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Plant Diseases

Tobacco Rattle Virus in Potato (A1896)

Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) causes the economically important corky ring spot (CRS) disease in potato. Tobacco rattle virus is transmitted in the filed by soil-inhabiting stuffy root nematodes of the genera Trichodorus and Paratrichodorus.

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IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863

This publication reviews what Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is for agriculture. Examples of different pest management strategies, such as cultural, host plant resistance, mechanical, biological and chemical are described. The steps of implementing IPM and its benefits are summarized.

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Powdery Scab of Potatoes (PP1891)

Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (referred to as S. subterranea), the causal agent of powdery scab and root gall formation in potato, is a soil- and tuber-borne funguslike pathogen. S. subterranea first was reported in the U.S. in 1913. During this same year, the disease was found established in potato-growing states such as Maine, Florida, Minnesota and Oregon. To date, the pathogen can be found causing disease throughout the U.S., as well as several other potato-growing regions around the world.

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Early Blight in Potato (PP1892)

Early blight of potato is caused by the fungal pathogen Alternaria solani. The disease affects leaves, stems and tubers and can reduce yield, tuber size, storability of tubers, quality of fresh-market and processing tubers and marketability of the crop.

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Corn Ear Molds: Basic Questions and Answers - PP1451

Corn ear molds are of concern because of their potential to produce mycotoxins, which may affect livestock feeding value. The following provides some answers to frequent questions about corn ear molds.

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Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet - PP1247

Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.

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Plant Disease Management: Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew ( PP967 Revised)

Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.

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Soybean Disease Diagnostic Series (PP1867)

This series aids in disease identification.

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Sunflower Disease Diagnostic Series (PP1727)

This series aids in disease identification.

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2018 North Dakota Field Crop Plant Disease Management Guide (PP622)

This fungicide guide is based on the latest information available from the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the agricultural chemical industry.

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Plant Disease Management: Deoxynivalenol (DON) in Small Grains (PP1302)

The publication provides information for commonly asked questions on DON/VOM found in small grains. Additional information is provided on management of DON/VOM.

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Late Blight in Potato (PP1849)

Late blight is caused by the funguslike oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. This potentially devastating disease can infect potato foliage and tubers at any stage of crop development.

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Dry Edible Bean Disease Diagnostic Series (PP1820)

This publication is a pictorial guide of Dry Edible Bean diseases.

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Potato Production Problems (A1817)

This has been designed for a clipboard to help with potato diagnostics program.

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Management of Rhizoctonia Root

Management of Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugarbeet - PP1495

Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is one of the most severe soil-borne diseases of sugarbeet and a major problem for growers in Minnesota and North Dakota. This publication provides colored pictures of the disease symptoms and management practices.

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Fungal Leaf Spot Diseases of Wheat

Fungal Leaf Spot Diseases of Wheat: Tan Spot, Stagonospora nodorum bloch and septoria tritici blotch - PP1249

This publication provides information for the identification and management of the common fungal leaf spot diseases found in wheat in North Dakota

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Impact of Planting Dates on Dry Edible Bean

Impact of Planting Dates on Dry Edible Bean - A1806

This publication is a production reference to highlight new planting date research.

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Cereal Leaf Beetle

ND Small Grain Insects Cereal Leaf Beetle - E1230

This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of cereal leaf beetle including identification, life cycle, crop damage, host plants, degree day forecasting, field scouting, economic threshold, biological control and chemical control.

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Sugar Beet Cyst Nematode

Sugar Beet Cyst Nematode - PP1788

This publication describes symptoms of plants infested with SBCN and the life cycle of SBCN. Practices to manage the pests are outlined.

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2015 Dry Bean Survey

2015 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticide Use in MN and ND - E1802

The 2015 dry bean grower survey is the 26th annual survey of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.

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