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Evaluation of Soils for Suitability for Tile Drainage Performance - SF1617
The presence of salts and high water tables in North Dakota soils due to an extended climactic wet cycle recently has stimulated interest in the installation of tile drainage systems. The tile controls the water table and encourages the leaching and removal of salts from the soil above the tile lines. This improves soil productivity, culminating in improved crop yields.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Options for Land Application of Solid Manure - NM1613
Based on the type of livestock facility, manure can be handled and stored as a liquid (less than 5 percent dry matter), slurry (5 to 10 percent dry matter) and/or solid (greater than 15 percent dry matter). Figure 1 shows the relative consistency of the various types of manure that common animal species excrete. Depending on manure consistency, manure application equipment and application methods differ significantly.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Yield Mapping and Use of Yield Map Data - SF1176-3
Combine yield monitors are growing in popularity. Data are utilized to build fi eld yield maps in certain years or yield frequency maps during multiple years. Maps serve as location-year record of management and may be predictive of yield potential and soil nutrient variability for future crop management decisions.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Developing Zone Soil Sampling Maps - SF1176-2
In the northern Great Plains region, most soil sampling is conducted to determine the residual soil nitrate (N) available following a previous crop that can be used to reduce the N fertilizer required for the next crop. Zone soil sampling has been very effective in revealing residual nitrate patterns and amounts in fi elds. To develop zone boundaries to direct soil sampling, a number of tools can be used. A regional project in North Dakota, Montana and Minnesota concluded that all the tools detailed here can be used to develop zones.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Selecting a Sprinkler Irrigation System - AE91
The four basic methods of irrigation are: subsurface irrigation (“subirrigation,” which uses tile drain lines), surface or gravity irrigation, trickle irrigation (also called drip irrigation) and sprinkler irrigation. Of the acres currently irrigated in North Dakota, more than 80 percent use some type of sprinkler system. Statewide, the center pivot is the most popular sprinkler system.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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