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Funding Assistance Programs for Irrigation Development in North Dakota -AE1674
This publications provides information on financial incentives for irrigators and irrigation districts.
Crambe Production - A1010
Crambe is native to the Mediterranean region. It was introduced into the U.S. during the 1940s and has been grown intermittently at North Dakota Research Extension Centers since 1958. Commercial production of crambe in North Dakota began in 1990.
Swathing and Harvesting Canola - A1171
The timing of swathing canola is important for quality and yield. This publication provides information about the proper stage to swath canola and the effect of swathing time on yield, green seed and percent oil. A description is provided about how to set the swather and combine to optimize the yield and quality of canola.
Planning To Irrigate: A Checklist - AE92
Installing an irrigation system on a piece of land requires a great deal of planning and a significant financial investment.
Care and Maintenance of Irrigation Wells - AE97
Effective irrigation is not possible without a reliable water source. In North Dakota, the availability of relatively shallow aquifers with high-quality water has spurred the development of irrigation in many areas. Irrigation wells must produce a high volume of water during the driest months: July and August. To maintain consistent, high production from year to year, a well requires annual maintenance, just like any other piece of valuable equipment.
Dry Bean Production Guide - A1133
Dry bean is a food crop that requires the producers to provide special cultural management and attention. Proper management is essential from cultivar selection, field selection and planting through harvest, plus marketing for maximum profitability. This guide helps producers meet those production challenges.
Houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale L.) Identification and Control - Stop the Spread - W1307
Houndstongue is a biennial, poisonous herb that is native to Eurasia. The plant is a member of the Borage family, which includes more commonly known plants such as Virginia bluebells, forget-me-nots and the fiddlenecks. Houndstongue commonly is found in disturbed areas, including roadsides and trails, and in pasture and woodlands following soil disturbance or overgrazing.
Identification and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) - W1132
Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.
Know Your Knapweeds - W1146
North Dakota is being threatened by three noxious weeds that could infest more acreage in the state and at a faster rate than leafy spurge. Members of this trio include spotted, diffuse, and Russian knapweed. These three knapweeds already infest more acreage than leafy spurge in Montana and Minnesota, and have been found in over 25 counties in North Dakota. Knapweeds are related to thistles and can spread even faster.
Perennial and Biennial Thistle Control - W799
Thistles are especially troublesome following cool, wet summers and falls, when seed production and seedling establishment are high. An integrated weed control program that combines chemical, cultural (such as crop rotation or grass competition), mechanical and biological methods is most likely to be successful.
Integrated Management of Leafy Spurge - W866
Leafy spurge is the most difficult noxious weed to control in North Dakota and infests all 53 counties in a variety of environments. Leafy spurge is found in pasture, rangeland, cropland, roadsides, shelterbelts, and other non-cultivated areas. Cultivation will control leafy spurge in conventional cropland, but the weed can become the dominant species in reduced-till cropland, pas-ture, and rangeland if not controlled.
Leafy Spurge Control Using Flea Beetles - W1183
Leafy spurge is an exotic perennial weed that infests over 800,000 acres in North Dakota. Although leafy spurge can be successfully controlled with herbicides, treating large acreages is not cost-effective. In fact, approximately 40 percent of the leafy spurge infested rangeland has a carrying capacity below the herbicide cost break-even point. Using biological agents to control leafy spurge has become an economic alternative in many locations in the state.
Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa Lam.) - W842
Spotted knapweed is an aggressive, introduced weed species that rapidly invades pasture, rangeland and fallow land and causes a serious decline in forage and crop production. The weed is a prolific seed producer with 1000 or more seeds per plant. Seed remains viable in the soil five years or more, so infestations may occur a number of years after vegetative plants have been eliminated. Spotted knapweed has few natural enemies and is consumed by livestock only when other vegetation is unavailable. The plant releases a toxin that reduces growth of forage species. Areas heavily infested with spotted knapweed often must be reseeded once the plant is controlled.
The Thistles of North Dakota - W1120
Thistles in agriculture have a reputation as a sign of untidiness and neglect, and are often found on good ground not properly cared for. However, this unfortunate characteristic is only true of a few invasive species and is not accurate for the vast majority of native thistles which have many useful traits.
Soybean Soil Fertility - SF1164
Soybean is unique in nutritional needs in the state compared to other crops. Inoculation, fertilizer application and iron deficiency chlorosis are explained.
Integrated Pest Management of Alfalfa Weevil in North Dakota - E1676
The alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is found throughout the U.S. and is the major insect pest of alfalfa in North Dakota. Loss of plant biomass, especially leaf tissue, can be severe. Leaf feeding by alfalfa weevil also reduces nutritional quality and digestibility. Depending on the year, yield loss due to alfalfa weevil can approach 100 percent, especially under drought conditions.
Grain Drying - AE701
Grain drying, as used in this publication, refers to the removal of some of the moisture from grain by mechanically moving air through the grain after it has been harvested. Grain in the field dries naturally as the crop matures, giving up mois-ture to the air until the grain moisture is in equilibrium with the moisture in the air (equilibrium moisture content). Conditions become less favorable for grain to dry to moisture contents considered safe for storage as the harvest is delayed into late fall.
Frequently Asked Questions About Subsurface (Tile) Drainage - AE1690
Installation of subsurface (tile) drainage systems in the upper Great Plains, especially the Red River of the North valley, has increased since the late 1990s. A wet climate cycle, along with increased crop prices and land values, are the major reasons this technology is being put to use. As a relatively new practice in this region, many questions are being asked about tile drainage. This publication attempts to provide some answers.
North Dakota Hard Red Spring Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A574-13
Hard red spring (HRS) wheat was harvested from 5.06 million acres in 2013, down from 5.75 million acres in 2012. The average yield of spring wheat was 46 bushels/acre (bu/a), up slightly from the yield of 45 bu/a recorded last year.
North Dakota Durum Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A1067-13
Durum was planted on 795,000 acres in North Dakota in 2013, down from the 1.4 million acres planted in 2012. Average yield is estimated at 38 bushels per acre, up from the yield of 32 bushels per acre recorded last year.
North Dakota Barley, Oat and Rye Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A1049-13
Barley, oat and rye varieties currently grown in North Dakota are described in the following tables. Successful production of these crops depends on numerous factors, including selecting the right variety for a particular area. Characteristics to evaluate in selecting a variety are: yield potential in your area, test weight, straw strength, plant height, reaction to problematic diseases and maturity. Selecting varieties with good quality also is important to maintain market recognition. Because malting barley is purchased on an identity-preserved basis, producers are encouraged to determine which barley varieties are being purchased by potential barley buyers before selecting a variety. When selecting a high-yielding and good-quality variety, use data that summarizes several years and locations.
Clubroot of Canola Alert - PP1700
Clubroot is caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae. The pathogen survives in the soil and infects the roots of canola and other Brassicae plants (such as broccoli, cauliflower, Shepherd’s purse and wild mustard), causing a galling and swelling, and giving them a “club” appearance.
North Dakota Dry Pea Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A1469
Field pea fits well into small-grain rotations. The green- and yellow-seeded varieties are used for human consumption as dry split peas. Field peas also are used as protein concentrates for livestock and pigeon feeds. In North Dakota, pea yields are similar to hard red spring wheat yields. Field pea stems grow to a length of 33 to 36 inches, and the plant reaches maximum height at the early pod fill stage. A cool growing season (a mean temperature of 55 to 65 degrees) is necessary for optimum pea yields. Hot weather during flowering may result in a reduced seed set.
North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A1196
During the 2012-13 growing season, 220,000 acres were planted to winter wheat, with 205,000 acres harvested. The area harvested was down substantially from last year’s record area harvested of 700,000 acres. The state’s winter wheat yield this season was estimated at 43 bushels per acre (bu/a), which also is down from last year’s yield of 55 bu/a. Establishing winter wheat was problematic due to dry conditions in the fall of 2012, which not only impacted the area planted,
2017 Sugarbeet Production Guide - A1698
The production guide will provide useful information to assist you in making timely management decisions.
Soybean Production Field Guide for North Dakota and Northwestern Minnesota - A1172
The production guide will provide useful information to assist you in making timely management decisions.
A Guide to North Dakota Noxious and Troublesome Weeds - W1691
This guide was made with collaboration of the author with the North Dakota State University Extension Service and the North Dakota Department of Agriculture, with funding from the U.S. Forest Service. This publication is designed to help land managers identify the state- or county-listed noxious weeds. Other species included are those with the most potential to spread within the state or into North Dakota from bordering states.
Pea Seed-borne Mosaic Virus (PSbMV) in Field Peas and Lentils - PP1704
Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) is an economically damaging viral pathogen of field peas and lentils that can cause significant losses in seed yield and quality, especially when infections occur before or during bloom. It has been observed on field peas and lentils in North Dakota and on field peas in Montana. PSbMV is distributed worldwide, and it presumably was introduced to North Dakota and Montana on seed imported from other regions.
2013 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticide Use in MInnesota and North Dakota - E1710
The 2013 dry bean grower survey is the 24th annual survey of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northharvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Air Temperature Inversions Causes, Characteristics and Potential Effects on Pesticide Spray Drift - AE1705
Temperature inversions are micro-climatic events that can significantly contribute to off target movement of pesticides. This publication explains in detail: what they are, why they develop, how they are impacted by land condition, how to identify them, how to measure them, and how to minimize their impact on pesticide applications. Professional applicators, private applicators using pesticides on their farm or ranch, state and federal regulators, pesticide safety educators, researchers, and industry should benefit from the comprehensive explanations found in AE1705.
Pesticide Use and Pest Management Practices in ND, 2012 - W1711
This is the ninth major account of pesticide usage inNorth Dakota and describes pesticide usage onagricultural land in 2012. The information is derived from a comprehensive survey of North Dakota farm operators.
Spray Equipment and Calibration - AE73
Many pesticides used to control weeds, insects, and disease in field crops, ornamentals, turf, fruits, vegetables, and rights-of-way are applied with hydraulic sprayers. Tractor- mounted, pull-type, pickup-mounted and self-propelled sprayers are available from numerous manufacturers to do all types of spraying.
Selected Management Factors for Economically Increasing Soybean Yield - A1718
Soybean yield increased with 14-inch versus 28-inch rows, 200,000 versus 150,000 pls/acre planting rate and special foliar inputs. The narrow rows also had higher net revenue than 28-inch rows. However, the low planting rate and no foliar inputs provided higher net revenue after costs of research factors versus the alternative choice for each factor.
Soil Fertility Recommendations for Corn - SF722
Nitrogen recommendations have been revised to consider region, soil, tillage system and irrigation/dryland management. Phosphorus, potassium, sulfur and zinc recommendations are included.
Sunflower Disease Diagnostic Series - PP 1727
The series contains 20 colored cards of symptoms and important facts of sunflower diseases.
Active Optical Sensor Algorithms: How they work and how they can be used to calculate N requirements in the field - SF1176-5
Research from 2011 to 2013 has resulted in a data base that supports to use of active-optical sensors to direct side-dress N rates in corn. Previously, rates were determined using a grower best guess.
Soybean Cyst Nematode - PP1732
Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most damaging soybean disease in the United States. Since its first detection in ND it has spread to a dozen counties. This publication includes information about the SCN symptoms, biology, sampling and management.
Fungal Leaf Spot Diseases of Wheat: Tan Spot, Stagonospora nodorum bloch and septoria tritici blotch - PP1249
This publication provides information for the identification and management of the common fungal leaf spot diseases found in wheat in North Dakota
Pythium Damping-off of Soybean - PP1737
Pythium damping off causes stand loss and yield reduction in North Dakota. The disease is particularly damaging in cool and wet soils. The pathogens involved, biology, identification and management are discussed.
Internal Physiological Disorders: Internal Heat Necrosis and Blackheart - A1738
Internal physiological disorders reduce the quality and marketability of potatoes. This publication explains internal heat necrosis and blackheart of potato tubers and some management strategies for reducing this problem.
Sunflower Production - A1331
This publication is a revision of the “Sunflower Production and Marketing Bulletin” published in 1994. The purpose is to update information and provide a production and pest management guide for sunflower growers. This revised publication is directed primarily to the commercial production of sunflower, not to marketing and processing. It will attempt to give specific guidelines and recommendations on production practices, pest identifi cation and pest management, based on current information.
Selecting High-quality Seed of Cereal Grains - A500
The publication provides information to growers on important characteristics to consider when selecting a seedlot.
A Basic Primer on Biotechnology - A1219
This publication provides basic information about biotechnology and how it can be used to enhance agricultural crops.
2014 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticide Use in MInnesota and North Dakota - E1750
The 2014 dry bean grower survey is the 25th annual review of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Fertilizer Application With Small-grain Seed at Planting - SF1751
Applying fertilizer with the seed at planting is one successful soil management practice that has long been recognized as a means to improve small grain yields. Grain seeders have been adapted with fertilizer attachments, enabling farmers to apply a small amount of fertilizer with the seed and plant in one operation.
Soybean Growth and Management Quick Guide - A1174
Growth, development and yield of soybeans are a result of a variety’s genetic potential interacting with environmental and farming practices. Correct production decisions using plant growth staging and timing are important for successful soybean production. Minimizing environmental stress will optimize seed yield.
Bones are Bad in Potato Production - A1772
The goal of potato growers is to produce a high-yielding, high-quality crop that is safe for consumption. Animal bones, a foreign material, are a food safety risk, and fields that have bones in the soil are not suitable for potato production.
From Garden to Table: My Potatoes Turned Green Now What? - A1768
Potato tubers turn green when they are exposed to sunlight during growth or storage. The green comes from the pigment chlorophyll. Potato tubers exposed to light will become green naturally as the plant seeks to harvest the light.
Potato Tuber Viruses: Mop-top Management -A1777
The Potato mop-top virus causes tuber quality problems. Infection on tubers may be expressed as arc or rings on the tuber surface, deep cracking and distortions to the skin that compromising tuber quality. Care must be taken not to infest fields with PMTV from known powdery scab and PMTV infected fields and by avoiding PMTV or powdery scab-infected seed tubers.
North Dakota Fresh Market Potato Cultivar/Selection Trial Results for 2015 - A1783
Potatoes reported were selected from recently released cultivars or from advancing selections, or cultivars that are new to the United States. This includes red-and yellow-skinned cultivars grown near Crystal, ND and contain graded yield results.
Laundering Pesticide-contaminated Work Clothes - PS1778
This publication discusses methods of handling pesticide contaminated work clothing in the home. It reviews proper washing techniques. Finally, it explains the limitations of applying recommendations developed in the 1980s and 1990s with contemporary wash equipment, detergents, generally lower toxicity pesticides and new fabrics and finishes.
Fertilizing Sunflower - SF713
This revision is the results of 48 field trials from 2012-2015 studying the yield and oil response of sunflower to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer. The new recommendations include no phosphorus needed for sunflower and nitrogen rate based on region, tillage, soil test nitrate with a cap due to excessive lodging potential at high nitrogen rates.
Bringing Land in the Conservation Reserve Program Back Into Crop Production or Grazing - A1364
This publication provides guidelines for farmers wishing to convert CRP into crop production.
2015 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticide Use in MN and ND - E1802
The 2015 dry bean grower survey is the 26th annual survey of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Sugar Beet Cyst Nematode - PP1788
This publication describes symptoms of plants infested with SBCN and the life cycle of SBCN. Practices to manage the pests are outlined.
ND Small Grain Insects Cereal Leaf Beetle - E1230
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of cereal leaf beetle including identification, life cycle, crop damage, host plants, degree day forecasting, field scouting, economic threshold, biological control and chemical control.
Impact of Planting Dates on Dry Edible Bean - A1806
This publication is a production reference to highlight new planting date research.
Soil Testing Unproductive Areas - SF1809
This publication is intended to provide information on how to sample and analyze area that are affected by soil salinity and sodicity. It explains how to take soil samples representing the affected areas, what kind of tests are needed to assess salt and sodium levels and how to interpret the results.
Pythium Damping-off of Soybean - PP1737
Pythium damping off causes stand loss and yield reduction in North Dakota. The disease is particularly damaging in cool and wet soils. The pathogens involved, biology, identification and management are discussed.
Pea Disease Diagnostic Series - PP1790
This publication is an aid in disease identification.
Leaf-feeding Weevil in Sugar Beets - E1273
A leaf-feeding weevil, Tanymecus confusus, first was observed feeding on sugar beets in the southern portion of the Red River Valley (Richland County, N.D., and Wilkin County, Minn.) in 1975. The weevil has since caused problems for growers in southern Minnesota (Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui Parle and Swift counties) in 1992 and 1997, and again in Richland County of North Dakota in 2004. A related species, Tanymecus palliatus , is an occasional pest of sugar beets in Europe. Feeding injury by adult Tanymecus confusus typically occurs in small areas within sugar beet fields. Damage is occasionally severe enough to require replanting.
North Dakota Hard Red Spring Wheat and Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A574-16
This publication summarizes data from variety trials conducted in the main research centers in North Dakota.
North Dakota Durum Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A1067-16
This publication contains the results from multiple locations of the performance adapted varieties of durum.
North Dakota Barley, Oat and Rye Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A1049-16
This publication contains the results from multiple locations on the performance of adapted varieties of barley, oat and rye.
North Dakota Dry Pea Performance Testing 2016 - A1469-16
The North Dakota Pea Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on Field Pea performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of Dry Pea Varieties for agricultural production in ND.
North Dakota Soybean Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A843
The ND Soybean Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on soybean performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of soybean varieties for agricultural production in ND.
North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2016 - A793
This publication reports the results from the various corn hybrid trials conducted in ND during the 2016 growing season. Summary tables for each experimental location contain the yield and moisture at harvest of the hybrids tested.
North Dakota Dry Bean Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A654
The ND Dry Bean Variety Trial Results provide producers with data or bean performance throughout the state gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of Dry Bean Varieties for agricultural production in ND.
Stubby Root Nematode and Sampling in Sugar Beet - A1821
Stubby root nematode (SRN) represents an economically important group of nematodes belonging to the genera Trichodorus and Paratrichodorus. SRN often are found in light (sandy) soils and are more problematic when cool, wet soil conditions exist. For example, yield losses as high as 50 percent can be observed in cool and wet growing seasons.
North Dakota and South Dakota Sunflower Hybrid Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A652
The North Dakota and South Dakota Trial Results provide producers with data related to the hybrid performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of sunflower hybrids for agricultural production in North Dakota.
Managing Lenticel Spot on Potato Tubers - A1822
Lenticels in potato tubers are an unsightly blemish. These blemishes may reduce marketability of tubers and be an entry point for pathogens. Learn about how lenticel spot is caused and tips on managing this disorder.
Potato Diagnostics Clipboard - A1817
This is a quick identification help guide for potato problems.
Northern Plains Fresh Market Potato Cultivar/Selection Trial Results for 2016 (A1834)
Potatoes reported were selected from recently released cultivars or from advancing selections, or cultivars that are new to the United States. This includes red-and-yellow-skinned cultivars grown near Big Lake MN and contain graded yield results
Nitrogen Extenders and Additives for Field Crops (SF1581)
Nitrogen is lost from soil through the activity of soil bacterial transformation of ammonium to nitrate, and from nitrate, the N can be lost leaching or denitrifcation. There are chemistries available that inhibit the transformation of ammonium to nitrate, and there are also compounds that inhibit urease enzyme activity, decreasing the risk of ammonia volatility.
Potato Production Problems (A1817)
This has been designed for a clipboard to help with potato diagnostics program.
Dry Edible Bean Disease Diagnostic Series (PP1820)
This publication is a pictorial guide of Dry Edible Bean diseases.
2016 DRY BEAN Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticide Use in Minnesota and North Dakota (E1841)
The 2016 dry bean grower survey is the 27th annual survey of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Grower Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Sunflower Disease Diagnostic Series (PP1727)
This series aids in disease identification.
Late Blight in Potato (PP1849)
Late blight is caused by the funguslike oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. This potentially devastating disease can infect potato foliage and tubers at any stage of crop development.
Field Guide to Sustainable Production of High-quality Durum Wheat in North Dakota (A1825)
This publication provide guidelines as to the best practices for the production of durum wheat with a focus on its production in North Dakota. It addresses the major production practices of planting date, variety selection, fertility management, and pest control.
Corn Response to Phosphorus Starter Fertilizer in North Dakota (A1851)
This is a production reference to highlight corn starter research.
Reducing Spray Drift (AE-1210)
Spray drift is becoming an increasingly important part of every spraying operation. More diversification of crops, more active and non-selective herbicides, and a greater awareness of pesticides in the environment has caused spray drift management to become every applicator’s business.
Strip Till for Field Crop Production (AE1370 (Revised))
This publication explains strip till purposes, equipment options, research and applications to specific crops.
Anhydrous Ammonia: Managing The Risks
Anhydrous ammonia has the potential to be one of the most dangerous chemicals used in agriculture today. It is used and stored under high pressures, which requires specially designed and well-maintained equipment. Those who work with anhydrous ammonia must be trained to follow exact procedures in handling it.
Anhydrous Ammonia: Managing The Risks (AE-1149 (Revised))
Anhydrous ammonia has the potential to be one of the most dangerous chemicals used in agriculture today. It is used and stored under high pressures, which requires specially designed and well-maintained equipment. Those who work with anhydrous ammonia must be trained to follow exact procedures in handling it.
Agricultural Remote Sensing Basics (AE1262)
When farmers or ranchers observe their fields or pastures to assess their condition without physically touching them, it is a form of remote sensing. Observing the colors of leaves or the overall appearances of plants can determine the plant’s condition. Remotely sensed images taken from satellites and aircraft provide a means to assess field conditions without physically touching them from a point of view high above the field.
Integrated Pest Management of Corn Rootworms in North Dakota (E1852)
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of corn rootworms in field corn including identification, life cycle, crop damage, field scouting, thresholds, root injury ratings, cultural control, Bt corn hybrids, biological and chemical control.
Plant Disease Management: Deoxynivalenol (DON) in Small Grains (PP1302)
The publication provides information for commonly asked questions on DON/VOM found in small grains. Additional information is provided on management of DON/VOM.
Integrated Pest Management of Japanese Beetle in North Dakota (E1631 (Revised))
This publication describes the identification, biology, damage and pest management strategies for control of the Japanese beetle. In 2012, Japanese beetle was detect at several locations across North Dakota. This revised publication summarizes where it has be intercepted and is likely established in North Dakota
Selecting Spray Nozzles to Reduce Particle Drift (AE1246)
This technical bulletin provides characteristics of various nozzles to enable the efficacious application of pesticides and to minimize particle movement to no-target organisms and soil.
Irrigation Water Sample Analysis (AE1360 )
The NDSU Soil and Water Testing Laboratory has been making soil-water compatibility recommendations since the early 1960s. These recommendations are based on the electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) determined on the irrigation water and the soil series present on the land to be irrigated.
Organic Management of Canada Thistle (W1860)
This publication is a description of management options and methods for Canada thistle.
Irrigation Water Pumps (AE1057 (Revised)
A pump is the heart of most irrigation systems and if not maintained can use much more power than required leading to excess pumping costs and wasting electricity.
Documentation for Suspected Herbicide Drift Damage (WC751 (Revised)
Herbicide drift to nontarget plants can cause damage sufficient to result in a significant monetary loss.
Soil Fertility Considerations for Buckwheat in North Dakota SF724 (Revised)
Buckwheat is grown every year in North Dakota and is an important specialty crop grown for grain in conventional and organic farming systems. It's ability to cycle phosphorus from slowly available to more available forms is referred to in this update.
Fertilizing Flax SF717 (Revised)
Flax is an ancient crop. Evidence indicates it was cultivated in the Middle East as early as 7000 B.C. Ancient Egyptians cultivated flax extensively as a fiber crop for linen production, while other peoples utilized the seed for food as well as the fiber. Today, growers in Canada and the U.S. grow seed flax varieties.
Fertilizing Pinto, Navy and Other Dry Edible Bean SF720 (Revised)
Dry beans are unique in crop fertilizer needs. This circular directs growers to an appropriate strategy for fertilizer efficiency and high yielding, high quality dry bean harvests.
Soil Fertility Recommendations for Corn SF722 (Revised)
These recommendations are updated to include new potassium recommendations based on recent research.
FERTILIZING CANOLA and MUSTARD SF1122 (Revised)
This is an updated circular for a crop that is important to the livelihood of North Dakota framers north of highway 2, generally. All references to yield-based nutrient formulas are taken out of this revision.
North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results Variety Trail Results for 2017 and Selection Guide (A1196)
This is the results of winter wheat trials conducted throughout the state. The result tables provide data that can be used to select winter wheat varieties that performed well in 2017.
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