NDSU Extension Service - Sargent County

Accessibility


| Share

Enjoy Alcohol-free, Smoke-free, Drug-free Pregnancy



pregnancy-1253752_1280.jpgLife can be challenging, and school can be hard.  It is even more so for children and families living with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), fetal alcohol effects (FAE), and fetal drug effects.

No amount of any type of alcohol or other drugs is considered safe during pregnancy.  Yet, in 2013, North Dakota women, ages 18-44, had a 64% rate of alcohol use and a 25.8% rate of binge drinking.  FAS, FAE, and fetal drug effects can result if a woman consumes or uses any amount of any type of alcohol, cigarettes, or other drugs at any time during her pregnancy.  For that reason, these conditions are totally preventable. 

The effects of FAS, FAE, and fetal drug effects on a child can range from mild to severe. A child born without physical evidence of FAS may develop signs of FAE or fetal drug effects as he/she grows and develops.

A child with FAS, FAE, or fetal drug effects may have behavioral problems such as moodiness or impulsivity, stubbornness, or difficulty dealing with changes such as new teachers or new classmates.

A child with FAS, FAE, or fetal drug effects may have difficulty making and keeping friends, be inattentive or easily distracted, or have trouble solving their own problems.  He or she may not be able to play well alone, but get loud or overexcited and fight when playing with others.

Neurologicially, a child with FAS, FAE, or fetal drug effects may be clumsy, shaky, or uncoordinated in running, skipping and climbing, and unable to understand ideas and instructions.  His or her speech may be slow or difficult to understand.  He or she may have learning disabilities, poor memory, and trouble expressing their needs.

In 2002, CDC estimated $2 million to be the cost of FAS for one person, over the course of his/her lifetime.  The estimated cost to the United States for FAS is over $4 billion annually.

No amount of any type of alcohol or other drugs is considered safe during pregnancy. 

References: http://www.preventfas.com/, and    http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fasd/data.html.

Photo Source: https://pixabay.com/en/pregnancy-maternity-new-life-mother-1253752/ (Downloaded 11-15-16)

 

 

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.