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Bones are Bad in Potato Production - A1772
The goal of potato growers is to produce a high-yielding, high-quality crop that is safe for consumption. Animal bones, a foreign material, are a food safety risk, and fields that have bones in the soil are not suitable for potato production.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Bringing Land in the Conservation Reserve Program Back Into Crop Production or Grazing - A1364
This publication provides guidelines for farmers wishing to convert CRP into crop production.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Buckwheat Production - A687
The buckwheat production publication provides background information on how to grow buckwheat in North Dakota, from land selection, fertilizer management, variety selection, seeding, weed management to harvesting and marketing the crop.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Canola Production - A686
Canola has become a popular oilseed crop for North Dakota. The state leads the U.S. in canola production, with approximately 92 percent of domestic production. Canola is a specific edible type of rapeseed, developed in the 1970s, which contains about 40 percent oil. The term “canola” is a name registered by the Western Canadian Oilseed Crushers Association.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Canola Production Field Guide - A1280
Canola is a specific edible type of rapeseed, developed in the 1970s, which contains about 40 percent oil. The term “canola” is a registered name by the Western Canadian Oilseed Crushers Association. Canola varieties must have an erucic acid content of less than 2 percent and less than 30 micromoles of glucosinolates per gram of seed. This makes it acceptable as an edible oil and animal protein feed. Canola oil is considered one of the highest quality edible oils available. Canadian and U.S. farmers mostly grow low-erucic acid and low-glucosinolate varieties. High-erucic acid oil rapeseed is grown and used for industrial lubricants. This type of rapeseed mostly is grown in Europe, although some production occurs in Canada and the U.S.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Care and Maintenance of Irrigation Wells - AE97
Effective irrigation is not possible without a reliable water source. In North Dakota, the availability of relatively shallow aquifers with high-quality water has spurred the development of irrigation in many areas. Irrigation wells must produce a high volume of water during the driest months: July and August. To maintain consistent, high production from year to year, a well requires annual maintenance, just like any other piece of valuable equipment.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Caught in the Grain! - AE1102
People can become caught or trapped in grain in three different ways: the collapse of bridged grain, the collapse of a vertical wall of grain, and entrapment in flowing grain. Moving or flowing grain is involved in all three. People who work with grain – loading it, unloading it, and moving it from bin to bin – need to know about the hazards of flowing grain and how to prevent a grain entrapment situation.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Clubroot of Canola Alert - PP1700
Clubroot is caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae. The pathogen survives in the soil and infects the roots of canola and other Brassicae plants (such as broccoli, cauliflower, Shepherd’s purse and wild mustard), causing a galling and swelling, and giving them a “club” appearance.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Comparison of Cercospora and Bacterial Leaf Spots on Sugar Beet - PP1244
Cercospora commonly occurs, can result in considerable loss in yield and quality and reduces storability of sugar beet roots in piles. Bacterial Leaf Spots commonly occurs but usually not of economic importance; some rhizomania-resistant varieties have shown increased susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Compatibility of North Dakota Soils for Irrigation - AE1637
This publication is intended as a first step to help current and prospective irrigators understand the principles behind the irrigability of soils in North Dakota. This publication should be used in combination with soil survey information of the land to be irrigated. Soil surveys of every county in North Dakota have been completed and documented.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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