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Nutrition & Wellness

Activities to Promote Health

Activities to Promote Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits Among Children - FN692

These activities provide a way for teachers and volunteer educators to reinforce nutrition and fitness concepts for children in classrooms, after-school programs or club settings –and have fun, too! Most of the activities in this publication require little time, preparation or equipment. Most can be modifi ed to fi t the knowledge and skills of a variety of age groups.

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Exercise Your Brain

Exercise Your Brain - FN1431

Physical activity helps maintain good blood flow to the brain. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that most adults get 30 minutes of moderate activity most days, preferably every day. Short segments of physical activity (such as three 10-minute walks) count toward the goal. Stimulate your brain by adding variety to your activities. Try a new activity, alternate activities throughout the week or take a new route when you walk or jog. Routine activities don’t challenge your brain, so mix it up a little.

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Fellowship Food

Fellowship Food: Nourishing the Body and the Soul - FN1449

Help people stay healthy by providing nourishing options. Many people shortchange themselves on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Eating a diet rich in these foods can promote good health by helping reduce our risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases. If you are bringing a dish to a potluck, consider providing the veggies, fruits or whole grains. Bring a large nutrient-rich salad with a variety of greens and sprinkle with dried fruit and nuts or seeds. Bring whole-grain bread or crackers.

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Putting a Healthy Spin on Prepackaged Favorites

Cooking 101 Week 6 Putting a Healthy Spin on Prepackaged Favorites- FN1561

Many people do not have a lot of time to devote to meal preparation. While many convenience foods are available, some are high in sodium or fat. You can make these foods more nutritious without doing a lot of work

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Healthy Eating on the Run

Healthy Eating on the Run - FN1474

Imagine you are planning your grocery list. You know you have limited time to prepare meals and snacks each day. Many people struggle to make healthful food choices with today´s busy schedules.

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Have a Healthy Heart

Have a Healthy Heart - FN589

On average, your heart beats about 100,000 times per day, pumping nutrients and oxygen throughout the body. Taking this hard-working group of muscles for granted can be easy. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. The purpose of this publication is to increase awareness of heart disease risk factors for women and ways for everyone to improve heart health through lifestyle choices. Having regular checkups and discussing any health-related issues with your physician or health-care provider is important.

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Add Fiber to Your Diet

Add Fiber to Your Diet - FN1459

Having more fiber in your diet helps lower blood cholesterol and prevents constipation, and ma help prevent cancer. Many people shortchange themselves on the 20 to 35 grams per day fiber recommendation. The average American consumes 10 to 15 grams of fiber per day.

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Bone Up on Calcium

Eat Smart: Bone Up on Calcium - FN1434

Children ages 9 to 13 need 1,300 milligrams of calcium a day to keep their bones and teeth strong. Children ages 4 to 8 need 800 milligrams of calcium per day. They also need vitamin D, which helps the body use the calcium. Milk is fortifi ed with vitamin D. Many foods contain calcium. The best sources are milk, yogurt and cheese. Fish, soy products and nuts also are good sources of calcium. Some fruit juices, cereals, breads, snacks and other foods have added calcium.

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Enjoy Breakfast Every Day!

Eat Smart: Enjoy Breakfast Every Day - FN1433

Eating breakfast fuels the body with needed nutrients, provides energy for an active day, gets you ready to learn and helps you keep a healthy body.

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Now Serving: Beans!

Now Serving Beans! - FN1485

If you’re looking for a way to stretch your budget and improve your family’s nutrition, look no further. Consider adding more beans to your menu. They’re convenient, versatile and lend themselves to many tasty dishes. Beans are a rich source of protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Replace some of the fat in baked goods such as brownies with mashed black beans. Beans can be added to casseroles or soups to add flavor, texture and more nutrients.

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Serve More Vegetables

Vary Your Veggies: Serve More Vegetables - FN1455

Most adults and children need 2 to 3 cups of vegetables per day, but the amount varies depending on age, gender and amount of physical activity.

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Add Vegetables to Your Diet

Vary Your Veggies: Add Some Vegetables to your Diet - FN1454

Keep washed, ready-to-eat vegetables on hand and easy to find. How many times does someone in your family open the refrigerator door to see what there is to eat and take one of the first foods he or she sees? So let the cleaned vegetables be seen first. Also, set them out when meals and snacks are eaten. On the run? Cut up some veggies and put them in zip-top bags. Stop in the produce department to see if some vegetables are cut up and ready to eat for a snack. If you do not have a cooler or refrigerator nearby, remember to eat cut-up produce within two hours for safety.

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Eat Smart: Become a Pro With Protein

Eat Smart: Become a Pro With Protein - FN1681

The amount of food from the Protein Foods Group you need to eat depends on your age, whether you are a boy or girl and the amount of physical activity you get. Most people eat enough food from this group.

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Nourish Your Digestive System

Nourish Your Digestive System - FN1606

Our large intestine (colon) is home to 100 trillion “friendly” bacteria. These bacteria help defend us against disease, make certain vitamins such as vitamin K, and help break down extra food residue that remains after digestion in the small intestine. This process is known as fermentation. Our bacteria can become imbalanced due to stress, diarrhea, changes in diet and antibiotics. Consuming fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, probiotics and prebiotics can help our bacteria stay within a healthy balance.

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Rate Your Fiber Fitness FN-1458

Rate Your Fiber Fitness - FN1458

Fiber isn’t a “miracle food,”but adding fiber-rich foods to your diet can have health benefits. The National Cancer Institute suggests that foods high in fiber may be protective against some cancers, particularly colon cancer. Although the National Cancer Institute recommends getting 20 to 35 grams of fiber per day. Soluble fiber (found in oats, dry edible beans, barley and fruits) helps lower blood cholesterol and may reduce the risk of heart disease. Insoluble fiber (found in wheat bran, whole-wheat products and vegetables) helps prevent ulcers, constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis. High fiber foods usually are low in calories and many are inexpensive, too.

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Steps to Healthy, Economical Meals

Steps to Healthy, Economic Meals - FN1595

We chose the recipes in this cookbook because they are tasty, nutritious, economical and easy to prepare. We hope some become your family favorites!

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