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This is a complete list of Crops publications. You can look for more specific types of publications using the links to the left.
IPM Basics in ND Agriculture

IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863

Integrated pest management (IPM) is an integral part of North Dakota’s agriculture. IPM is a program to manage pests that combines a number of strategies to reduce pest risks while protecting the environment, wildlife and people. The goal of IPM in agriculture is to produce safe, abundant and affordable food, feed and fiber. The target pests generally are weeds, insects, and disease-causing organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes.

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ND Barley, Oat  and Rye 2012

North Dakota Barley, Oat and Rye Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A1049-2012

Successful production of these crops depends on numerous factors, including selecting the right variety for a particular area. Characteristics to evaluate in selecting a variety are: yield potential in your area, test weight, straw strength, plant height, reaction to problematic diseases and maturity. Selecting varieties with good quality also is important to maintain market recognition.

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Baseline Water Quality in Areas of Oil Development

Baseline Water Quality in Areas of Oil Development - WQ1614

As oil development increases in North Dakota, private water well owners may be concerned about the quality and quantity of water they use or may use in the future.

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Blister Beetles

Blister Beetles - E1002

Blister beetles are infrequent pests of several crops including alfalfa, sweet clover, potatoes, beans, and sugar beets. They are also injurious to a wide variety of vegetables and many flowers and other ornamentals. They normally cause limited plant damage. However, when they are ingested by horses or other livestock, serious illness or even death may result.brief summary

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Evaluation of Soils for Suitability for Tile Drainage Performance

Evaluation of Soils for Suitability for Tile Drainage Performance - SF1617

The presence of salts and high water tables in North Dakota soils due to an extended climactic wet cycle recently has stimulated interest in the installation of tile drainage systems. The tile controls the water table and encourages the leaching and removal of salts from the soil above the tile lines. This improves soil productivity, culminating in improved crop yields.

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Land Application of Solid Manure

Options for Land Application of Solid Manure - NM1613

Based on the type of livestock facility, manure can be handled and stored as a liquid (less than 5 percent dry matter), slurry (5 to 10 percent dry matter) and/or solid (greater than 15 percent dry matter). Figure 1 shows the relative consistency of the various types of manure that common animal species excrete. Depending on manure consistency, manure application equipment and application methods differ significantly.

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Absinth Wormwood Control

Absinth Wormwood Control - W838

Absinth wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.) is a perennial forb which is easily recognized by its strong sage odor. The plant also is known as American or common wormwood, mugwort or madderwort, and wormwood sage. It is grown in herb gardens for the sage flavor of the leaves. The young flower heads are the source of aromatic oil used to prepare vermouth and absinth.

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Yield Mapping and Use of Yield Map Data

Yield Mapping and Use of Yield Map Data - SF1176-3

Combine yield monitors are growing in popularity. Data are utilized to build fi eld yield maps in certain years or yield frequency maps during multiple years. Maps serve as location-year record of management and may be predictive of yield potential and soil nutrient variability for future crop management decisions.

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Developing Zone Soil Sampling Maps

Developing Zone Soil Sampling Maps - SF1176-2

In the northern Great Plains region, most soil sampling is conducted to determine the residual soil nitrate (N) available following a previous crop that can be used to reduce the N fertilizer required for the next crop. Zone soil sampling has been very effective in revealing residual nitrate patterns and amounts in fi elds. To develop zone boundaries to direct soil sampling, a number of tools can be used. A regional project in North Dakota, Montana and Minnesota concluded that all the tools detailed here can be used to develop zones.

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