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Food & Nutrition

Fast Fiber Facts - FN1460

The National Institutes of Health recommends 20 to 35 grams of fiber daily for older children, adolescents and adults. Increase your fiber intake slowly, and drink plenty of water to avoid digestive upset.

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Seniors and Food Safety: Why are Seniors at Risk for Foodborne Illness?

Seniors and Food Safety: Why are Seniors at Risk for Foodborne Illness? - FN698

James L. Smith, a microbiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wanted to find the answer to the question of why seniors are more at risk for foodborne illness. He reviewed data from foodborne outbreaks at nursing homes, and compared the immune and digestive systems of seniors and younger individuals, as well as evaluating the overall physical well-being of seniors.

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Seniors and Food Safety: What's a Senior to Eat?

Seniors and Food Safety: What's a Senior to Eat? - FN699

Smart food choices can help reduce the risk for chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke and osteoporosis. These are the leading cause of death and disability among Americans.

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Seniors and Food Safety: What's Cooking?

Seniors and Food Safety: What's Cooking? - FN701

Prevent foodborne illness with these four simple steps to prepare food safely at home.

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Good Nutrition for Busy Families (FN1432 Revised)

With work, meetings and school activities, families have many distractions that keep them away from the family table. Eating together, however, has many benefits. Family meals promote communication skills, cooperation, cooking skills and table manners. Families who eat together also tend to eat more nutritiously. Further, children who help prepare a meal tend to eat the food prepared.

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Folic Acid: A Vitamin Important at Any Age

Folic Acid: A Vitamin Important at Any Age - FN680

The body uses folic acid to produce cells, including red blood cells, so it is important for men and women at all ages. Folic acid has been shown to help prevent up to 70 percent of birth defects of the brain and spinal cord, also known as neural tube defects. All women of childbearing age need folic acid before and during pregnancy. Adequate folic acid during pregnancy also may help prevent cleft lip/palate and other birth defects.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook

Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook - FN702

Let’s face it. Sometimes letting someone else do the cooking is just easier and more enjoyable. And today’s seniors have many eating options. However, all of these options do have food safety implications.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren

Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren - FN703

Many of the feeding practices you used with your own children may no longer be advocated for today’s infants and toddlers. Let’s take a look at the food safety implications of feeding a special new person in your life.

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Rate Your Fiber Fitness FN-1458

Rate Your Fiber Fitness - FN1458

Fiber isn’t a “miracle food,”but adding fiber-rich foods to your diet can have health benefits. The National Cancer Institute suggests that foods high in fiber may be protective against some cancers, particularly colon cancer. Although the National Cancer Institute recommends getting 20 to 35 grams of fiber per day. Soluble fiber (found in oats, dry edible beans, barley and fruits) helps lower blood cholesterol and may reduce the risk of heart disease. Insoluble fiber (found in wheat bran, whole-wheat products and vegetables) helps prevent ulcers, constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis. High fiber foods usually are low in calories and many are inexpensive, too.

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Healthy Skin

Healthy Skin: The Movie - FN1619

Using a story board format, "Healthy Skin:The Movie" takes teens and preteens through some lessons about skin care, including good nutrition and sun protection.

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Do You Need a Dietary Supplement? - FN1607

More than half of all Americans take a daily supplement, and Americans spend billions of dollars on these vitamins, minerals, fiber, herbal products and other items. Including one in your daily schedule may be commonplace.

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Pickle Buckets Can Cause Foodborne Illness! FN1381 (Revised)

Using five-gallon pickle buckets and other types of large deep containers for cooling hot foods should be avoided at all costs. While convenient for storage, these containers are much too large to be used for cooling food safely. Food may be stored in these buckets only after it has been properly cooled to refrigeration temperatures.

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Eat Smart: Cook Food Safely in a Microwave Oven (FN1622)

Did you know? The microwave oven was invented when a scientist walked by a magnetron (experimental microwave tube) and the chocolate bar in his pocket melted. Do microwaves make food radioactive? No. Using a microwave is a quick and easy way to cook or reheat food. You should reheat food to “steaming hot” (165 degrees or higher) to kill harmful bacteria that could make you sick.

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Pulses: The Perfect Food, Healthy to Eat, Healthy to Grow; Peas-Lentils-Chickpeas (FN1508)

Pulses, which include chickpeas/garbanzo beans, dry peas and lentils, are increasingly being recognized for their role in promoting good health. Researchers have reported that regular consumption of pulses may reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. Pulses are a versatile, easy-to-prepare ingredient that can be used in entrees, salads, breads and desserts.

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Packaging, Loading the Freezer and Refreezing

Food Freezing Basics: Packaging, Loading the Freezer and Refreezing - FN614

Freezing is one of the easiest, quickest, most versatile and most convenient methods of preserving foods. Properly frozen foods maintain more of their original color, flavor and texture and generally more of their nutrients than foods preserved by other methods.

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Food Freezing Basics: Methods of Wrapping (FN613)

Proper packaging helps keep food from drying out preserves nutritive value, flavor, texture and color.

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Diabetic Retinopathy: Prevention, Treatment and Diet

Eating for Your Eyes II Diabetic Retinopathy: Prevention, Treatment and Diet - FN1493

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that can lead to blindness. Caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina, diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease. Usually no symptoms are present in the early stages of the disease. As the disease progresses, a person may experience spots in vision or blurred vision.

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Who Needs a Healthy Breakfast? Everyone Does!

Who Needs a Healthy Breakfast? Everybody Does! - FN728

Eat Smart! Start your day off with breakfast. This publication makes learning fun with fill in the blank and word find quizzes.

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Nourish Your Body With Sleep (FN1854)

This provides information about sleep needs, foods that may affect sleep and ways to promote sleep.

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Make Your Own Home-canned Condiments (FN1861)

This handout provides a collection of research-tested condiment recipes, including barbecue sauce, ketchup, taco sauce, pickle relish and pepper rings.

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