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Sugarbeets

Herbicide Mode of Action and Sugar Beet Injury Symptoms (A1085)

This technical bulletin has been updated and includes herbicide families that were not discovered when the original bulletin was written. The bulletin contains improved image quality.

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Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet - PP1247

Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.

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Plant Disease Management: Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew ( PP967 Revised)

Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.

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Fertilizing Sugar Beet in North Dakota (SF714 Revised)

Sugar beet growers in this region are paid based on the tons of recoverable sucrose that is extracted from their crop. Therefore, sugar beet profitability depends on producing a high-tonnage crop that is high in sucrose percentage.

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2018 Sugarbeet Production Guide (A1698)

The production guide will provide useful information to assist you in making timely management decisions.

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Stubby Root Nematode and Sampling in Sugar Beet

Stubby Root Nematode and Sampling in Sugar Beet - A1821

Stubby root nematode (SRN) represents an economically important group of nematodes belonging to the genera Trichodorus and Paratrichodorus. SRN often are found in light (sandy) soils and are more problematic when cool, wet soil conditions exist. For example, yield losses as high as 50 percent can be observed in cool and wet growing seasons.

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Leaf-feeding Weevil

Leaf-feeding Weevil in Sugar Beets - E1273

A leaf-feeding weevil, Tanymecus confusus, first was observed feeding on sugar beets in the southern portion of the Red River Valley (Richland County, N.D., and Wilkin County, Minn.) in 1975. The weevil has since caused problems for growers in southern Minnesota (Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui Parle and Swift counties) in 1992 and 1997, and again in Richland County of North Dakota in 2004. A related species, Tanymecus palliatus , is an occasional pest of sugar beets in Europe. Feeding injury by adult Tanymecus confusus typically occurs in small areas within sugar beet fields. Damage is occasionally severe enough to require replanting.

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Management of Rhizoctonia Root

Management of Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugarbeet - PP1495

Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is one of the most severe soil-borne diseases of sugarbeet and a major problem for growers in Minnesota and North Dakota. This publication provides colored pictures of the disease symptoms and management practices.

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Sugar Beet Cyst Nematode

Sugar Beet Cyst Nematode - PP1788

This publication describes symptoms of plants infested with SBCN and the life cycle of SBCN. Practices to manage the pests are outlined.

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ND Weed Control Guide

2016 Weed Control Guide - W253

The information in this guide provides a summary of herbicide uses in crops grown in North Dakota and is based on federal and state herbicide labels, research at ND Ag. Experiment Stations, and information from the North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

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Sprinkler Irrigation Systems

Selecting a Sprinkler Irrigation System - AE91

The four basic methods of irrigation are: subsurface irrigation (“subirrigation,” which uses tile drain lines), surface or gravity irrigation, trickle irrigation (also called drip irrigation) and sprinkler irrigation. Of the acres currently irrigated in North Dakota, more than 80 percent use some type of sprinkler system. Statewide, the center pivot is the most popular sprinkler system.

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