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North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2014 - A793-14
This publication reports the results of corn hybrid trials that were conducted by NDSU research and Extension personnel throughout North Dakota. The hybrids tested were entered voluntarily by the companies that market them, and the management of these trials was financed partially by the entry fee those companies paid.
Corn Gluten Feed: Composition, Storage, Handling, Feeding and Value - AS1127
This publication explains what corn gluten feed is and it's use as animal feed.
Harvesting, Storing and Feeding High-moisture Corn - AS1484
High-moisture corn (HMC) offers many advantages for producers who feed beef or dairy cattle. However, successfully using high-moisture corn requires attention to harvest timing, processing, storage conditions and feeding management.
Utilizing Corn Residue in Beef Cattle Diets - AS1548
Corn residue is a useful feedstuff for beef cattle. Producers should consider incorporating these fee resources into their grazing and feeding programs to reduce the cost of production.
Integrated Pest Management of the Wheat Midge in North Dakota - E1330
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of wheat midge including identification, life cycle, crop damage, pheromone trapping, degree day modeling, field scouting, economic threshold, cultural methods biological control and chemical control.
Bertha Armyworm in Canola - E1347
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of bertha armyworm including identification, life cycle, crop damage, pheromone trapping, field scouting, economic threshold, cultural methods, biological control and chemical control.
Integrated Pest Management of Sunflower Insect Pests - E1457
Sunflowers can be a high-risk crop because of potential losses from diseases, insects, birds and weeds. These potential risks require that growers follow integrated pest management (IPM) practices.
Integrated Pest Management of Wheat Stem Sawfly - E1479
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of wheat stem sawfly including identification, life cycle. crop damage, pest monitoring, cultural control, host plant resistance, biological control and chemical control.
Replanting or Late Planting Crops - A934
Replanting when crop damage and stand reduction occurs early in the growing season can be an economically viable option.
North Dakota Alternative Broadleaf Crop Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A1105
This publication is reference to select alternative crops and varieties.
Preventing Hay Fires - DE1589
Excessive moisture is the most common cause of hay fires. A chemical reaction in high-moisture haystacks or bales produces flammable gas that can ignite if the temperature is high enough (about 130 F). Fire is possible in loose, baled or stacked hay stored inside or outside. Hay becomes a fire hazard when the moisture content is 20 percent or higher in small stacked bales and more than 18 percent in stacked large square or round bales. Hay fires usually occur within six weeks of baling.
Anthracnose Alert - PP1603
This devastating disease of dry edible beans has been increasing in North Dakota. This poster provides you with colored pictures that help you identify the disease.
Dry Edible Bean Rust - PP1601
Between 1996 and 2008, bean varieties with resistance to rust made the threat of a bean rust epidemic in North Dakota very low. However, in 2008 a new race of the pathogen was identified in North Dakota. The new race has the ability to cause disease on the only commonly used effective resistance gene in common varieties. In 2010, the new race spread throughout North Dakota and into northwestern Minnesota. With the spread of the new race, the region is at risk again for the multimillion dollar yield losses caused by bean rust decades ago.
Sunflower Rust - PP1557
Sunflower rust is a disease capable of causing yield loss in all sunflower production regions in the U.S. and Manitoba. Severe infection will decrease head size, seed size, oil content and yield. Sunflower rust epidemics are influenced by environmental conditions and the time of disease onset (when rust first occurs); therefore, incidence and severity vary from year to year. According to data collected from National Sunflower Association-sponsored surveys, the incidence and severity of sunflower rust in the U.S. has increased steadily throughout the 2000s. In North Dakota, sunflower rust commonly is reported, and dramatic yield reductions have been recorded in localized “hot spots.”
Ground Application of Fungicide for the Suppression of Fusarium Head Blight in Small Grains - AE1314
Fusarium head blight (FHB) has caused considerable income loss for wheat and barley growers during the past 15 years. Estimates of crop loss to growers in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota are signifi cant. Serious yield and quality losses from FHB occur whenever wet weather coincides with the heading and fl owering stages of the crop.
Bacterial Leaf Streak and Black Chaff of Wheat - PP1566
Bacterial leaf streak has been observed frequently in recent years in North Dakota and in the neighboring states of Minnesota and South Dakota. This 4-colored publication describes the symptoms and comparison to other common wheat diseases in ND and management of BLS and Black Chaff.
Wheat Disease Indentification - PP1552
This publication identifies the many diseases affecting heads and grain, diseases affecting leaves and diseases affecting stem and roots of wheat.
Management of Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugarbeet - PP1495
Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is one of the most severe soil-borne diseases of sugarbeet and a major problem for growers in Minnesota and North Dakota. This publication provides colored pictures of the disease symptoms and management practices.
Rust Diseases of Wheat in North Dakota - PP1361
The revision of PP1361 will update previous information on the three wheat rusts. Growers, consultants and county agents will be able the use this information for disease diagnosis.
2015 North Dakota Field Crop Fungicide Guide - PP622
This fungicide guide is based on the latest information available from the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the agricultural chemical industry.
A Visual Scale to Estimate Severity of Fusarium Head Blight in Wheat - PP1095
Since 1993, Fusarium Head Blight or Scab of wheat has been a serious problem in the northern plains states. Agronomists and pathologists often have estimated severity of the disease under fi eld conditions. Several rating systems and scales have been used by different workers, leading to some confusion.
Anthracnose of Dry Beans - PP1233
Anthracnose is an economically damaging disease of dry beans that can cause significant levels of seed discoloration and large reductions in yield. The disease is readily transmitted from infected seed to seedlings, which will result in fieldwide epidemics that can spread to nearby fields when the environment is favorable for infection and spread. Because infected seed is not always discolored, the use of certified disease-free seed is critical for management of anthracnose. Further, the disease is difficult to control with foliar fungicides and seed treatments, and the pathogen can develop new races that overcome genetic resistance, making prevention the best disease management strategy.
Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew - PP967
Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.
Safflower Production - A870
Safflower provides three principal products: oil, meal and birdseed. Safflower oil consists of two types: those high in monounsaturated fatty acid (oleic) and those high in polyunsaturated fatty acid (linoleic). This publication provides background information on how to grow safflower in ND, from land selection, fertilizer management, variety selection, seeding, weed management to harvesting and marketing the crop. Safflower is an annual oilseed crop adapted primarily to the central grain areas of the western Great Plains.
Flax Production in North Dakota - A1038
Flax production goes back to ancient history. Producers grow two types of flax: seed flax for the oil in its seed and fiber flax for the fiber in its stem. North Dakota is the leading producer of flax for oil and food use in the United States. Flax is an annual plant that has one main stem. Flax is a self-pollinated crop; usually is sown on the same type of land that grows wheat and barley.
North Dakota Durum Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A1067
Durum was planted on 1.4 million acres in North Dakota in 2012, up from the 750,000 acres planted in 2011. Average yield is estimated at 32 bushels per acre (bu/a), up significantly from the yield of 25.5 bu/a recorded last year. The most commonly grown varieties in 2012 and the percent of the acreage they occupied were Divide (30.4), Alkabo (14.7), Mountrail (13.3), Lebsock (10.3), Grenora (10.2), Pierce (3.4) and Tioga (2.9).
Documentation for Suspected Herbicide Drift Damage - WC751
Herbicide drift to nontarget plants can cause damage suffi cient to result in a signifi cant monetary loss. Documentation of chemical damage is required if compensation for loss will be pursued. In addition, establish the source of drift and amount of loss caused by the damage.
Leafy Spurge Identification and Chemical Control - W765
Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is a widely established perennial weed in North Dakota, infesting approximately 990,000 acres of land in 2005 (North Dakota Department of Agriculture survey). The leafy spurge infestation in North Dakota seems to have peaked at about 1.5 million acres in 2000 and 2001. The decline thereafter has been a result of an effective control program initiated in the early 1980s. Prior to this control program, leafy spurge acreage doubled every 10 years from 1950 to 1985. Despite the decline in acreage, the widespread infestation continues to cost the state more than $75 million annually in lost production.
North Dakota Canola Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A1124
Canola is a major oil crop in the northern Great Plains, particularly in North Dakota. In 2016, North Dakota accounted for approximately 82 percent of the canola acreage planted in the U.S. This publication summarizes canola variety performance at the various North Dakota State University Research Extension Centers. The relative performance of the hybrids is presented in table form.
Identification and Control of Invasive and Troublesome Weeds in North Dakota - W1411
Th is publication is intended to help land managers properly identify and control noxious and invasive weeds found in the state. Th e current list of 11 noxious weeds are included, as well as species listed by various counties as noxious. Other species included are either invasive weeds found in bordering states with the potential to move into North Dakota or are commonly misidentifi ed native species that do not require control eff orts, such as the native thistles.
Field Pea Production - A1166
The North Dakota Field Pea Production guide is intended to provide growers field pea production information including variety selection principles, field selection, seeding rate, seed treatments, inoculation, fertilization, weed control, diseases, insect pests, harvest and storage and markets.
Biology and Management of Biennial Wormwood - W1322
Biennial wormwood is an aggressive and prolific seed-producing plant that has become a problem mainly in soybean and dry edible bean production areas of Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota. Biennial wormwood, as its name infers, was primarily biennial when the species fi rst was classified, but weedy cropland biotypes of biennial wormwood are annual plants. Many factors, such as season-long emergence, prevalence in moist environments, adaptation to all tillage systems, tolerance to commonly used soil-applied and postemergence herbicides, and misidentification of biennial wormwood as common ragweed, contribute to increased biennial wormwood infestations. Some herbicides used to control common ragweed do not control biennial wormwood.
North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat - A1196
During the 2011-12 growing season, 750,000 acres were planted to winter wheat, with 700,000 acres harvested. This is the largest area of winter wheat ever planted and harvested in North Dakota. The state’s winter wheat yield is estimated at 55 bushels per acre (bu/a), which ties the record yield obtained in 2010. Due to a mild winter, winter survival of the crop was excellent. Furthermore, due to relatively dry conditions, little disease pressure occurred this year. Stripe rust was problematic in a few areas on susceptible varieties.
Fertilizing Malting and Feed Barley - SF723
Barley has been an important cash and rotational crop in North Dakota and the region for many years. It is important as a feed grain, but by far its economic value is linked to the malting industry. Barley requires adequate nitrogen (N) for good yields, but since grain protein in excess of industry limits often results in rejection of a crop, and since excess N leads to smaller kernel size, the line between adequate N and excessive N is fine. In addition, excessive N may result in lodging, which lowers yields and increases the incidence and severity of head blight and other diseases in some years.
North Dakota Fertilizer Recommendation Tables and Equations - SF882
The soil test recommendation tables here are based on field research data obtained in North Dakota, South Dakota, western Minnesota and the Canadian Prairie Provinces.
Diamondback Moth in Canola - E1346
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of diamondback moth including identification, life cycle, crop damage, pheromone trapping, field scouting, economic threshold, cultural methods, biological control and chemical control.
Hard White Wheat - A1310
This publication provides background information about growing hard white wheat, the challenges of its production and the current recommendations for growing it in North Dakota.
Fertilizing Winter Rye - SF1462
Rye previously was grouped with wheat in fertility recommendations, but rye has unique nutrient requirements that separate it from other grains. Nitrogen requirements are not as high, even though yield may be comparable to wheat. Because economic return for rye is not as high as for wheat, other nutrient recommendations are more modest. A significant amount of rye is grown organically, so suggestions for fertilizing in an organic system also are included.
Options for Land Application of Solid Manure - NM1613
Based on the type of livestock facility, manure can be handled and stored as a liquid (less than 5 percent dry matter), slurry (5 to 10 percent dry matter) and/or solid (greater than 15 percent dry matter). Figure 1 shows the relative consistency of the various types of manure that common animal species excrete. Depending on manure consistency, manure application equipment and application methods differ significantly.
Evaluation of Soils for Suitability for Tile Drainage Performance - SF1617
The presence of salts and high water tables in North Dakota soils due to an extended climactic wet cycle recently has stimulated interest in the installation of tile drainage systems. The tile controls the water table and encourages the leaching and removal of salts from the soil above the tile lines. This improves soil productivity, culminating in improved crop yields.
Blister Beetles - E1002
Blister beetles are infrequent pests of several crops including alfalfa, sweet clover, potatoes, beans, and sugar beets. They are also injurious to a wide variety of vegetables and many flowers and other ornamentals. They normally cause limited plant damage. However, when they are ingested by horses or other livestock, serious illness or even death may result.brief summary
Selecting a Sprinkler Irrigation System - AE91
The four basic methods of irrigation are: subsurface irrigation (“subirrigation,” which uses tile drain lines), surface or gravity irrigation, trickle irrigation (also called drip irrigation) and sprinkler irrigation. Of the acres currently irrigated in North Dakota, more than 80 percent use some type of sprinkler system. Statewide, the center pivot is the most popular sprinkler system.
Tame Mustard Production - A935
The Tame Mustard Production publication provides producers with data on mustard variety yield performance throughout the state and gives information about other characteristics needed for accurate selection of mustard varieties. It also provides production information for North Dakota growers
Canola Production - A686
Canola has become a popular oilseed crop for North Dakota. The state leads the U.S. in canola production, with approximately 92 percent of domestic production. Canola is a specific edible type of rapeseed, developed in the 1970s, which contains about 40 percent oil. The term “canola” is a name registered by the Western Canadian Oilseed Crushers Association.
Fertilizing Canola and Mustard - SF1122
Canola is an important crop in North Dakota. It is grown for its oil content for both food and fuel purposes. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) requirements of canola and mustard are similar to those of small grains. Sulfur (S) requirements for canola are higher than most crops. Soil test results direct fertilizer rates for N, P, K and S. Soil cores should be taken from 0 to 24 inches deep and divided into 0- to 6-inch and 6- to 24-inch samples. P and K should be analyzed on the 0- to 6-inch sample, while N and S should be tested on each depth.
Canola Production Field Guide - A1280
Canola is a specific edible type of rapeseed, developed in the 1970s, which contains about 40 percent oil. The term “canola” is a registered name by the Western Canadian Oilseed Crushers Association. Canola varieties must have an erucic acid content of less than 2 percent and less than 30 micromoles of glucosinolates per gram of seed. This makes it acceptable as an edible oil and animal protein feed. Canola oil is considered one of the highest quality edible oils available. Canadian and U.S. farmers mostly grow low-erucic acid and low-glucosinolate varieties. High-erucic acid oil rapeseed is grown and used for industrial lubricants. This type of rapeseed mostly is grown in Europe, although some production occurs in Canada and the U.S.
Anhydrous Ammonia: Managing the Risks - AE1149
More anhydrous ammonia is used as fertilizer in North Dakota than any other nitrogen fertilizer source. Anhydrous ammonia is classified as a hazardous substance. Most accidents with anhydrous ammonia are due to uncontrolled releases. Few problems occur when the ammonia is being handled and applied as intended. Most uncontrolled releases are due to improper procedures, careless or untrained workers, or faulty equipment. Protective equipment is required by law to be available where anhydrous ammonia is handled or applied. Wearing protective equipment greatly reduces the chance of injury from an ammonia release. Countless tons of anhydrous ammonia are applied every crop year without problems; safe procedures and good-quality equipment do work.
Fertilizing Hard Red Spring Wheat and Durum - SF712
Nitrogen management is a key to successful wheat production. Recommendations include consideration of wheat yield and protein response to added N within three major state agri-climatology zones, and the use of wheat price and N cost in determining N rate. These recommendations are based on the concept that identifies an optimal N rate for greatest net income, not greatest yield.
Managing Saline Soils in North Dakota - SF1087
Saline soils have salt levels high enough that either crop yields begin to suffer or cropping is impractical. Excessive salts injure plants by disrupting the uptake of water into roots and interfering with the uptake of competitive nutrients. Several factors contribute to the development of saline soils in North Dakota, but a high water table is a prime requirement. Recognizing how and why salts accumulate is the first step in farming profitably on land interspersed with saline soils. Preventing further encroachment of salinity and addressing remediation strategies are other steps.
Developing Zone Soil Sampling Maps - SF1176-2
In the northern Great Plains region, most soil sampling is conducted to determine the residual soil nitrate (N) available following a previous crop that can be used to reduce the N fertilizer required for the next crop. Zone soil sampling has been very effective in revealing residual nitrate patterns and amounts in fi elds. To develop zone boundaries to direct soil sampling, a number of tools can be used. A regional project in North Dakota, Montana and Minnesota concluded that all the tools detailed here can be used to develop zones.
Yield Mapping and Use of Yield Map Data - SF1176-3
Combine yield monitors are growing in popularity. Data are utilized to build fi eld yield maps in certain years or yield frequency maps during multiple years. Maps serve as location-year record of management and may be predictive of yield potential and soil nutrient variability for future crop management decisions.
Fertilizing Winter Wheat - SF1448
Winter wheat fertilization recommendations in North Dakota previously were similar to spring wheat and durum. As a larger research base was developed for spring wheat and durum, separating the winter wheat from other wheats became necessary due to their unique nutrient requirements.
North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A1196
This publication provides information and performance data on the most recently released hard winter wheat varieties tested in North Dakota. Data from multiple locations in North Dakota are complied and summarized.
North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A1196
During the 2014-15 growing season, 250,000 acres of winter wheat were planted and 235,000 acres were harvested. The state’s winter wheat yield this season was estimated at 51 bushels per acre (bu/a), which is up significantly from last year’s yield of 44 bu/a. Generally, conditions were favorable for winter wheat development and yield. Yellow rust developed at damaging levels in some areas of the state . Fusarium head blight (scab) was problematic in a few regions of the state, but generally the crop was of a better quality than last year, when scab was more widespread. This publication will aid producers with variety selection.
North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A1196
During the 2015-16 growing season, 140,000 acres of winter wheat were planted and 130,000 acres were harvested. The state’s winter wheat yield this season was estimated at 54 bushels per acre (bu/a), which is up significantly from last year’s yield of 51 bu/a. Generally, conditions were favorable for winter wheat development and yield. Diseases were not as damaging as in past years in most regions of the state.
North Dakota Durum Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A1067-15
This publication contains the results from multiple locations of the performance adapted varieties of durum.
North Dakota Durum Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A1067-14
This publication provides data on the performance of durum wheat varieties from trials conducted throughout ND. It is intended to be a resource to be used by farmers in selecting varieties that can perform well in their own farms.
North Dakota Hard Red Spring Wheat Variety Trial for 2014 and Selection Guide - A574-2014
this publication provides data on the performance of hard red spring wheat varieties from trials conducted throughout ND. It is intended to be a resource to be used by farmers in selecting varieties that can perform well in their own farms.
North Dakota Hard Red Spring Wheat and Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A574-15
This publication summarizes data from variety trials conducted in the main research centers in North Dakota.
North Dakota Hard Red Spring Wheat and Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A574-2012
Hard red spring (HRS) wheat was planted on 5.75 million acres in 2012, up from 5.65 million acres in 2011. The average yield of spring wheat was 45 bushels/acre (bu/a), up significantly from the yield of 31.5 bu/a recorded last year.
North Dakota Barley, Oat and Rye Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A1049-2012
Successful production of these crops depends on numerous factors, including selecting the right variety for a particular area. Characteristics to evaluate in selecting a variety are: yield potential in your area, test weight, straw strength, plant height, reaction to problematic diseases and maturity. Selecting varieties with good quality also is important to maintain market recognition.
North Dakota Barley, Oat and Rye Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A1049-15
This publication contains the results from multiple locations on the performance of adapted varieties of barley, oat and rye.
North Dakota Barley, Oat,Rye and Flax Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A1049-2014
This publication contains the results from variety trials conducted in several locations in ND focused on barley, oat and rye. Data may be useful to growers in selecting varieties that will be the most productive in their particular farm.
North Dakota Canola Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A1124-12
Canola is a major oil crop in the northern Great Plains, particularly in North Dakota. In 2012, North Dakota accounted for approximately 83 percent of the canola acreage harvested in the United States. This publication summarizes canola variety performance at the various North Dakota State University Research Extension Centers.
2015 Canola Variety Trials - A1124-15
The North Dakota Canola Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on canola performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection on canola hybrids for agricultural projection in North Dakota
ND Canola Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A1124-14
The North Dakota Canola Variety Trail Results provide producers with data on canola performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of canola hybrids for agricultural production in North Dakota.
North Dakota Canola Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide -A1124-13
Canola is a major oil crop in the northern Great Plains, particularly in North Dakota. In 2013, North Dakota accounted for approximately 67 percent of the canola acreage planted in the U.S. This publication summarizes canola variety performance at the various North Dakota State University Research Extension Centers. The relative performance of the varieties and hybrids is presented in table form. Give special attention to yield results of those trials nearest to your production area when evaluating varieties or hybrids in these trials.
IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863
Integrated pest management (IPM) is an integral part of North Dakota’s agriculture. IPM is a program to manage pests that combines a number of strategies to reduce pest risks while protecting the environment, wildlife and people. The goal of IPM in agriculture is to produce safe, abundant and affordable food, feed and fiber. The target pests generally are weeds, insects, and disease-causing organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes.
North Dakota Dry Pea Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A1469-2012
Field pea fits well into small-grain rotations. The green- and yellow-seeded varieties are used for human consumption as dry split peas. Field peas also are used as protein concentrates for livestock and pigeon feeds. In North Dakota, pea yields are similar to hard red spring wheat yields
North Dakota Dry Pea Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A1469-14
Dry pea (Pisum sativum L.), native to southwest Asia, was among the first crops brought under cultivation by man. The largest acreages of dry pea in the United States are in North Dakota, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. As a cool-season legume crop, it fits well into small-grain rotations. The green- and yellow-seeded varieties are used for human consumption. Dry peas also are used as protein concentrates for livestock and pigeon feeds. In North Dakota, pea yields generally are similar to or exceed spring wheat yield. Peas also can be used as a forage crop for hay, pasture or silage.
North Dakota Dry Pea Performance Testing 2015 - A1469-15
The North Dakota Pea Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on Field Pea performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of Dry Pea Varieties for agricultural production in ND.
North Dakota Soybean Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A843-2012
Soybean variety selection should be based on maturity, yield, seed quality, lodging, iron-deficiency chlorosis tolerance and disease reaction. Later-maturing varieties tend to yield more than early maturing varieties when evaluated at the same location. After determining a suitable maturity for the farm, comparing yields of varieties that are of similar maturity is important. Although late maturity increases yield potential, later-maturing cultivars are more risky to grow than earlier-maturing varieties because an early fall frost may kill a late-maturing variety before the beans have completely filled in the pods, which will reduce yield greatly.
North Dakota Soybean Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A843
The ND Soybean Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on soybean performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of soybean varieties for agricultural production in ND.
North Dakota Soybean Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A843
Soybean variety selection should be based on maturity, yield, seed quality, lodging, iron-deficiency chlorosis tolerance and disease reaction. Later-maturing varieties tend to yield more than early maturing varieties when evaluated at the same location. After determining a suitable maturity for the farm, comparing yields of varieties that are of similar maturity is important. Although late maturity increases yield potential, later-maturing cultivars are more risky to grow than earlier-maturing varieties because an early fall frost may kill a late-maturing variety before the beans have completely filled in the pods, which will reduce yield greatly.
North Dakota Soybean Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A843
Soybean variety selection should be based on maturity, yield, seed quality, lodging, iron deficiency chlorosis tolerance and disease reaction. Later-maturing varieties tend to yield more than early maturing varieties when evaluated at the same location. After determining a suitable maturity for the farm, comparing yields of varieties that are of similar maturity is important. Although later maturity increases yield potential, later- maturing cultivars are more risky to grow than earlier-maturing varieties because an early fall frost may kill a late-maturing variety before the beans have filled the pods, which will reduce yield greatly.
North Dakota and South Dakota Sunflower Hybrid Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A652
In North Dakota, an estimated 840,000 acres of sunflowers were harvested in 2012. This was an increase of 279,000 acres, compared with 2011. Table 1 contains acreage data for the past 13 years as reported by the North Dakota Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
North Dakota and South Dakota Sunflower Hybrid Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A652
The North Dakota and South Dakota Trial Results provide producers with data related to the hybrid performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of sunflower hybrids for agricultural production in North Dakota.
North Dakota and South Dakota Sunflower Hybrid Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A652-14
In North Dakota, an estimated 655,000 acres of sunflowers were harvested in 2014. This was about 35 percent more than the acres harvested in 2013.
North Dakota and South Dakota Sunflower Hybrid Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A652
The North Dakota and South Dakota Sunflower Hybrid Trial Results provide producers with data on sunflower hybrid performance throughout ND and SD and gives information about yield and oil content and other traits needed for accurate selection of sunflower hybrids for agricultural production in ND.
North Dakota Dry Bean Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A654
Dry edible beans have been a significant crop in eastern and east-central North Dakota during the past decade.
North Dakota Dry Bean Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A654
The ND Dry Bean Variety Trial Results provide producers with data or bean performance throughout the state gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of Dry Bean Varieties for agricultural production in ND.
North Dakota Dry Bean Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A654
Dry edible beans have become a significant crop in eastern and east-central North Dakota during the past decade. Acreage for the past 15 years is shown in Table 1, with production by classes in Table 2. The 610,000 dry bean acres planted in 2009 reflect a decrease of 50,000 acres compared with 2008.
North Dakota Dry Bean Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A654
The agronomic data presented in this publication are from replicated research plots using experimental designs that enable the use of statistical analysis. The LSD (least significant difference) numbers beneath the columns in tables are derived from the statistical analyses and only apply to the numbers in the column in which they appear. If the difference between two varieties exceeds the LSD value, it means that with 90 (0.10 level) percent probability, the higher-yielding variety has a significant yield advantage. If the difference between two varieties is less than the LSD value, then the variety yields are considered similar. The abbreviation NS is used to indicate no significant difference for that trait among any of the varieties. The CV is a measure of variability in the trial. The CV stands for coefficient of variation and is expressed as a percentage. Large CVs mean a large amount of variation that could not be attributed to differences in the varieties.
Integrated Pest Management of Japanese Beetle in North Dakota - E1631
The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman, belongs to the insect family Scarabaeidae. It is a highly destructive plant pest that feeds on more than 300 host plants, including field crops (especially corn and soybeans), ornamental trees and shrubs, garden flowers and vegetables, and turf (lawns, pastures and golf courses). Some of the preferred host plants of adult beetles found in North Dakota are rose, apple, black cherry, cherry, flowering crabapple, plum, grapes, hollyhock, blackberry, raspberry, linden, elm and buckeye. Grubs are found primarily in the root zones of grasses.
Absinth Wormwood Control - W838
Absinth wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.) is a perennial forb which is easily recognized by its strong sage odor. The plant also is known as American or common wormwood, mugwort or madderwort, and wormwood sage. It is grown in herb gardens for the sage flavor of the leaves. The young flower heads are the source of aromatic oil used to prepare vermouth and absinth.
Temporary Grain Storage - AE84
The purpose of any grain storage facility is to prevent grain quality loss from weather, wind and moisture; rodents, birds and insects, and microorganisms. Various techniques and facilities have been used to store grain temporarily. Generally, the more durable the facility, the longer grain can be stored without excess loss.
North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A793-12
This publication reports the results of corn hybrid trials that were conducted by NDSU research and Extension personnel throughout North Dakota. The hybrids tested were entered voluntarily by the companies that market them, and the management of these trials was financed partially by the entry fee those companies paid.
North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2015 - A793
This publication reports the results from the various corn hybrid trials conducted in ND during the 2015 growing season. Summary tables for each experimental location contain the yield and moisture at harvest of the hybrids tested.
North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2013 - A793
This publication reports the results of corn hybrid trials that were conducted by NDSU research and Extension personnel throughout North Dakota. The hybrids tested were entered voluntarily by the companies that market them, and the management of these trials was financed partially by the entry fee those companies paid. Links to the participating companies are summarized in Table 1. Additional information and data for a given location may be available at www.ag.ndsu.edu/varietytrials/corn. When selecting a hybrid, look at its performance at multiple locations and/or across years if possible.
Corn Drying and Storage - AE1119
Corn producers have some control over corn quality through variety selection, timing and care used in harvesting, selection and operation of dryers and conveyors, and storage management.
Grain Stream Sampling and Sampler Construction - AE1044
Accurate grain sampling is equally important to both the producer and the buyer of grain. A grain sample is important because information from the sample is used to establish the quality characteristics and the value of the grain. Therefore, it is important that proper thought and attention be given to the method of collection, sample size, and frequency of sample collection per unit volume of grain.
Caught in the Grain! - AE1102
People can become caught or trapped in grain in three different ways: the collapse of bridged grain, the collapse of a vertical wall of grain, and entrapment in flowing grain. Moving or flowing grain is involved in all three. People who work with grain – loading it, unloading it, and moving it from bin to bin – need to know about the hazards of flowing grain and how to prevent a grain entrapment situation.
Emerald Ash Borer Biology and Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota - E1634
This publication summarizes the threat of invasive metallic wood-boring beetle, emerald ash borer, to ND's ash trees. It's identification, biology, damage and pest management strategies including cultural, plant resistance, biological control and chemical control are discussed. If you suspect that your ash tree is infested with emerald ash borer, it also tells you what to do.
Growing Lentil in North Dakota - A1636
An overview of lentil production for specialty crop producers, including weed control, diseases, harvesting and references. Lentil production in North Dakota primarily has been confined to the western part of the state because disease is an issue under higher moisture conditions. Lentil is an excellent rotational crop. Production of lentil or other legumes in a diverse cropping system may improve soil health, and provides for an opportunity to control problem weeds such as downy brome.
North Dakota Alternative Crop Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A1105
This publication contains information on selected varieties of flax, safflower, lentil and chickpea that North Dakota State University tested in 2015.
North Dakota Alternative Crop Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A1105-14
This publication contains information on selected varieties of flax, safflower, lentil and chickpea that North Dakota State University tested in 2014.
2013 North Dakota Alternative Crop Variety Performance - A1105
This publication contains information on selected varieties of flax, safflower, lentil and chickpea that North Dakota State University tested in 2013.
Compatibility of North Dakota Soils for Irrigation - AE1637
This publication is intended as a first step to help current and prospective irrigators understand the principles behind the irrigability of soils in North Dakota. This publication should be used in combination with soil survey information of the land to be irrigated. Soil surveys of every county in North Dakota have been completed and documented.
2012 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticde Use in Minnesota and North Dakota - E1640
The 2012 dry bean grower survey is the 23rd annual assessment of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
North Dakota Crop Insect Management Guide - E1143
This guide summarizes the insecticides/miticides registered in North Dakota for control of insect or mite pests of filed crops. Scouting and economic thresholds are listed for the major pest. Keeping in mind that chemical control is only part of an Integrated Pest Management approach. The most effective control may involve integrating culture, host plant resistance and other strategies.
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