NDSU Extension Service - Sargent County

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Water for Crops, Lawns, and People

drinking waterWater for Crops, Lawns, and People

Earlier this month, the soil, crops and lawns were getting really thirsty, so the rains we received couple of weeks ago were very welcome!  The water was very refreshing for plants.  It was refreshing for the people, too!  The weather forecast being what it is for the week of July 18-25, my bet is that crops and lawns will need another drink real soon!

People, pets, and livestock need lots of water, too!  But we shouldn’t wait until we feel thirsty before we take a drink.  If we do, dehydration will already have gotten a head start on us!   Other early indicators of dehydration include urine output that is infrequent, odorous, or yellow like apple juice.

Water makes up over 60% of our total body weight, and is part of the cells that make up our body tissues and organs. For example the human brain is about 75% water. 

Water does amazing things inside our body, including:
     
-      Regulating body temperature
     
-      Carrying nutrients and oxygen to all body cells
     
-      Cushioning our joints as we move
     
-      Flushing toxins out of organs
     
-      Helping in the elimination of body wastes

Drinking water has also been associated with helping people lose weight, look younger, and prevent or decrease stress.

The amount of fluid needed each day will vary, depending on each person’s age, gender, weight, underlying health status and/or health conditions, activity level, and environmental conditions.  Our body needs more fluid in hot, humid, cold, or high altitude conditions.

Health professionals at Harvard School of Public Health have pointed out that about 80% of the fluid our body needs every day typically comes from beverages, and the other 20% comes from the foods we eat.  Believe it or not, a banana is about 74% water, while an apple is about 84% water, and broccoli is about 91% water.  That being said, just imagine what percentage of cantaloupe, juicy peaches, or watermelon is water!  The idea of drinking “eight glasses of water every day” is a step in the right direction to satisfy our body’s need for fluid. 

To accomplish the goal of being well-hydrated, try these strategies:

     -      Drink 5-10 ounces of water every 20 minutes, whether you feel thirsty or not.  Not being thirsty does not necessarily
            mean your body doesn’t need water.  Drinking water instead of energy drinks, sodas, and juices helps you stay
            hydrated without drinking in extra calories.

     -      If cold water doesn’t appeal to you, try drinking water at room temperature, or heated.

     
-      Make water more exciting by adding slices of lemon, lime, cucumber, or watermelon to your pitcher, glass, or bottle
            of water.

     -      Limit alcohol consumption because alcohol is dehydrating and a source of extra calories.

I hope to see you at the Sargent County Fair this weekend!  Let’s bring our water bottles with us!

References:  https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/eatsmart/eat-smart.-play-hard.-magazines-1/2012-esph-magazine/what-you-drink-matters-more-than-you-think, https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-drinks-full-story/,

http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/water/youth/drinking-water/the-water-we-drink,

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/rm-quiz-know-about-hydration?ecd=wnl_spr_063016&ctr=wnl-spr-063016_nsl-ld-stry_1&mb=SbJ%40KLAWKf2I%40NqWtzpt6OHnVev1imbCkl4WS6xL24g%3d

 

Photo Credit: https://pixabay.com/en/drinking-water-filter-singapore-1235578/  (Downloaded 7/31/16)

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