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Food and Nutrition

Food Safety Basics: A Reference Guide for Foodservice Operators - FN572
This manual for foodservice operators reviews basic aspects of food sanitation throughout a foodservice operation and provides reference materials on food storage and other aspects of food safety.
Cooking for Groups: A Volunteer's Guide to Food Safety - FN585
The goal of this publication is to help volunteers prepare and serve food safely for large groups such as family reunions, church dinners, and community gatherings — whether the food is prepared at the volunteer's home and brought to the event, or prepared and served at the gathering.
Got Calcium? - FN587
This publication highlights the importance of calcium in your diet. It includes daily calcium recommendations, the amount of calcium in common foods, and suggestions for increasing calcium in your diet.
Wild Side of the Menu No. 1 - Care and Cookery - FN124
The most succulent wild game can be destroyed by improper handling in the field or improper cooking at home. The handling of the meat from harvesting to preparing can make a major difference in flavor and safety of the end product. The purpose of this publication is to provide information on proper care and cookery of wild game so you can fully enjoy the fruits of the field.
Wild Side of the Menu No. 2 - Field to Freezer - FN125
Each year, hunting of animals and birds is increasingly popular, but often the game is wasted because of improper handling in the field. Nutritionally, game meats rate as well as domestic animals and may prove to be a healthier source of nutrition. Wild game that is properly treated in the field and correctly cooked to enhance its distinctive flavors holds a special place for many gourmets. The purpose of this publication is to describe how to properly handle your game from harvesting through processing.
Wild Side of the Menu No. 3 - Preservation of Game Meats and Fish - FN155
Wild game provides wholesome, nourishing food, but it should be handled and preserved carefully to retain quality. Like domestic meat, wild meat is perishable, so care is needed to maintain its safety. The purpose of this publication is to provide recommendations for safely preserving game meats and fish for later enjoyment. Freezing meat and fish is the most accepted way to maintain top quality. Other methods for preserving game meats include curing and smoking, drying, corning, canning and sausage making. Fish also may be pickled or canned.
Finding the Truth I: Reliable Nutrition and Health Information - FN569
It is impossible to keep up with each new study, fad, fraud, cure, exposé, warning or hope that is being promoted or reported by someone. We can, however, build ourselves a box of tools to help us analyze these claims. This publication will give you a head start in making a rational decision about the nutrition and health information you see.
Finding the Truth II: Are Popular Nutrition and Health Information Sources Reliable? - FN600
We’re all bombarded with information about nutrition and health. This publication will explore a few popular nutrition information sources and ways to determine if information is reliable.
Keep Food Safe in Temporary Food Stands - FN618
Safe food handling is important, especially when serving food to the public at temporary food stands. This publication includes information to help keep food prepared and offered for sale safe for the consumer.
Ingredient Substitutions - FN198
Have you ever been all set to prepare a food and suddenly discovered you were missing a certain ingredient? Sometimes it is inconvenient to go to the store to purchase the necessary ingredient. It may be more convenient to try a substitute from supplies available in your kitchen.
Cooking for One or Two - FN521
One- and two-person households are a growing sector in North Dakota and the United States. According to the 2000 census, North Dakota has almost 164,000 households with one or two members. The U.S. has more than 61 million one- and two-person households. They all have something in common: They need to eat! Sometimes, cooking for one or two may seem like it’s not worth the trouble; however, everyone needs a variety of foods to stay healthy. Homemade meals usually are more nutritious, better tasting and more economical, compared with restaurant meals. Use MyPlate to Help Guide Your Food Choices Nutrition and physical activity play a vital role in maintaining good health. The latest U.S. Department of Agriculture food icon, MyPlate, provides individualized plans to help guide your food choices. Visit the website at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov and enter your gender, age and physical activity level to print out a personalized plan. Use this guide to help plan your menus to meet your nutritional needs.
Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 4 Ways to Use Day-old Bread - FN1743
Using day-old bread can help you stretch your food dollars. Some bakeries offer day-old bread at discounted prices. You might buy a few loaves because you found a great deal; unfortunately, you might get tired of it before you use all of it. What can you do with it?
Meat Mixes - FN621
Homemade mixes can save time and money. You can make meat mixes ahead of time and freeze them for future use in spaghetti, casseroles and tacos. Adding ingredients such as onions and celery improves flavor and nutrition. To stretch your budget, shop for ingredients when they are on sale. Label with date of purchase.
Milk Master Mix and Magic White Sauce - FN622
Making your own mixes can save you money and time. Milk Master Mix combines nonfat dry milk with other common ingredients. You can use Milk Master Mix to make soups, puddings and Magic White Sauce. Use Magic White Sauce in a variety of main dishes and desserts. For example, try the white sauce in macaroni and cheese.
Now Serving: Shopping for Family Meals - FN693
Enjoying more family meals takes a little planning, but it’s worth the effort. Children who eat with their families do better in school, are less likely to take part in risky behavior (such as smoking and drinking alcohol) and are less likely to have symptoms of depression. Children who eat more family meals have an overall healthier diet, compared with children who eat fewer family meals. They eat more fruits, vegetables, grains and calcium-rich foods, and they drink fewer soft drinks. Enjoy more family meals by taking some time to plan your menus and your shopping trips. Involve your family in menu planning, shopping, preparation and cleanup. Children can learn valuable life skills, such as cooking and communication skills, when helping in the kitchen. They learn to appreciate a variety of foods as they help plan and shop for meals.
Now Serving: Breakfast - FN694
Enjoying more family meals adds up to better nutrition, stronger family bonds and children who are less likely to participate in risky behavior. Be flexible with meal schedules and locations of your family meals. If evenings are too hectic, would a regular family breakfast work for you?
Now Serving: More Whole Grains - FN695
Children who eat more often with their families eat a healthier diet, including more grains, fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods. Grain foods, such as pasta, bread and rice, provide energy, vitamins and minerals. USDA’s MyPlate recommends that we make at least half our grains whole. The recommendations for grain foods are in “ounce equivalents.” Enjoy 3 or more ounce equivalents of whole-grain foods every day.
Now Serving: More Whole Fruits and Vegetables - FN696
Family meals give parents/caregivers a chance to be good nutrition role models for children. Whether you’re sharing a meal at a park, in a car or at the family table, children who eat with their families eat a more nutritious diet. They eat more fruits and vegetables and other nutritious foods. Shared meals give families a chance to reconnect and talk about the events of their day. Children can learn communication skills, manners and their families’ values as they share food. Sharing meals also creates memories that will last a lifetime. Keep mealtime pleasant and allow enough time to eat because children eat better in a relaxed setting.
Now Serving: More Calcium Rich Foods - FN697
Children who eat with their families are more likely to meet their calcium needs and drink less soda pop. That’s good news because children are building strong bones and need calcium and other nutrients as the building blocks. Teens have the highest calcium needs due to their rapid growth. Children who meet their calcium and other nutrient needs are less likely to get the bone- thinning disease osteoporosis when they grow older. Adults should meet their calcium needs to keep their bones strong throughout life. About 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and another 18 million are at risk of getting it due to low bone mass. Even though osteoporosis often is associated with women, about 20 percent of those who suffer from it are male. Osteoporosis is responsible for 1.5 million fractures a year, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation.
Can We Talk About Folic Acid - FN704
What is It? OK, so you’ll think about taking folic acid, but what is it exactly? Folic acid is a human-made form of the B vitamin folate, and is necessary for making new, healthy cells in the body. Everyone Needs It Recent studies have shown that folic acid may reduce the risk of cardiac disease and certain types of cancers. Some studies suggest it also might help lower the risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease.
Now Serving: Meals with Help from Kids - FN705
An increasing number of children and teenagers are eating more meals and snacks away from their home and family. They may be choosing unhealthy ready-to-eat food options rather than spending time preparing a healthy snack or meal – and eating with their families. Encouraging children and teenagers to cook can build healthy lifestyle skills, creativity and healthy food choices. You also are helping them form good eating behaviors that will last a lifetime.
Now Serving: Meals with Help from Teens - FN706
More children and teenagers are eating meals and snacks away from their home and family. Encouraging teens to help prepare food and clean up can help busy families manage their time. Teens learn important cooking skills and have fun, too. Cooking promotes creativity and helps teens form good eating behaviors that will last a lifetime.
Now Serving: Well-Measured Recipes - FN707
Family meals promote family togetherness. Family meals provide a time to share what is going on in each other’s lives and enjoy a nutritious meal. Families who eat together are more likely to have more balanced meals. Preparing the meal is an important part of mealtime. Have children help in every aspect of the preparation, from choosing the menu to setting the table to making the meal. Including children in the preparation can lead to lifelong knowledge and memories.
Sauerkraut: From Garden to Table - FN433
Making sauerkraut is often part of introductory classes in microbiology. To avoid a "science experiment gone wrong" at home, follow the recommendations in this publication from garden to table.
Whole Grains: Agriculture to Health - FN691
Whole-grains contain all elements of the kernel-bran, germ and endosperm. The bran and germ contain a variety of health-enhancing components-dietary fiber, phytochemicals, vitamins, trace minerals and small amounts of unsaturated fat. This publication provides the recommended daily amounts, the health benefits and recipes of whole grains.
From Garden to Table: Harvesting Herbs for Healthy Eating - H1267
Herbs have been used for cooking, medicine, aromatherapy, religious ceremonies, pest control, and simply for decoration, since pre-Biblical times. The purpose of this publication is to serve as a guide in growing and using herbs for culinary purposes.
Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 1: Meal Planning Tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1383
Planning menus, buying food and fixing meals your family likes can be challenging tasks. Staying within your food budget can add to the challenge. This is the first in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes sample menus that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes.
Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 2: Grocery Shopping Tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1384
Menu planning can help you serve your family healthier meals and it can help you save money at the grocery store. After Planning your menus, the next step is developing a grocery list so you have all the necessary foods for each meal. This is the second in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes grocery shopping tips, sample menus and recipes that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes.
Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 3: Cost-saving Tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1385
You may have established a weekly menu and shopping list, but now you need the food. Going to the grocery store to buy food for your family may be something you do not look forward to doing. Decreasing the amount of time and money you spend there may help change that. This is the third in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store.
Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 4: Planned-over Food tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1386
Planning menus, shopping for foods and using your leftovers wisely can pay off in many ways. Your family can enjoy healthy meals with lots of variety, and you can stretch your budget. This is the fourth in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes sample menus and recipes that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes. It also includes creative ways to make use of your leftovers, which become "planned-overs".
Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 5: Time-saving Tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1387
In today's busy world, cooking a meal completely from scratch may be difficult. However, convenience foods usually cost more and may be higher in calories, fat and sodium. This is the fifth in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes time-money-saving tips and sample menus with recipes that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes.
Family Meals Times Family Meals Matter Issue 1 - FN1526
Making regular family meals a priority is important. Not every meal has to be a sit-down dinner extravaganza. This publication gives you ideas on how you can take back your time.
Family Meals Times Make Family Meals a Tradition Issue 2 - FN1527
A family tradition has been defined as an activity that is significant and meaningful for family members and is coordinated and repeated through time. Building family traditions that last and have personal meaning for family members helps build strong family relations.
Family Meals Times Eat Better - Eat Together Issue 3 - FN1528
Research has shown that when children eat with families, their overall nutrition and diets improve.
Family Meal Times Family Fun at the Dinner Table Issue 4 - FN1529
Playing games or doing activities at a family meal can create specific memories for family members.
Family Meal Times Improving Family Communication with Family Meals Issue 5 - FN1530
Family mealtimes provide a built-in opportunity to visit with other family members and enjoy good conversation.
Family Meal Times Learning to Eat Right at Family Meals Issue 6 - FN1531
Family meals help parents teach children healthy eating habits for a lifetime.
Family Meal Times: Feeding a Family on a Thrifty Budget Issue 8 - FN1533
You can provide your family with nutritious, tasty and simple meals, even when times are tough. The tips here may help you stretch your budget.
Family Meal Times Invite Kids Into the Kitchen Issue 9 - FN1534
Cooking can be a recipe for building relationships and learning important life skills.
Family Meal Times Issue 10: Make-ahead Meals Save Dinnertime Tonight - FN1535
Try something new this week. Start by planning five to seven meals that your family enjoys.
Family Meal Times Promote Healthy Habits for a Healthy Lifestyle Issue 11 - FN1536
Whether your child is overweight or not, healthful eating and exercise are keys to personal well-being. As a parent, you can take an active role and guide your child in the right direction to grow and pursue good health for a lifetime.
On the Pulse of Healthful Eating: Making Freezer Meals With Lentils, Chickpeas and Split Peas - FN1787
This publication provides background on making freezer meals featuring pulse recipes.
Quick Facts: Your Game Plan: Healthful Snacking for Sports Fans - FN1406
Your favorite team is winning and you just watched the best half-time show you have ever seen. You reach into the bowl of crunch snacks and discover it's empty. How did that happen? Included in this publication are tips to manage snacking, ideas on how to make snacks healthier, along with recipes to enjoy.
Quick Facts: Grill Something Different! - FN1420
Who knew an entire meal could be prepared on the grill? Try these recipes the next time you want to ignite your guests' taste buds.
Quick Facts for Men: Keep Yourself Tuned Up with Good Nutrition - FN1428
Your body and your vehicle have one very important thing in common: They both need to be maintained. This publication will show you the best way to keep your body running smoothly.
Is Food In My Kitchen a Safety Hazard? - FN492
Follow these food handling guidelines to prevent foodborne illness.
Food Storage Guide Answers the Question...How long can I store - FN579
This publication provides handling tips and recommendations for storing food in your cupboards, refrigerator or freezer.
Fight BAC! Fight Foodborne Bacteria- FN582
Be a BAC Fighter and Fight BAC! Clean, separate, cook and chill.
Fight BAC! Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables - FN608
Handling fruits and vegetables safely is easy. Although an invisible enemy may be in your kitchen, by practicing the recommendations here you can Fight BAC!
BAC Down! Keep Cold Foods Cold - FN612
Give bacteria the cold shoulder. Find the Chill challenge, the chill solution and the cool rules in this brochure.
Keep Food Safe from Store to Storage; Shopping Food Safety Facts - FN717
Prevent foodborne illness every step of the way from store to storage by following the suggestions in this publication.
Keep Hot Foods Hot and Cold Foods Cold: A Consumer Guide to Thermometers and Safe Temperatures - FN1348
Cooks should not depend on their instincts, cooking time, oven temperature or product appearance to determine when a product is done. Use this guide for thermometers and safe temperatures.
Germ Defense Pyramid - FN1349
This publication provides timetables and solution recommendations for cleaning and disinfecting your home.
Brown Baggin' It; A Guide to Lunches on the Go - FN1416
Follow the tips here to pack a safe and nutritious lunch.
Wash Your Hands! - FN1444
No matter the language, hand washing is an important step in the fight against germs. Follow these guidelines for proper hand-washing practices.
Handling Food Through Floods - FN1549
Flood water may carry silt, raw sewage, oil or chemical waste. If foods have been in contact with flood waters, use this information to determine their safety.
Keep Food Safe at Community Dinners and Potlucks - FN619
Safe food handling is important, especially when groups of people are fed at community events. Temperature control is a critical issue for volunteer food handlers. keep food safe when preparing and serving food to large groups.
Keep Hot Foods Hot and Cold Foods Cold: A Foodservice Guide to Thermometers and Safe Temperatures - FN712
Chef's should not depend on their instincts, cooking time, oven temperature or product appearance to determine when a product is done: thermometers are important tools for protecting foods.
It's Clean, But Is It Sanitized? - FN1350
Find out the difference between cleaning and sanitizing.
Poster-Food Safety Guidelines for Emergency Mass Feeding Shelters-Safe Food Handling - DE1544
This poster gives the guidelines for emergency mass feeding shelters.
Poster-Food Safety Guidelines for Emergency Mass Feeding Shelters-Facility/Equipment Safety - DE1545
This poster gives the guidelines for facility/equipment used in emergency mass feeding shelters.
Keep Food Safe During Grilling Season - FN658
Keep your grill season safe with the guidelines outlined in this publication.
Keep Food Safe When Camping and Hiking - FN659
Summer is a great time to enjoy the outdoors. Follow these tips to keep food safe while you're enjoying the great outdoors.
Keep Food Safe During Summer Picnics - FN661
Although mosquitoes and flies can be annoying pests at picnics, the "bugs" you can't see, such as harmful bacteria, are a bigger problem. Use these tips to beat bacteria at your summer picnic.
Safe and Healthy Eating During Pregnancy - FN657
During pregnancy, women are more vulnerable to food-borne illness because of hormone changes that lower immunity. Fortunately, most cases of food-borne illness can be prevented by following the guidelines provided in this publication.
Making Magic Mixes: Meat Mixes - FN621
Homemade mixes can save time and money. You can make meat mixes ahead of time and freeze them for future use in spaghetti, casseroles and tacos. Adding ingredients such as onions and celery improves flavor and nutrition. To stretch your budget, shop for ingredients when they are on sale. Label with date of purchase.
Quick Facts:Becoming the Grill Master - FN1412
When done right, grilling can be one of the more healthful ways to prepare food. Preparing meats and poultry on the grill allows excess fat to drip away. Very little fat needs to be added to foods cooked on the grill.
Keeping Fruits and Vegetables Fresh and Safe from Plant to Palate - FN690
Even though fruits, vegetables and juice are nutritious parts of the diet, you need to take some food safety precautions. For example, contaminated melons, sprouts and raspberries have been linked with foodborne illness outbreaks.
Safe Food for Babies: Handling Breast Milk, Formula and Baby Food - FN656
Infants and young children are most at risk for foodborne illness because their immune systems are not fully developed. Follow the tips in this publication to keep breast milk, formula and baby food safe for babies.
Safe Food for Babies and Children: A Guide for Babysitters- Babysitter Edition - FN662
Babysitting is a great way to earn money, help neighbors and gain job experience. It's a big responsibility, too. When parents trust you to babysit, they are placing their children's health and safety in your hands. Infants and young children are especially vulnerable to foodborne illness and even a small error in food preparation could cause severe illness. Read this publication to learn more about what jobs to accept, how to handle emergencies and how to be safe in the kitchen when preparing and serving food.
Safe Food for Babies and Children: A Guide for Babysitters- Parents Edition - FN663
As a parent, you most likely will need a babysitter to look after your children at some time. Infants and young children are especially vulnerable to foodborne illness, and even a small error in food preparation can cause severe illness. Making sure your babysitter is prepared to provide care safely will assure a positive experience for both you and your sitter.
Safe Food For Babies and Children: Choking Dangers - FN664
Every child is at risk of choking: Older infants and children less than 5 years old easily can choke on food, toys and household objects. A single choking incident may result in death, permanent brain damage due to lack of oxygen and other complications associated with airway blockage. This publication provides tips on choking prevention.
Safe Food for Babies and Children: Heating Solid Food Safely - FN715
Whether warming bottles or solid foods, it is ALWAYS important to use safe heating practices to keep your baby happy and healthy. Although you may be an expert at feeding your little one, remember that babysitters and family members may not know how to heat bottles and food correctly. Leaving complete instructions in a handy location, such as on the refrigerator door, may help you and the caregiver feel comfortable and relaxed come feeding time.
Safe Food for Babies and Children: Warming Bottles Safely - FN716
For the first year of a baby's life, breast milk or infant formula should be used to provide the nutrition necessary to promote growth and general health. Pre-mixed infant formula and expressed breast milk do not need to be heated prior to feeding. However, many babies prefer warm bottles because of the similarity to warm milk fed from the breast.
Questions and Answers About Storing Food in the Freezer - FN1465
A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.
Questions and Answers About Storing Food in the Refrigerator - FN1466 -
A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.
Questions and Answers About Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables - FN1467
A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.
Questions and Answers About Storing Canned and Packaged Food - FN1468
A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.
Seniors and Food Safety: To Market, To Market - FN700
This publication provides you with tips to prevent foodborne illness, beginning with the trip to the supermarket and ending with the proper temperatures the food should be cooked.
Now Serving Nutritious After School Snacks - FN1379
Providing nutritious snacks doesn’t have to be expensive but you may need to do some planning to make them readily available for your child. Getting kids to eat fruits and vegetables can be difficult. Make snack time fun. For example, provide a variety of cut-up fruits and vegetables and let your kids create their own kabobs. You also may want to try serving vegetables with low-fat dip to make them more appealing.
Eat Smart: Enjoy Healthier Snacks at Work - FN1398
Are you tempted by bowls of candy and trays of cookies at work? Say no to secondhand sweets, and think twice about the food you offer at meetings and around the office. Are you eating enough fruits, vegetables and whole grains? Eating small, frequent, healthy meals or snacks will keep your energy up and make you less likely to overeat at your next meal.
Exercise Your Brain - FN1431
Physical activity helps maintain good blood flow to the brain. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that most adults get 30 minutes of moderate activity most days, preferably every day. Short segments of physical activity (such as three 10-minute walks) count toward the goal. Stimulate your brain by adding variety to your activities. Try a new activity, alternate activities throughout the week or take a new route when you walk or jog. Routine activities don’t challenge your brain, so mix it up a little.
Now Serving: Recipe Makeovers - FN1447
Learn to prepare your old family favorites in new, healthier ways with these recipe makeovers. Not all recipes need a makeover. If you can answer yes to the following questions, the recipe might be right for a makeover.
Fellowship Food: Nourishing the Body and the Soul - FN1449
Help people stay healthy by providing nourishing options. Many people shortchange themselves on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Eating a diet rich in these foods can promote good health by helping reduce our risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases. If you are bringing a dish to a potluck, consider providing the veggies, fruits or whole grains. Bring a large nutrient-rich salad with a variety of greens and sprinkle with dried fruit and nuts or seeds. Bring whole-grain bread or crackers.
Vary Your Veggies: Why Eat Vegetables - FN1452
Vegetables are versatile, nutritious, colorful and flavorful. Not only are they naturally low in calories, fat and sodium, but they also are good sources of important vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. Vegetables do not contain cholesterol. Increasing vegetable consumption can replace foods higher in calories and fat. Vegetables are rich sources of vitamins, particularly A and C. The value of a vegetable as a source of a nutrient is affected both by the amount of the nutrient present and by the amount of the vegetable eaten.
Vary Your Veggies: How to Prepare Vegetables - FN1453
Try something new! To take advantage of all their benefits, eat a variety of colors every day and vary your cooking methods to add variety to your menus. Cooking methods: microwave, steam, sitr-fry, pan, bake, broil.
Vary Your Veggies: Add Some Vegetables to your Diet - FN1454
Keep washed, ready-to-eat vegetables on hand and easy to find. How many times does someone in your family open the refrigerator door to see what there is to eat and take one of the first foods he or she sees? So let the cleaned vegetables be seen first. Also, set them out when meals and snacks are eaten. On the run? Cut up some veggies and put them in zip-top bags. Stop in the produce department to see if some vegetables are cut up and ready to eat for a snack. If you do not have a cooler or refrigerator nearby, remember to eat cut-up produce within two hours for safety.
Who Needs a Healthy Breakfast? Everybody Does! - FN728
Eat Smart! Start your day off with breakfast. This publication makes learning fun with fill in the blank and word find quizzes.
Vary Your Veggies: Serve More Vegetables - FN1455
Most adults and children need 2 to 3 cups of vegetables per day, but the amount varies depending on age, gender and amount of physical activity.
Now Serving Lean Beef - FN711
Beef is a versatile menu item whether you’re cooking for one, two or a crowd. Beef provides protein, vitamins and minerals. A typical serving size for beef and other meat is 3 ounces, which is about the size of a deck of cards. A 3-ounce serving of lean ground beef has about 180 calories, 10 grams of fat and 15 percent of the daily recommendation for iron.
Look After Your Eyes - FN710
This is a short guide to age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in the United States for people over age 60.
Eating For Your Eye Health - FN709
We cannot change our genetic inheritance, but we can exercise and eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
What Color is Your Food? - FN595
People need different amounts of fruits and vegetables depending on their age, gender and amount of daily physical actiivity. Taste a rainbow of fruits and vegetables for better health.
From The Garden or Orchard to the Table: Jams and Jellies from North Dakota Fruits - FN590
What kinds of fruit can be successfully grown in North Dakota? What are some tested and tasty recipes for making the preserves? That’s what this circular is all about — growing and preserving the fruits of summer!
Have a Healthy Heart - FN589
On average, your heart beats about 100,000 times per day, pumping nutrients and oxygen throughout the body. Taking this hard-working group of muscles for granted can be easy. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. The purpose of this publication is to increase awareness of heart disease risk factors for women and ways for everyone to improve heart health through lifestyle choices. Having regular checkups and discussing any health-related issues with your physician or health-care provider is important.
Have a Healthy Heart - FN589 - Condensed Version
Have you thought about your heart lately? On average, your heart beats about 100,000 times per day, pumping nutrients and oxygen throughout the body. Taking this hard-working group of muscles for granted can be easy. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. This is the condensed version of the 8 page FN589, "Have a Healthy Heart".
Vary Your Veggies: How to Select and Store Vegetables - FN1456
What veggies are in your refrigerator, freezer or pantry?
Rate Your Fiber Fitness - FN1458
Fiber isn’t a “miracle food,”but adding fiber-rich foods to your diet can have health benefits. The National Cancer Institute suggests that foods high in fiber may be protective against some cancers, particularly colon cancer. Although the National Cancer Institute recommends getting 20 to 35 grams of fiber per day. Soluble fiber (found in oats, dry edible beans, barley and fruits) helps lower blood cholesterol and may reduce the risk of heart disease. Insoluble fiber (found in wheat bran, whole-wheat products and vegetables) helps prevent ulcers, constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis. High fiber foods usually are low in calories and many are inexpensive, too.
Add Fiber to Your Diet - FN1459
Having more fiber in your diet helps lower blood cholesterol and prevents constipation, and ma help prevent cancer. Many people shortchange themselves on the 20 to 35 grams per day fiber recommendation. The average American consumes 10 to 15 grams of fiber per day.
Fast Fiber Facts - FN1460
The National Institutes of Health recommends 20 to 35 grams of fiber daily for older children, adolescents and adults. Increase your fiber intake slowly, and drink plenty of water to avoid digestive upset.
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