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Publication Now You're Cookin'! Nutritious Snacks for Preschoolers
A child’s small tummy usually cannot hold enough at meals to keep him or her satisfied until the next meal. Kids younger than 6 may need to eat two to three snacks a day because they usually can’t meet their daily requirements in just three meals. Think of snacks as minimeals to help fill the gaps in their diets. Children should be getting the majority of their calories from a variety of grains (preferably whole grains), vegetables, fruits, milk products and lean protein sources.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication Now You're Cookin'! Nutritious After-school Snacks
Providing nutritious snacks doesn’t have to be expensive but you may need to do some planning to make them readily available for your child. Getting kids to eat fruits and vegetables can be difficult. Make snack time fun. For example, provide a variety of cut-up fruits and vegetables and let your kids create their own kabobs. You also may want to try serving vegetables with low-fat dip to make them more appealing.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication Now You're Cookin'! Lean Beef
Beef is a versatile menu item whether you’re cooking for one, two or a crowd. Beef provides protein, vitamins and minerals. A typical serving size for beef and other meat is 3 ounces, which is about the size of a deck of cards. A 3-ounce serving of lean ground beef has about 180 calories, 10 grams of fat and 15 percent of the daily recommendation for iron.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication Now You're Cookin'! Meals with Help from Teens
More children and teenagers are eating meals and snacks away from their home and family. Encouraging teens to help prepare food and clean up can help busy families manage their time. Teens learn important cooking skills and have fun, too. Cooking promotes creativity and helps teens form good eating behaviors that will last a lifetime.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication Now You're Cookin'! Meals with Help from Kids
An increasing number of children and teenagers are eating more meals and snacks away from their home and family. They may be choosing unhealthy ready-to-eat food options rather than spending time preparing a healthy snack or meal – and eating with their families. Encouraging children and teenagers to cook can build healthy lifestyle skills, creativity and healthy food choices. You also are helping them form good eating behaviors that will last a lifetime.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication ECMAScript program Now You're Cookin'! More Fruits and Vegetables
Family meals give parents/caregivers a chance to be good nutrition role models for children. Whether you’re sharing a meal at a park, in a car or at the family table, children who eat with their families eat a more nutritious diet. They eat more fruits and vegetables and other nutritious foods. Shared meals give families a chance to reconnect and talk about the events of their day. Children can learn communication skills, manners and their families’ values as they share food. Sharing meals also creates memories that will last a lifetime. Keep mealtime pleasant and allow enough time to eat because children eat better in a relaxed setting.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication application/x-internet-signup Now You're Cookin'! More Whole Grains
Children who eat more often with their families eat a healthier diet, including more grains, fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication Now You're Cookin'! Shopping for Family Meals
Enjoying more family meals takes a little planning, but it’s worth the effort. Children who eat with their families do better in school, are less likely to take part in risky behavior (such as smoking and drinking alcohol) and are less likely to have symptoms of depression. Children who eat more family meals have an overall healthier diet, compared with children who eat fewer family meals. They eat more fruits, vegetables, grains and calcium-rich foods, and they drink fewer soft drinks. Enjoy more family meals by taking some time to plan your menus and your shopping trips. Involve your family in menu lanning, shopping, preparation and cleanup. Children can learn valuable life skills, such as cooking and communication kills, when helping in the kitchen. They learn to appreciate a variety of foods as they help plan and shop for meals.
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication Troff document Now You're Cookin'! Breakfast
Enjoying more family meals adds up to better nutrition, stronger family bonds and children who are less likely to participate in risky behavior. Be flexible with meal schedules and locations of your family meals. If evenings are too hectic, would a regular family breakfast work for you?
Located in Food & Nutrition
Publication x-conference/x-cooltalk Fresh-squeezed Facts: A Parent’s Guide to Juice
Children who consume too much juice may not be hungry at mealtime and may miss out on other nutrients their bodies need to grow.
Located in Food & Nutrition
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