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Limitations of the Sulfate-sulfur Soil Test as a Predictor of Sulfur Response (SF1880)
In the past dozen years, sulfur deficiency in the north central region has become common in historically unaffected soils. The reasons include higher crop yield and the associated increased demand for soil sulfur, but also the clean air as a result of regulation. The sulfur soil test has been used for years, but researches now find it has little value.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Clay Mineralogy Impacts Crop Potassium Nutrition and Tillage Systems (SF1881)
Clay mineralogy is important in directing potassium rate to corn and other crops in North Dakota. It also has an impact on tillage systems and their success and proper management.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Herbicide Mode of Action and Sugar Beet Injury Symptoms (A1085)
This technical bulletin has been updated and includes herbicide families that were not discovered when the original bulletin was written. The bulletin contains improved image quality.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2017 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticide Use in MN and ND (E1884)
The 2017 dry bean grower survey is the 28th annual survey of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practice of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
The Thistles of North Dakota - W1120
Thistles in agriculture have a reputation as a sign of untidiness and neglect, and are often found on good ground not properly cared for. However, this unfortunate characteristic is only true of a few invasive species and is not accurate for the vast majority of native thistles which have many useful traits.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale L.) Identification and Control - Stop the Spread - W1307
Houndstongue is a biennial, poisonous herb that is native to Eurasia. The plant is a member of the Borage family, which includes more commonly known plants such as Virginia bluebells, forget-me-nots and the fiddlenecks. Houndstongue commonly is found in disturbed areas, including roadsides and trails, and in pasture and woodlands following soil disturbance or overgrazing.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Know Your Knapweeds - W1146
North Dakota is being threatened by three noxious weeds that could infest more acreage in the state and at a faster rate than leafy spurge. Members of this trio include spotted, diffuse, and Russian knapweed. These three knapweeds already infest more acreage than leafy spurge in Montana and Minnesota, and have been found in over 20 counties in North Dakota
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Pea Leaf Weevil in North Dakota (E1879)
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of pea leaf weevil including host plants (field peas and faba beans), geographic range, identification, life cycle, crop damage, monitoring, economic threshold, cultural control, and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Identification and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) - W1132
Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Pinto Bean Response to Phosphorus Starter Fertilizer in East-central North Dakota (A1883)
This is a production reference to highlight pinto bean fertilizer research.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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