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North Dakota Hard Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide

During the 2015-16 growing season, 140,000 acres of winter wheat were planted and 130,000 acres were harvested. The state’s winter wheat yield this season was estimated at 54 bushels per acre (bu/a), which is up significantly from last year’s yield of 51 bu/a. Generally, conditions were favorable for winter wheat development and yield. Diseases were not as damaging as in past years in most regions of the state.

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Plant Disease Management: Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew

Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.

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Potato Tuber Second Growth

The term secondary growth is often described as heat sprouts, tuber chaining and tuber malformations. This physiological disorder decreases yield and quality of all potato tubers. Good management and varietal selection can minimize this.

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Potato Tuber Viruses: Mop-top Management

The Potato mop-top virus causes tuber quality problems. Infection on tubers may be expressed as arcs or rings on the tuber surface, deep cracking and distortions to the skin that compromising tuber quality. Care must be taken not to infest fields with PMTV from known powdery scab and PMTV infected fields. Additionally, avoiding PMTV or powdery scab-infected seed tubers and using cultivars that are insensitive to mop-top can help prevent this problem.

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Powdery Scab of Potatoes

Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (referred to as S. subterranea), the causal agent of powdery scab and root gall formation in potato, is a soil- and tuber-borne funguslike pathogen. S. subterranea first was reported in the U.S. in 1913. During this same year, the disease was found established in potato-growing states such as Maine, Florida, Minnesota and Oregon. To date, the pathogen can be found causing disease throughout the U.S., as well as several other potato-growing regions around the world.

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