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Food Safety

Pickle Buckets Can Cause Foodborne Illness!

Using five-gallon pickle buckets and other types of large deep containers for cooling hot foods should be avoided at all costs. While convenient for storage, these containers are much too large to be used for cooling food safely. Food may be stored in these buckets only after it has been properly cooled to refrigeration temperatures.

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Questions and Answers About Storing Food in the Refrigerator

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.

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Questions and Answers About Storing Food in the Freezer

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.

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Questions and Answers About Storing Canned and Packaged Food

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods

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Questions and Answers About Using a Pressure Canner

Pressure canning is recommended for low-acid foods. Low acid foods are not acidic enough to prevent the growth of bacteria and should be processed at temperatures of 240 degrees to 250 degrees, which is attainable with pressure canners. Low-acid foods include; red meats, seafood, poultry, milk, all fresh vegetables except for most tomatoes.

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Questions and Answers About Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods

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Quick Facts: Becoming the Grill Master

When done right, grilling can be one of the more healthful ways to prepare food. Preparing meats and poultry on the grill allows excess fat to drip away. Very little fat needs to be added to foods cooked on the grill.

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Safe and Healthy Eating During Pregnancy

During pregnancy, women are more vulnerable to food-borne illness because of hormone changes that lower immunity. Fortunately, most cases of food-borne illness can be prevented by following the guidelines provided in this publication.

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Safe Food for Babies and Children: Warming Bottles Safely

For the first year of a baby's life, breast milk or infant formula should be used to provide the nutrition necessary to promote growth and general health. Pre-mixed infant formula and expressed breast milk do not need to be heated prior to feeding. However, many babies prefer warm bottles because of the similarity to warm milk fed from the breast.

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Safe Food for Babies and Children: Choking Dangers

Every child is at risk of choking: Older infants and children less than 5 years old easily can choke on food, toys and household objects. A single choking incident may result in death, permanent brain damage due to lack of oxygen and other complications associated with airway blockage. This publication provides tips on choking prevention.

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Safe Food for Babies and Children: A Guide for Babysitters - Parent Edition

As a parent, you most likely will need a babysitter to look after your children at some time. Infants and young children are especially vulnerable to foodborne illness, and even a small error in food preparation can cause severe illness. Making sure your babysitter is prepared to provide care safely will assure a positive experience for both you and your sitter.

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Safe Food for Babies and Children: Heating Solid Food Safely

Whether warming bottles or solid foods, it is ALWAYS important to use safe heating practices to keep your baby happy and healthy. Although you may be an expert at feeding your little one, remember that babysitters and family members may not know how to heat bottles and food correctly. Leaving complete instructions in a handy location, such as on the refrigerator door, may help you and the caregiver feel comfortable and relaxed come feeding time.

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Seniors and Food Safety: Why are Seniors at Risk for Foodborne Illness?

James L. Smith, a microbiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wanted to find the answer to the question of why seniors are more at risk for foodborne illness. He reviewed data from foodborne outbreaks at nursing homes, and compared the immune and digestive systems of seniors and younger individuals, as well as evaluating the overall physical well-being of seniors.

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Wash your hands!

No matter the language, hand washing is an important step in the fight against germs. Follow these guidelines for proper hand-washing practices.

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Wild Side of the Menu No. 1 Care and Cookery

The most succulent wild game can be destroyed by improper handling in the field or improper cooking at home. The handling of the meat from harvesting to preparing can make a major difference in flavor and safety of the end product. The purpose of this publication is to provide information on proper care and cookery of wild game so you can fully enjoy the fruits of the field.

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Wild Side of the Menu No. 2: Field to Freezer

Each year, hunting of animals and birds is increasingly popular, but often the game is wasted because of improper handling in the field. Nutritionally, game meats rate as well as domestic animals and may prove to be a healthier source of nutrition. Wild game that is properly treated in the field and correctly cooked to enhance its distinctive flavors holds a special place for many gourmets. The purpose of this publication is to describe how to properly handle your game from harvesting through processing.

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