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Pinchin’ Pennie$ in the Kitchen: Tips and Recipes for Preparing Elk/Venison - FN1733
Game meats, such as elk and venison, add variety to your diet. They often are lower in fat than other meats. Consider these tips as you expand your cooking to include game meats.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
From field to table . . .a pocket guide for the care and handling of DEER and ELK - FN536
Concern has grown in recent years about a disease affecting deer and elk called Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), which belongs to a family of diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs). Therefore, hunters should take a few simple precautions when handling and transporting deer or elk carcasses.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Wild Side of the Menu No. 1 Care and Cookery - FN124
The most succulent wild game can be destroyed by improper handling in the field or improper cooking at home. The handling of the meat from harvesting to preparing can make a major difference in flavor and safety of the end product. The purpose of this publication is to provide information on proper care and cookery of wild game so you can fully enjoy the fruits of the field.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
On the Pulse of Healthful Eating Using More Pulse Foods In Your Diet - FN1714
Pulse foods are rich sources of protein, fiber, vitamins such as folate, and minerals such as iron and potassium. They are low in fat and sodium, and are naturally gluten- and cholesterol-free. Researchers have reported that regular consumption of pulses may reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. The purpose of this publication is to show how to use more pulse foods in your diet and provide tested recipes and two weeks of sample menus at the 1,800- and 2,100-calorie levels.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Spillin' the Beans: Dry Edible Bean and Snap Bean Recipes, Nutrition Information and Tips - FN1646
Beans are one of the most commonly eaten foods around the world because of their versatility, nutritional value and cost effectiveness.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
All About Beans Nutrition, Health Benefits, Preparation and Use in Menus - FN1643
Beans are among the most versatile and commonly eaten foods throughout the world, and many varieties are grown in the U.S. Because of their nutritional composition, these economical foods have the potential to improve the diet quality and long-term health of those who consume beans regularly. The purpose of this publication is to provide evidence-based nutrition and health information about beans, preparation tips, sample recipes and references for further study.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Now Serving: Slow Cooker Meals! - FN1511
Imagine this: You have just walked in the door and are greeted by the aroma of a tender beef stew simmering in your slow cooker. You slice a loaf of whole-wheat bread and toss a simple spinach and strawberry salad. Dinner is served! Evenings like this can go from a dream to reality when using a slow cooker.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Potatoes from garden to table - FN630
Home-grown potatoes, or those purchased at a farmers market or other venues, are a nutritious part of a healthy diet from early July until the following spring in northern areas.
Located in Landing Pages / Gardens, Lawns & Trees
Questions & Answers About Sodium and Its Impact on Our Health - FN1686
Excessive sodium in our diet can increase our blood pressure, especially in salt-sensitive individuals. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Heart disease and stroke are the first and fourth leading causes of death in the U.S., making cardiovascular disease responsible for one of every three deaths in the country.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Healthwise For Women: Skin Cancer - FN1906
According to one study, self-checks of skin may decrease mortality from melanoma by 63 percent because doctors do not routinely check for skin abnormalities.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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