growth restriction which results in low birth weight offspring. Low birth weight offspring have greater mortality and morbidity and are at risk for increased postnatal health issues. The proposed work will address potential treatments to offset intrauterine growth restriction, investigate potential biological mechanisms and generate preliminary data for preparation of future grant submissions to federal funding agencies.

Countering nutritionally induced intrauterine growth restriction with BEGF gene therapy: impacts on fetal developmental outcomes
Researcher: Joel Caton
Amount requested: $6,380

This study will investigate a novel approach to improving fetal and postnatal developmental outcomes in ruminant livestock experiencing inappropriate maternal nutrition. Emphasis will be place upon intestinal growth and function and neonatal mortality and morbidity.

Surveillance of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella in ready to eat meats from processing plants and retail outlets in North Dakota
Researcher: Margaret Khaitsa
Amount requested: $13,350

This project will develop capacity at NDSU for detecting Listeria monocytogenes and salmonella in ready to eat meats from processing plants and retail outlets in North Dakota.  The information obtained will help researchers evaluate the level of risk of these two pathogens in ready to eat meats in North Dakota.

Use of young female gilts as a biomedical model of human females to determine if consumption of beef from cattle administered estrogenic growth promotants results in premature puberty
Researcher: Eric Berg
Amount requested:  $9,416

The researchers propose the use of pre-pubertal gilts as an animal biomedical model for young human females in order to assess pre-pubertal diet on attainment of puberty and growth. The hypothesis is that beef obtained from cattle receiving an aggressive estrogenic implant strategy during feedlot finishing does not alter the timing of puberty, or the body composition post-puberty compared to females fed non-implanted “natural” beef, or a common meat alternative, tofu.

Improved diagnosis and management of bovine abortion in North Dakota cattle herds
Researcher: Robert Barigye
Amount requested: $18,320

The primary goal of the proposed study is to improve the success rate of diagnostic investigations of bovine abortion so that veterinary diagnosticians at the NDSU Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and elsewhere may provide accurate bovine abortion test results to producers and field veterinarians. This will promote the adoption of appropriate interventions (treatment, vaccination programs, animal nutrition) so the prevalence of bovine abortion in the state may be reduced.

Why do temperamental cattle have tougher meat?
Researcher: Kasey Maddock-Carlin
Amount requested:  $7,925

It has been documented the beef cattle temperament is lined to beef tenderness. This project will determine if the muscle structural components such as connective tissue and muscle contractile length is different in excitable cattle when compared to calm cattle. Results from this study may indicate a need to handle excitable cattle differently to help prevent these structural changes, thus changing beef tenderness.

Effects of eliminating forage from diets on alternating days while supplementing cattle with dried distillers grains on intake, digestibility and blood endocrine profiles
Researchers: Carl Dahlen & Sharnae Klein
Amount requested: $12,112

This project will evaluate the effects of an alternative supplementation strategy on feed intake, digestibility, and blood hormone profiles. The strategy evaluated will eliminate forage from diets of cattle on alternating days when cattle are receiving dried distillers grains as a supplement. Thus on the first day of the week cattle would receive only hay, on the second day of the week cattle would receive only supplement (no hay), and this alternating pattern of feeding would continue over the duration of the study. This strategy has potential to save not only time and labor, buat also to reduce feed costs which is the major direct expense in most beef operations.

Factors influencing feed intake and efficiency in backgrounding calves fed medium-quality hay with or without increasing levels of supplementation
Researcher:  Kendall Swanson
Amount requested: $15,100

This project will examine the effect of supplementation with distillers grains on feed intake and performance in growing cattle fed grass hay.  It also will examine factors that contribute to differences in feed efficiency between animals with or without supplementation. This experiment should provide information on the impact of supplementation on performance and feeding behavior in growing cattle fed medium-quality forage. It should also increase understanding on the variability in feed utilization between animals and what is contributing to this variation. It could result in defining low-cost and easily-measured indicator traits to select cattle types for efficiently utilizing lower quality forages.

Effects of rumen-protected arginine on intestinal amino acid appearance, site and extent of digestion, microbial efficiency, and ruminal fermentation in steers fed a forage diet
Researcher: Allison Meyer & Joel Caton
Amount requested: $7,245.20

Project objectives:
1. To determine effects of feeding rumen-protected Arginine on appearance of Arginine and other amino acids in the intestine.
2. To investigate effects of supplemental Arginine on site and extent of nutrient digestion in steers fed a forage diet.
3. To investigate effects of supplemental Arginine on microbial efficiency, ammonia concentration, ruminal pH, and volatile fatty acid production in steers fed a forage diet.

Current concepts in ewe estrus synchronization
Researcher: Reid Redden
Amount requested:  $10,000

Two experiments will be conducted to test the effectiveness of the newly approved sheep controlled intravaginal drug releasing device in conjunction with a gonadotropin releasing hormone injection to synchronize ovulation. In experiment 1, treatments will induce sheep to breed in the spring and lamb in the fall, opposed to when sheep normally only cycle in the fall to lamb in the spring. In experiment 2, treatments will induce all the sheep to breed within two or three days to condense the lambing season. This research will provide information that sheep producers can use to improve out-of-season breeding, better time lambing, and propose new methods to synchronize ewe for reproductive technologies.

Effect of a single injection of curcumin on progesterone availability during early gestation
Researcher: Caleb O. Lemley
Amount requested: $9,534

This project will examine the effect of a single injection of curcumin, a common spice ingredient, on the rate of progesterone breakdown and progesterone concentrations during early pregnancy.  Due to the positive association between high progesterone and improve fertility, curcumin could be a potential candidate for increasing reproductive efficiency in several livestock species.

Economic value of certain horse traits in North Dakota
Researcher: Carrie Hammer
Amount requested: $2,000

The objective of this project is to examine different horse traits as a predictor of selling price at public auction.

Decisions

The committee discussed each project as a whole and through consensus determined which projects to invite to make a presentation during their committee meeting.

It was the consensus of the committee to deny funding to the following projects:

  1. Screening and evaluation of legume species and their varieties for grazing, forage production, cover crops and soil health
  2. Grazing annual forages to extend the grazing season; impacts on animal performance, forage production, forage intake, nutrient digestibility, soil health and economics
  3. Modulation of processes that are regulated by E. coli O157:H7 FlhC on meat
  4. Comparing liquid water with snow as a water source for wintering beef cattle
  5. Effects of two-stage and abrupt weaning on calf and cow welfare and blood metabolites, calf growth performance and marbling deposition of spring-born angus-cross calves
  6. Improved diagnosis and management of bovine abortion in North Dakota cattle herds
  7. Effects of eliminating forage from diets on alternating days while supplementing cattle with DDGs on intake, digestibility and blood endocrine profiles
  8. Influence of the level of DDGs with solubles on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, and semen quality of growing rams
  9. Effect of a single injection of curcumin on progesterone availability during early gestation
  10. Economic value of certain horse traits in North Dakota

The remaining projects are to be invited to the Feb. 8, 2011 committee meeting to present their proposals.

The motion carried.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

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