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The Old and the New: Two Needle Diseases of Spruce in North Dakota - F1680
Spruce (Picea spp.) is commonly planted in urban and rural landscapes in North Dakota and frequently suffers from needle loss. In general, healthy spruce retain four or more age classes of needles. Premature needle loss of spruce is the result of a variety of causes: improper planting, environmental stress, insect pests and disease. Rhizosphaera needle cast and stigmina needle cast are two of the most common diseases associated with spruce needle loss in North Dakota.
Located in Landing Pages / Gardens, Lawns & Trees
Echinococcus in Dogs and Cats - V1669
Echinococcosis is a disease caused by the infection of animals and humans with tapeworms belonging to the genus Echinococcus. An understanding of the parasite life cycle is important in reducing human and animal exposure.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Dry Bean Production Guide - A1133
Dry bean is a food crop that requires the producers to provide special cultural management and attention. Proper management is essential from cultivar selection, field selection and planting through harvest, plus marketing for maximum profitability. This guide helps producers meet those production challenges.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Comparison of Cercospora and Bacterial Leaf Spots on Sugar Beet - PP1244
Cercospora commonly occurs, can result in considerable loss in yield and quality and reduces storability of sugar beet roots in piles. Bacterial Leaf Spots commonly occurs but usually not of economic importance; some rhizomania-resistant varieties have shown increased susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2012 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticde Use in Minnesota and North Dakota - E1640
The 2012 dry bean grower survey is the 23rd annual assessment of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew - PP967
Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet - PP1247
Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Leptospirosis - V1315
Leptospirosis is caused by the bacteria Leptospira interrogans. Leptopira has more than 180 different serovars (subclassifi cations). Each serovar is adapted to a particular species or maintenance host.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
West Nile Fever - V1235
West Nile fever, which is caused by the West Nile virus (WNV), is a viral disease seen primarily in birds, horses and people. The virus circulates in nature between mosquito vectors and bird reservoir hosts, with humans and horses as accidental or dead-end hosts.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Baylisascariasis - V1227
The raccoon roundworm is known as Baylisascaris procyonis or simply Baylisascaris. Humans can develop severe neurologic and/or ocular disease when they accidentally ingest roundworm eggs that are passed by the raccoon in fecal matter that then contaminates the environment. This typically is the result of fecal contamination of a water or feed source.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
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