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This is a complete list of Crops publications. You can look for more specific types of publications using the links to the left.
Value of Standing Corn Crop for Silage

What is the Value of a Standing Corn Crop for Silage? - EC1343

Corn for silage sometimes is sold standing in the field and farmers frequently ask how to determine a fair price for the standing crop. EC1343 provides some guidelines for estimating the value of a standing corn crop.

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Sunflower Disease Diagnostic Series

Sunflower Disease Diagnostic Series - PP 1727

The series contains 20 colored cards of symptoms and important facts of sunflower diseases.

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Managing Saline Soils in ND

Managing Saline Soils in North Dakota - SF1087

Saline soils have salt levels high enough that either crop yields begin to suffer or cropping is impractical. Excessive salts injure plants by disrupting the uptake of water into roots and interfering with the uptake of competitive nutrients. Several factors contribute to the development of saline soils in North Dakota, but a high water table is a prime requirement. Recognizing how and why salts accumulate is the first step in farming profitably on land interspersed with saline soils. Preventing further encroachment of salinity and addressing remediation strategies are other steps.

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Safflower Production

Safflower Production - A870

Safflower provides three principal products: oil, meal and birdseed. Safflower oil consists of two types: those high in monounsaturated fatty acid (oleic) and those high in polyunsaturated fatty acid (linoleic). This publication provides background information on how to grow safflower in ND, from land selection, fertilizer management, variety selection, seeding, weed management to harvesting and marketing the crop. Safflower is an annual oilseed crop adapted primarily to the central grain areas of the western Great Plains.

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Thistles of ND

The Thistles of North Dakota - W1120

Thistles in agriculture have a reputation as a sign of untidiness and neglect, and are often found on good ground not properly cared for. However, this unfortunate characteristic is only true of a few invasive species and is not accurate for the vast majority of native thistles which have many useful traits.

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Spotted Knapweed

Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa Lam.) - W842

Spotted knapweed is an aggressive, introduced weed species that rapidly invades pasture, rangeland and fallow land and causes a serious decline in forage and crop production. The weed is a prolific seed producer with 1000 or more seeds per plant. Seed remains viable in the soil five years or more, so infestations may occur a number of years after vegetative plants have been eliminated. Spotted knapweed has few natural enemies and is consumed by livestock only when other vegetation is unavailable. The plant releases a toxin that reduces growth of forage species. Areas heavily infested with spotted knapweed often must be reseeded once the plant is controlled.

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Silage Fermentation and Preservation

Quality Forage: Silage Fermentation and Preservation - AS1254

High-quality silage is achieved when lactic acid is the predominant acid produced because it is the most efficient fermentation acid and will drop the pH of the silage the fastest. The faster the fermentation is completed, the more nutrients will be retained in the silage.

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Perennial and Biennial Thistle Control

Perennial and Biennial Thistle Control - W799

Thistles are especially troublesome following cool, wet summers and falls, when seed production and seedling establishment are high. An integrated weed control program that combines chemical, cultural (such as crop rotation or grass competition), mechanical and biological methods is most likely to be successful.

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Fertilizing Canola and Mustard

Fertilizing Canola and Mustard - SF1122

Canola is an important crop in North Dakota. It is grown for its oil content for both food and fuel purposes. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) requirements of canola and mustard are similar to those of small grains. Sulfur (S) requirements for canola are higher than most crops. Soil test results direct fertilizer rates for N, P, K and S. Soil cores should be taken from 0 to 24 inches deep and divided into 0- to 6-inch and 6- to 24-inch samples. P and K should be analyzed on the 0- to 6-inch sample, while N and S should be tested on each depth.

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Stressed or Damaged Crops

Quality Forage: Stressed or Damaged Crops - AS1256

Stressed crops resulting from unfavorable weather conditions require special management considerations. Yield and quality of frost and drought-damaged crops usually are maximized when harvested as silage.

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IPM of Alfalfa Weevil in ND

Integrated Pest Management of Alfalfa Weevil in North Dakota - E1676

The alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is found throughout the U.S. and is the major insect pest of alfalfa in North Dakota. Loss of plant biomass, especially leaf tissue, can be severe. Leaf feeding by alfalfa weevil also reduces nutritional quality and digestibility. Depending on the year, yield loss due to alfalfa weevil can approach 100 percent, especially under drought conditions.

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Corn Silage Management

Quality Forage: Corn Silage Management - AS1253

Silage can be made from many different crops, although the ability to make good silage is limited at times. In North Dakota, corn is a widely used crop for silage. Worldwide, corn silage is one of the most important forges used for livestock.

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Leafy Spurge Control Using Flea Beetles

Leafy Spurge Control Using Flea Beetles - W1183

Leafy spurge is an exotic perennial weed that infests over 800,000 acres in North Dakota. Although leafy spurge can be successfully controlled with herbicides, treating large acreages is not cost-effective. In fact, approximately 40 percent of the leafy spurge infested rangeland has a carrying capacity below the herbicide cost break-even point. Using biological agents to control leafy spurge has become an economic alternative in many locations in the state.

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Integrated Management of Leafy Spurge

Integrated Management of Leafy Spurge - W866

Leafy spurge is the most difficult noxious weed to control in North Dakota and infests all 53 counties in a variety of environments. Leafy spurge is found in pasture, rangeland, cropland, roadsides, shelterbelts, and other non-cultivated areas. Cultivation will control leafy spurge in conventional cropland, but the weed can become the dominant species in reduced-till cropland, pas-ture, and rangeland if not controlled.

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Soybean Soil Fertility

Soybean Soil Fertility - SF1164

Soybean is unique in nutritional needs in the state compared to other crops. Inoculation, fertilizer application and iron deficiency chlorosis are explained.

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Know Your Knapweeds

Know Your Knapweeds - W1146

North Dakota is being threatened by three noxious weeds that could infest more acreage in the state and at a faster rate than leafy spurge. Members of this trio include spotted, diffuse, and Russian knapweed. These three knapweeds already infest more acreage than leafy spurge in Montana and Minnesota, and have been found in over 25 counties in North Dakota. Knapweeds are related to thistles and can spread even faster.

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ID and Control of Purple Loosestrife

Identification and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) - W1132

Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.

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Characteristics Important to Irrigation

Soil, Water and Plant Characteristics Important to Irrigation - AE1675

Irrigation is the application of water to ensure sufficient soil moisture is available for good plant growth throughout the growing season. Irrigation, as practiced in North Dakota, is called "supplemental irrigation" because it augments the rainfall that occurs prior to and during the growing season.

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Dry Bean Production Guide

Dry Bean Production Guide - A1133

Dry bean is a food crop that requires the producers to provide special cultural management and attention. Proper management is essential from cultivar selection, field selection and planting through harvest, plus marketing for maximum profitability. This guide helps producers meet those production challenges.

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Swathing and Harvesting Canola

Swathing and Harvesting Canola - A1171

The timing of swathing canola is important for quality and yield. This publication provides information about the proper stage to swath canola and the effect of swathing time on yield, green seed and percent oil. A description is provided about how to set the swather and combine to optimize the yield and quality of canola.

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