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The Old and the New: Two Needle Diseases of Spruce in North Dakota - F1680
Spruce (Picea spp.) is commonly planted in urban and rural landscapes in North Dakota and frequently suffers from needle loss. In general, healthy spruce retain four or more age classes of needles. Premature needle loss of spruce is the result of a variety of causes: improper planting, environmental stress, insect pests and disease. Rhizosphaera needle cast and stigmina needle cast are two of the most common diseases associated with spruce needle loss in North Dakota.
Located in Landing Pages / Gardens, Lawns & Trees
Comparison of Cercospora and Bacterial Leaf Spots on Sugar Beet - PP1244
Cercospora commonly occurs, can result in considerable loss in yield and quality and reduces storability of sugar beet roots in piles. Bacterial Leaf Spots commonly occurs but usually not of economic importance; some rhizomania-resistant varieties have shown increased susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2012 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticde Use in Minnesota and North Dakota - E1640
The 2012 dry bean grower survey is the 23rd annual assessment of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew - PP967
Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet - PP1247
Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863
Integrated pest management (IPM) is an integral part of North Dakota’s agriculture. IPM is a program to manage pests that combines a number of strategies to reduce pest risks while protecting the environment, wildlife and people. The goal of IPM in agriculture is to produce safe, abundant and affordable food, feed and fiber. The target pests generally are weeds, insects, and disease-causing organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Anthracnose of Dry Beans - PP1233
Anthracnose is an economically damaging disease of dry beans that can cause significant levels of seed discoloration and large reductions in yield. The disease is readily transmitted from infected seed to seedlings, which will result in fieldwide epidemics that can spread to nearby fields when the environment is favorable for infection and spread. Because infected seed is not always discolored, the use of certified disease-free seed is critical for management of anthracnose. Further, the disease is difficult to control with foliar fungicides and seed treatments, and the pathogen can develop new races that overcome genetic resistance, making prevention the best disease management strategy.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Dry Edible Bean Rust - PP1601
Between 1996 and 2008, bean varieties with resistance to rust made the threat of a bean rust epidemic in North Dakota very low. However, in 2008 a new race of the pathogen was identified in North Dakota. The new race has the ability to cause disease on the only commonly used effective resistance gene in common varieties. In 2010, the new race spread throughout North Dakota and into northwestern Minnesota. With the spread of the new race, the region is at risk again for the multimillion dollar yield losses caused by bean rust decades ago.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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