Publications

Accessibility


Latest Publications

Here are the latest publications from NDSU Extension.

Emerald Ash Borer: Biology and Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota

This publication summarizes the threat of invasive metallic wood-boring beetle, emerald ash borer, to North Dakota's ash trees. It's identification, biology, damage, and pest management strategies including cultural, plant resistance, biological control and chemical control are discussed. If you suspect that your ash tree is infested with emerald ash borer, it also tells you what to do.

Read More…

IDENTIFICATION and CONTROL of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.)

Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.

Read More…

Know Your Knapweeds

North Dakota is being threatened by three noxious weeds that could infest more acreage in the state and at a faster rate than leafy spurge. Members of this trio include spotted, diffuse, and Russian knapweed. These three knapweeds already infest more acreage than leafy spurge in Montana and Minnesota, and have been found in over 20 counties in North Dakota. Knapweeds are related to thistles and can spread even faster.

Read More…

Molds in Your Home

Exposure to mold is common both inside and outside the home, but some people are more sensitive to mold than others, especially those with allergies and asthma. Mold exposure may cause cold-like symptoms, watery eyes, sore throat, wheezing and trigger asthma attacks.

Read More…

Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet

Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.

Read More…

Now You're Cookin'! Beans

If you’re looking for a way to stretch your budget and improve your family’s nutrition, look no further. Consider adding more beans to your menu. They’re convenient, versatile and lend themselves to many tasty dishes. Beans are a rich source of protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Replace some of the fat in baked goods such as brownies with mashed black beans. Beans can be added to casseroles or soups to add flavor, texture and more nutrients.

Read More…

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.