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Pea Seed-borne Mosaic Virus (PSbMV) in Field Peas and Lentils - PP1704
Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) is an economically damaging viral pathogen of field peas and lentils that can cause significant losses in seed yield and quality, especially when infections occur before or during bloom. It has been observed on field peas and lentils in North Dakota and on field peas in Montana. PSbMV is distributed worldwide, and it presumably was introduced to North Dakota and Montana on seed imported from other regions.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Pesticide Use and Pest Management Practices in ND, 2012 - W1711
This is the ninth major account of pesticide usage inNorth Dakota and describes pesticide usage onagricultural land in 2012. The information is derived from a comprehensive survey of North Dakota farm operators.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Pinto Bean Response to Phosphorus Starter Fertilizer in East-central North Dakota (A1883)
This is a production reference to highlight pinto bean fertilizer research.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Planning To Irrigate: A Checklist (AE92 Revised)
Installing an irrigation system on a piece of land requires a great deal of planning and a significant financial investment.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Plant Disease Management: Deoxynivalenol (DON) in Small Grains (PP1302)
The publication provides information for commonly asked questions on DON/VOM found in small grains. Additional information is provided on management of DON/VOM.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Plant Disease Management: Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew ( PP967 Revised)
Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Plant Disease Management: Soybean Cyst Nematode - PP1732
Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most damaging soybean disease in the United States. Since its first detection in ND it has spread to a dozen counties. This publication includes information about the SCN symptoms, biology, sampling and management.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Potato Production Problems (A1817)
This has been designed for a clipboard to help with potato diagnostics program.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Potato Tuber Viruses: Mop-top Management (A1777 - Revised)
The Potato mop-top virus causes tuber quality problems. Infection on tubers may be expressed as arcs or rings on the tuber surface, deep cracking and distortions to the skin that compromising tuber quality. Care must be taken not to infest fields with PMTV from known powdery scab and PMTV infected fields. Additionally, avoiding PMTV or powdery scab-infected seed tubers and using cultivars that are insensitive to mop-top can help prevent this problem.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Powdery Scab of Potatoes (PP1891)
Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (referred to as S. subterranea), the causal agent of powdery scab and root gall formation in potato, is a soil- and tuber-borne funguslike pathogen. S. subterranea first was reported in the U.S. in 1913. During this same year, the disease was found established in potato-growing states such as Maine, Florida, Minnesota and Oregon. To date, the pathogen can be found causing disease throughout the U.S., as well as several other potato-growing regions around the world.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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