Publications

Accessibility


Food Preparation & Recipes

Coffee Time! Exploring a Favorite Beverage (FN1894)

Coffee originated in the coffee forests of Ethiopia and has grown in popularity across the world, especially with today’s hustle-and-bustle culture. Unfortunately, numerous health controversies, concerns and warnings accompany this increasingly popular beverage. With so much confusion surrounding this energizing drink, determining fact from fiction sometimes is difficult.

Read More…

(Week 9) Cooking 101 Quick and Easy Menus, Recipes and Tips for Singles and Couples:Exploring Vegetarian Meals (FN1897)

Eating a balanced diet doesn’t have to be a challenge for those who choose to follow a vegetarian diet. Using a variety of protein sources can add zest to dishes while keeping them healthful and hearty.

Read More…

Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Making Your Own Pizza (FN1890)

Pizza sometimes is viewed as unhealthy or even as “junk food,” but well-chosen toppings make pizza a healthful menu option that can include all of the food groups (grain, vegetables, protein, fruit and dairy or alternative). Pizza can vary greatly in the number of calories per slice, depending on the toppings chosen and type of crust, so check the nutrition information on the ingredients you choose.

Read More…

Give the Gift of Joy With a Quick Bread Mix (FN1888)

The act of gift giving originated centuries ago and continues today. Gift giving has become a common part of peoples’ everyday lives — from commemorating special occasions to expressing gratitude. Several cultures practice the thoughtful gesture, and it brings people from different backgrounds together.

Read More…

Pinchin' Pennie$ in the Kitchen: 7 Steps to Making a Salad in a Jar (FN1886)

Making an easy, on-the-go meal never has been simpler. Tap into your creative side and make your own salad in a jar recipe. Invite kids to help prepare them. Add the salad dressing of your choice and layers of tasty ingredients, and shake together when ready to eat.

Read More…

Now Serving: Nutritious Snacks for Preschoolers - FN1380

A child’s small tummy usually cannot hold enough at meals to keep him or her satisfied until the next meal. Kids younger than 6 may need to eat two to three snacks a day because they usually can’t meet their daily requirements in just three meals. Think of snacks as minimeals to help fill the gaps in their diets. Children should be getting the majority of their calories from a variety of grains (preferably whole grains), vegetables, fruits, milk products and lean protein sources.

Read More…

Now Serving: Well-Measured Recipes - FN707

Family meals promote family togetherness. Family meals provide a time to share what is going on in each other’s lives and enjoy a nutritious meal. Families who eat together are more likely to have more balanced meals. Preparing the meal is an important part of mealtime. Have children help in every aspect of the preparation, from choosing the menu to setting the table to making the meal. Including children in the preparation can lead to lifelong knowledge and memories.

Read More…

Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 5: Time-saving Tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1387

In today's busy world, cooking a meal completely from scratch may be difficult. However, convenience foods usually cost more and may be higher in calories, fat and sodium. This is the fifth in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes time-money-saving tips and sample menus with recipes that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes.

Read More…

Now Serving: More Whole Grains - FN695

Children who eat more often with their families eat a healthier diet, including more grains, fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods. Grain foods, such as pasta, bread and rice, provide energy, vitamins and minerals. USDA’s MyPlate recommends that we make at least half our grains whole. The recommendations for grain foods are in “ounce equivalents.” Enjoy 3 or more ounce equivalents of whole-grain foods every day.

Read More…

Now Serving: Nutritious After School Snacks - FN1379

Providing nutritious snacks doesn’t have to be expensive but you may need to do some planning to make them readily available for your child. Getting kids to eat fruits and vegetables can be difficult. Make snack time fun. For example, provide a variety of cut-up fruits and vegetables and let your kids create their own kabobs. You also may want to try serving vegetables with low-fat dip to make them more appealing.

Read More…

Now Serving: Meals with Help from Teens - FN706

More children and teenagers are eating meals and snacks away from their home and family. Encouraging teens to help prepare food and clean up can help busy families manage their time. Teens learn important cooking skills and have fun, too. Cooking promotes creativity and helps teens form good eating behaviors that will last a lifetime.

Read More…

Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 4: Planned-over Food tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1386

Planning menus, shopping for foods and using your leftovers wisely can pay off in many ways. Your family can enjoy healthy meals with lots of variety, and you can stretch your budget. This is the fourth in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store. It includes sample menus and recipes that you can adapt to meet your family's tastes. It also includes creative ways to make use of your leftovers, which become "planned-overs".

Read More…

Now Serving: Beans! - FN1485

If you’re looking for a way to stretch your budget and improve your family’s nutrition, look no further. Consider adding more beans to your menu. They’re convenient, versatile and lend themselves to many tasty dishes. Beans are a rich source of protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Replace some of the fat in baked goods such as brownies with mashed black beans. Beans can be added to casseroles or soups to add flavor, texture and more nutrients.

Read More…

Now Serving: Lean Beef - FN711

Beef is a versatile menu item whether you’re cooking for one, two or a crowd. Beef provides protein, vitamins and minerals. A typical serving size for beef and other meat is 3 ounces, which is about the size of a deck of cards. A 3-ounce serving of lean ground beef has about 180 calories, 10 grams of fat and 15 percent of the daily recommendation for iron.

Read More…

Now Serving: Breakfast - FN694

Enjoying more family meals adds up to better nutrition, stronger family bonds and children who are less likely to participate in risky behavior. Be flexible with meal schedules and locations of your family meals. If evenings are too hectic, would a regular family breakfast work for you?

Read More…

Now Serving: Meals with Help from Kids - FN705

An increasing number of children and teenagers are eating more meals and snacks away from their home and family. They may be choosing unhealthy ready-to-eat food options rather than spending time preparing a healthy snack or meal – and eating with their families. Encouraging children and teenagers to cook can build healthy lifestyle skills, creativity and healthy food choices. You also are helping them form good eating behaviors that will last a lifetime.

Read More…

Now Serving: Tasty, Healthful Meals on a Budget Week 3: Cost-saving Tips, Menus and Recipes - FN1385

You may have established a weekly menu and shopping list, but now you need the food. Going to the grocery store to buy food for your family may be something you do not look forward to doing. Decreasing the amount of time and money you spend there may help change that. This is the third in a series of publications to help you eat well but spend less at the grocery store.

Read More…

Now Serving: More Calcium Rich Foods - FN697

Children who eat with their families are more likely to meet their calcium needs and drink less soda pop. That’s good news because children are building strong bones and need calcium and other nutrients as the building blocks. Teens have the highest calcium needs due to their rapid growth. Children who meet their calcium and other nutrient needs are less likely to get the bone- thinning disease osteoporosis when they grow older. Adults should meet their calcium needs to keep their bones strong throughout life. About 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and another 18 million are at risk of getting it due to low bone mass. Even though osteoporosis often is associated with women, about 20 percent of those who suffer from it are male. Osteoporosis is responsible for 1.5 million fractures a year, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Read More…

Now Serving: Shopping for Family Meals - FN693

Enjoying more family meals takes a little planning, but it’s worth the effort. Children who eat with their families do better in school, are less likely to take part in risky behavior (such as smoking and drinking alcohol) and are less likely to have symptoms of depression. Children who eat more family meals have an overall healthier diet, compared with children who eat fewer family meals. They eat more fruits, vegetables, grains and calcium-rich foods, and they drink fewer soft drinks. Enjoy more family meals by taking some time to plan your menus and your shopping trips. Involve your family in menu planning, shopping, preparation and cleanup. Children can learn valuable life skills, such as cooking and communication skills, when helping in the kitchen. They learn to appreciate a variety of foods as they help plan and shop for meals.

Read More…

Document Actions

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.