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Health and Fitness

Walk This Way - FN578
Regular physical activity helps protect against cardiovascular disease and its risk factors: hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus. It also can reduce risk of osteoporosis, reduce stress and improve sleep and overall mood. This publication shares tips on walking to get fit and stay healthy. It includes a sample walking program.
Stretching Toward Better Health - FN607
Stretching may be done at any time of the day and can involve a great number of exercises. This publication covers types of stretching and includes instruction on how to stretch different muscle groups.
Walking:Select The Right Shoes - FN603
Program walking is a great way to add some physical activity for improved health and well-being. Shoes worn during walking need to feel good on the feet and provide adequate support for both the feet and your skeletal structure. Evaluation of individual walking patterns will assist with selecting the right shoes and help make walking an enjoyable experience.
Activities to Promote Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits Among Children - FN692
These activities provide a way for teachers and volunteer educators to reinforce nutrition and fitness concepts for children in classrooms, after-school programs or club settings –and have fun, too! Most of the activities in this publication require little time, preparation or equipment. Most can be modifi ed to fi t the knowledge and skills of a variety of age groups.
Is Your Playground Safe for Kids - FN1374
We want our kids to “play hard,” but we want them to play safely, too. Parents and caregivers need to be aware of potential safety issues and what a properly maintained playground looks like. This publication provides information about surfacing materials and safety standards.
Sports Supplements: Play the Game Right - FN1399
An athlete usually needs to increase his/her energy intake compared with the energy used. Athletes also require more water, protein, vitamins and minerals (especially iron and calcium). Before you stock up on these expensive helpers, remember that just eating more nutritious food usually is cheaper and easier.
Sports Drinks: R They Needed? - FN1400
Sports drinks, such as Gatorade, Powerade and All Sport, contain carbohydrates and electrolytes, such as sodium, potassium and chloride. They are made for physical activity, to help rehydrate and to keep energy levels high. Are sports drinks really necessary? Not always. You can get these same benefits from other sources. A sports drink is not better for you unless you are active for 60 to 90 minutes or are exercising in very hot conditions. Anything less, and water should be the drink of choice.
Face the Facts About Sports Nutrition - FN1401
Increased physical activity increases some of your food needs. Your body requires more energy and water. Food that is eaten before and between events can affect your ability to perform at your best level.
Eat Smart: Enjoy Breakfast Every Day - FN1433
Eating breakfast fuels the body with needed nutrients, provides energy for an active day, gets you ready to learn and helps you keep a healthy body.
Eat Smart: Bone Up on Calcium - FN1434
Children ages 9 to 13 need 1,300 milligrams of calcium a day to keep their bones and teeth strong. Children ages 4 to 8 need 800 milligrams of calcium per day. They also need vitamin D, which helps the body use the calcium. Milk is fortifi ed with vitamin D. Many foods contain calcium. The best sources are milk, yogurt and cheese. Fish, soy products and nuts also are good sources of calcium. Some fruit juices, cereals, breads, snacks and other foods have added calcium.
Eat Smart. Play Hard. Do You Need an Energy Drink? - FN1435
People often substitute energy drinks for healthier beverage choices, so compare the Nutrition Facts labels. Energy drinks provide few if any of the needed vitamins and minerals provided by healthier beverage choices. Plain water is a better choice for most individuals.
Eat Smart. Play Hard. Get Your Iron! - FN1436
Your body needs iron to move oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Iron is an important part of hemoglobin, which is the part of your red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the rest of the body.
Play Hard! Get Your Physical Activity - FN1437
Physical activity helps build and maintain a strong body. Be active every day! Kids need 60 minutes of physical activity most days of the week. Adults need at least 30 minutes of physical activity to stay healthy.
Eat Smart. Choose Healthy Pre-and Post-game Meals - FN1438
Have a light meal so it can be digested easily. The pregame meal should include a variety of foods but focus on carbohydraterich food such as bread or pasta. Make sure to include grains, fruits and vegetables in the meal. Drink plenty of fluids.
Eat Smart. Choose Healthy Snacks - FN1439
Think of snacks as minimeals that help provide nutrients and energy you need to grow, play and learn. Most kids do best when they eat four to six smaller meals a day.
Eat Smart. Play Hard. Do You Need a Sports Drink? - FN1440
Sports drinks are recommended only to increase your physical performance if you are physically active for more than 60 to 90 minutes. Anything less, water should be the drink of choice because it’s better for hydration. Make sure to drink enough fluids before, during and after physical activity.
The Scoop on Snow Shoveling Safety - FN1518
The weather can make shoveling more difficult. Cold air makes working and breathing hard, which adds some extra strain on the body. Shovelers also are at risk for hypothermia, a decrease in body temperature, if they are not dressed correctly for the weather conditions.
Nourish Your Body With Sleep (FN1854)
This provides information about sleep needs, foods that may affect sleep and ways to promote sleep.
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